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Re: Czech/Moravian/Slovak names--??

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  • Daniel Badura
    Greetings to all of you, beeing a long-time lurker to SIG I m awfully sorry to post for the first time when a thread gets rather technical and off-topic. I
    Message 1 of 9 , May 7, 2002
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      Greetings to all of you,

      beeing a long-time lurker to SIG I'm awfully sorry to post for the first time when a
      thread gets rather technical and off-topic. I apologize to all who might not be
      interested (possibly most list members).

      But as the coding of diacritics might be interesting to some of you I
      decided to post this to the list anyway.


      Alastair Millar wrote ...
      > HTML scripts will support diacriticals, IF you are looking at
      > them with the correct code page set in your PC and/or
      > browser (e.g. Windows Central European character set,
      > the Latin II set etc.).


      Let me add this is only true for some versions of some browsers.
      To ensure "cross-browser compatibility" of the diacritics you have to
      use decimal unicodes. After spending some long nights on the browsers' feature to
      render unicodes, here is what I found for MSIE, NC and OPERA:



      1) Note: only tested on Windows-systems. I'm not sure for Mac and Linux. BTW,
      specify a basefont containing czech characters (Arial, Courier, Times New Roman).

      2) you may want to add the following line to the HEAD-sections of
      your page for Central European character sets (in one line). This will not have any
      effect on your English text:
      <META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859- 2">

      3) the carkas (accents) will render anyway, just enter them as usual

      4) for the haceks (carons) and the krouzek (ring) use the following
      unicodes. Just insert them where you'd normally type the characters.
      The pattern for unicode is: &#number;
      Note: the semicolon is an essential part of the unicode!
      The number in brakets is for those who see the czech character instead of the
      unicode (because they use a web interface for receiving mail).

      a) capital C with hacek: Č (268)
      c with hacek: č (269)

      b) capital D with hacek: Ď (270)
      d with hacek: ď (271)

      c) e with hacek: ě (283)
      (there's no capital)

      d) capital N with hacek: Ň (327)
      n with hacek: ň (328)

      e) capital R with hacek: Ř (344)
      r with hacek: ř (345)

      f) capital S with hacek: Š (352)
      s with hacek: š (353)

      g) capital T with hacek: Ť (356)
      t with hacek: ť (357)

      h) u krouzkovane (with ring): ů (367)
      (again no capital)

      i) capital Z with hacek: Ž (381)
      z with hacek: ž (382)


      For more information on unicodes visit www.unicode.org (if my memory serves me
      well).


      HTH, Daniel
      (switching to lurking-mode again)


      PS: I've written a macro for Word 97 making it easy to insert the
      proper unicodes when preparing czech text for insertion to html-
      editors and a module for Access 97 which enables you to enter czech
      diacritics easily without messing around with your standart keyboard
      layout.

      If need should be I'd upload them to the list's file section.
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