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Russian Film "Andrei Rublev"

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  • drobnock2
    For those interested in the biography of 15 century russian icon painter, Andrei Rublev. The Sundance Channel, is showing the 1969 film by Andrel Tarkovsky.
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 5, 2002
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      For those interested in the biography of 15 century russian icon
      painter, Andrei Rublev. The Sundance Channel, is showing the 1969 film
      by Andrel Tarkovsky. The garb is period. Best part, the casting of a
      "great bell."

      Janos
    • Shadow42
      ... I actually rented that movie last week, believe it or not!!!!!! The best part was the Tatar invasion. Other than that, I had trouble understanding what was
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 6, 2002
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        drobnock2 wrote:

        >For those interested in the biography of 15 century russian icon
        >painter, Andrei Rublev. The Sundance Channel, is showing the 1969 film
        >by Andrel Tarkovsky. The garb is period. Best part, the casting of a
        >"great bell."
        >
        >Janos
        >
        I actually rented that movie last week, believe it or not!!!!!! The best
        part was the Tatar invasion. Other than that, I had trouble
        understanding what was going on.

        Laura/Leya
      • MHoll@aol.com
        In a message dated 4/5/2002 9:13:32 PM Central Standard Time, ... Sorry to intrude, but it is not a biography. There isn t enough information on Rublev to
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 6, 2002
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          In a message dated 4/5/2002 9:13:32 PM Central Standard Time,
          drobnock@... writes:


          > For those interested in the biography of 15 century russian icon
          > painter, Andrei Rublev.

          Sorry to intrude, but it is not a biography. There isn't enough information
          on Rublev to write a biography. Much of the film is invention, and has a
          political slant needed at the time. As a historical movie, it's not good.


          > The Sundance Channel, is showing the 1969 film
          > by Andrel Tarkovsky. The garb is period.

          Sorry, not even that. I'm tired of "dark, hungry, filthy, ragged masses." The
          garb reflects Soviet ideology much better than the actual period.


          > Best part, the casting of a "great bell."
          >
          The scene may be good, but I'll reserve my judgment as to accuracy until I've
          researched the problem of casting bells. I may not do it, eve, but I'd
          consult an expert first.

          As you may have guessed, "Andrei Rublev" is not one of my favorite movies. I
          find it fairly annoying. "Alexandr Nevsky" isn't too bad, but don't base your
          research on anything in any of the two movies.

          Predslava,
          critical as usual.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Alexey Kiyaikin
          Greetings! ... As for Andrey Rublev , it wasn t even considered a historic movie. As other Tarkovsky s films, it s rather a meditation on the topic given. And
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 7, 2002
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            Greetings!
            > As you may have guessed, "Andrei Rublev" is not one of my favorite movies. I
            > find it fairly annoying. "Alexandr Nevsky" isn't too bad, but don't base your
            > research on anything in any of the two movies.

            As for "Andrey Rublev", it wasn't even considered a historic movie. As
            other Tarkovsky's films, it's rather a meditation on the topic given.
            And sorry, Alexander Nevsky is not that too bad, it's hopeless. It's
            that film that contained state ideology that completely disagred with
            the historic truth. It's already proven that the battle was only one
            episode of the Order vs Novgorod vendetta, though a major one. The
            Order sent an armed host of several dozens knights (20 of them were
            killed, 6 were captured, all is cross-checked by the rhymed chronicle
            of the Order & the Russian chronicles) accompanied with about 300-400 footmen & -
            several hundred Estonians, making the total of about a thousand. No
            mass drowning of the poor knights happened, as even according to the
            Russian chronicle, many foes were slain, and SOME were drowned. I dare
            ask: what idiot should the war leader be, Russian or German, to lead
            his host onto the ice on the 5 April, when drifting of ice in Russia
            starts just this month?

            The whole film was shot in 1942, when the Communist leaders understood
            the threat to their rule, and used even those means they outlawed
            earlier - they addressed the Orthodox Church for assistance, they
            revived the memory of the "damned aristocrats" like Suvorov, Nakhimov,
            Kutuzov & Alexander Nevsky. Be the threat more serious, they'd
            have remembered Dmitry Donskoy as well. So, the orders of the former4
            were founded, the implementation of the Old Russian (pre-revolution)
            uniform was planned, etc. The leaders tried to unite the nation at
            least by old victories, be they real or exaggerated. So, the aim of
            the film was to impress by all means. The refrain theme of the film
            was "unite, the people of Rus, for deadly battle, for the last
            battle...". And anything that helped to create the image of "almost
            fascists" knights vs "noble Russian warriors" was used. Thus, there
            are numerous anachronisms, to say nothing of the usual cliche of the
            Soviet propaganda of that time: enemies armed to the teeth vs Russian
            peasants, armored with their belief & almost unarmed, wielding clumsy
            axes taken from home. Disgusting. Sometimes such cliche was also used
            in "Ilya Muromets" (this film under a different title was discussed on
            the Florilegium), and later, in the "Mark II" soviet propaganda spawn
            of the 1980s, "Vasili Buslayev". If it is available in the US, I
            suggest avoiding it as if it's a leper.
            So, returning to Alexander Nevsky. That film made some folk jokes in
            later Russia, I watch it sometimes, feeling the same as when I watch
            Alexander Rou's fairy tales (available in the US). A fact from the
            history of the cinema: one episode had to be re-shot as a plane flew
            over the battlefield. My remark: that didn't make the film less
            historecally truthful.
            bye,
            Alex.
          • K2356@aol.com
            My name is Kevin and i am new to the group,in regards to the film Alexander Nevsky and the Russ miltary Order of Nevsky.I read that the designer used the actor
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 7, 2002
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              My name is Kevin and i am new to the group,in regards to the film
              Alexander Nevsky and the Russ miltary Order of Nevsky.I read that
              the designer used the actor who played Nevsky in the movie as a model
              for the order because no images of the true Nevsky exist.Stalin would use
              anything and everything if it futhered Stalin's cause.I own the Order,bought
              it on my last trip to Lithuania,i think the Order is real cool,i tend to think
              of it now representing the brave men who who died for their country Russ.

              While we are talking of Eisenstein's films,i have a copy of part 1 & 2 of
              Ivan Grozny,it is my understanding the part 3 was made,but Stalin ordered
              part 3 destroyed because it showed Ivan's decent into madness.I am no
              expert on the Russia of the 16th century.I have done a little reading
              regarding
              Ivan Grozny,did Eisenstein make any attempt to reflect "true" history in the
              filming of Ivan IV ?

              I believe that Ivan was some sort of hero to Stalin,because Stalin made the
              statement that Ivan the Terrible was not Terrible enought.

              Kevin
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