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Re: [sig] dumb sarafan question

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  • LiudmilaV@aol.com
    In a message dated 4/12/2002 12:35:05 AM Pacific Daylight Time, ... Have you tried making a sarafan without straps? I am convinced that a sleeveless one-piece
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 13, 2002
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      In a message dated 4/12/2002 12:35:05 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
      tasha_medvedeva@... writes:


      > One mistake I made on my first sarafan was, shall we
      > > say imperfect situation of the straps. How do you
      > > measure the darn top of the dress to figure out
      > > exactly where to put the darn things?

      Have you tried making a sarafan without straps? I am convinced that a
      sleeveless one-piece dress would be more "period" that a dress with straps,
      and I make all my "sarafans" this way. I will try to put some pictures in
      the "Photos" area at the SIG-list site, but these are basically rectangles
      with a hole for your head, and gores on the sides. Such dresses post-period
      were known as "shushuns" or "sayans," depending on whether they had fake
      sleeves in the back or not. The terms were known in late period as well, as
      woman's clothing, though of unknown style. They are very similar to
      "shubka," a known period garment of similar cut but with long (to the ground)
      sleeves which had arm slits at the top.

      Here are some references for this, though they are all in Russian, I am
      afraid. I also have a newer book with a picture of a partially reconstructed
      period garment, similar to post-period shushun in appearance, but the
      reference is in my computer and the book is still in some box (I recently
      moved):

      Sosnina, N., & Shangina, I. Russkii Traditsionnyi Kostium: Illustrirovanaia
      Entsiklopediia (Traditional Russian Costume: Illustrated Encyclopedia).
      Iskusstvo-SPB, St. Peteburg, 1998.

      Rabinovich, M. G. Odezhda Russkih XIII-XVII vv. (Russian dress of XIII-XVII
      cc.). In Rabinovich, M. G. (ed.) Drevniaia Odezhda Narodov Vostochnoy Evropy.
      Nauka, Moskow, 1986, pp. 63-111.

      Giliarovskaia, N. V. Russkii Istoricheskii Kostium dlia Stseny. (Russian
      historic costume for the stage) Iskusstvo, Moscow, 1945

      Here is a quote from my notes on the subject, based on translations:

      Sarafan is probably the most debated garment in this area of research,
      since there is no clear connection between the dress itself and the name
      "sarafan." Until the XVIIth century, "sarafan" or "sarafanets" is found in
      sources as a name for men's long garment that buttoned up the front
      (Rabinovich, 1986, p. 68). However, there are period names ("shushun,"
      "shubka," "sayan," "feriazi," etc.) for a women's dress put on over the head
      that later co-existed with "sarafan" as terms for women's light clothing worn
      over a shirt. Thus, what later became known as "sarafan" probably existed in
      period in some form, but by other names (Sosnina & Shangina, 1998, p. 282).
      The researchers suggest that it evolved either out of a lengthened ponieva
      that acquired straps, or out of a dress that lost its original long sleeves,
      with later view more prevalent (Rabinovich, 1986, p. 68). Still, there are no
      surviving items or verified pictures that could document the cut of this
      garment clearly. Note that any future use of the word "sarafan" in this paper
      will refer to the variety of garments with the names given above.
      "Shubka" (not to be confused with "shuba," a winter garment with fur)
      was the most frequently encountered in period sources variety of a
      sarafan-type dress. Giliarovskaia (1945, p. 98) describes it as a
      floor-length garment widened with gores, with straight neck opening, where a
      small slit was buttoned using loop closure. The sleeves were very long, often
      reaching the hem, but were not actually used. They had arm slits at the top,
      and were either simply thrown back or tied one over the other. Fancy shubki
      were made out of sturdy, heavy silk brocades, velvets, and other fancy
      fabrics and lined with silk taffeta. They were not decorated other than
      occasional trim along the bottom, but were worn with a detachable rich collar
      on special occasions. Plain shubki were made of woolen fabrics or dyed linen
      and lined with taffeta only along the hemline. Apparently, tsaritsa's shubka
      was a special garment, made out of rich golden brocades. It was, in this
      case, a buttoned dress with over 15 precious buttons, richly trimmed along
      the hem, sleeves, and front opening. The sleeves of tsaritsa's shubka were
      only wrist length, but up to 35 cm wide at the end (Giliarovskaia, 1945, p.
      98). This was probably a derivation of Byzantine-like garments worn by
      Russian rulers throughout the period.
      "Saian," "sushun," and "feriaz'," three other sarafan-type garments
      encountered in period written sources, are better known from post-period
      examples. In more archaic version saian was made from a length of fabric
      folded in half, with gores. Armholes were very wide, and round or rectangular
      neck openings were often supplemented by additional vertical slits (Sosnina &
      Shangina, 1998, p. 288). Sushun was similarly made, with a square neck hole
      and gore-like widening strips of fabric inserted at the side seams. It's most
      prominent characteristic was the addition of the long, narrow false sleeves
      at the back of the armholes. These sleeves were completely non-functional and
      either tied at the back or tucked into the belt (Sosnina & Shangina, 1998, p.
      315). Feriazi', like sushun, had false sleeves, but was built out of either
      separate front and back pieces with gores, or two front and one back pieces
      with gores. The later type of feriazi' could be either sewn shut at the
      front, or buttoned with loop closures (Sosnina & Shangina, 1998, p. 332).
      Similarity of these garments to older shubka suggests the likelihood that
      their names found in period documents refer to garments resembling these
      post-period clothes.


      Liudmila


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Patricia Hefner
      OK, thanks, that s for when I make my real project with better material (this is broadcloth, and is a Meridian version of this won t get me kicked off of
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 13, 2002
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        OK, thanks, that's for when I make my "real" project
        with better material (this is broadcloth, and is a
        Meridian version of "this won't get me kicked off of
        site for not being medieval, I'm under pressure to
        come up with some court garb I won't burn up in
        Meridies in July in")the better material will look
        more like silk). I need a more specific pattern for a
        sleeveless dress like this. I'll think more about it
        when I've gotten over today's event. Whew! I'm zonked!
        Thanks for the help!

        Isabelle


        --- LiudmilaV@... wrote:
        > In a message dated 4/12/2002 12:35:05 AM Pacific
        > Daylight Time,
        > tasha_medvedeva@... writes:
        >
        >
        > > One mistake I made on my first sarafan was, shall
        > we
        > > > say imperfect situation of the straps. How do
        > you
        > > > measure the darn top of the dress to figure out
        > > > exactly where to put the darn things?
        >
        > Have you tried making a sarafan without straps? I am
        > convinced that a
        > sleeveless one-piece dress would be more "period"
        > that a dress with straps,
        > and I make all my "sarafans" this way. I will try
        > to put some pictures in
        > the "Photos" area at the SIG-list site, but these
        > are basically rectangles
        > with a hole for your head, and gores on the sides.
        > Such dresses post-period
        > were known as "shushuns" or "sayans," depending on
        > whether they had fake
        > sleeves in the back or not. The terms were known in
        > late period as well, as
        > woman's clothing, though of unknown style. They are
        > very similar to
        > "shubka," a known period garment of similar cut but
        > with long (to the ground)
        > sleeves which had arm slits at the top.
        >
        > Here are some references for this, though they are
        > all in Russian, I am
        > afraid. I also have a newer book with a picture of a
        > partially reconstructed
        > period garment, similar to post-period shushun in
        > appearance, but the
        > reference is in my computer and the book is still in
        > some box (I recently
        > moved):
        >

        <snip>

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