Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re. Painted ware

Expand Messages
  • Donald and Andrea Pionek
    Greetings! This is my first posting on the list . I usually lurk about and gleen tidbits of info that I can use to direct my personna research. To respond to
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 2, 1999
      Greetings!

      This is my first posting on the list . I usually lurk about
      and gleen tidbits of info that I can use to direct my personna research. To
      respond to the quest for lead testing , there should be a kit availabe at
      your nearest hardware store. Having purchased an older home a few years ago
      I found it necessary to use one in deciding what painted surfaces needed to
      be stripped and repainted. They come in a stick form and also in a paper
      strip form. I used the latter as it was easier for me.


      Karol
    • Jenn/Yana
      The coloring used on the brightly painted nineteenth century wares was usually cinnabar (vermillion) and metallic powders covered with varnish. Cinnabar is a
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 2, 1999
        The coloring used on the brightly painted nineteenth century wares was
        usually cinnabar (vermillion) and metallic powders covered with varnish.
        Cinnabar is a natural occuring mercuric sulphide (mercuric ore). Over long
        periods, mercury contamination can cause permanent brain damage, as well as
        harming the liver and kidneys. I doubt that the 20th century wares have
        changed much, so to be safe, don't use them for eating out of unless they
        are specifically made as eating utensils.


        From: http://www.writer2001.com/perron2.htm

        >>Pebble Red: this material was once known as "cinnabar," or
        naturally-occurring vermilion, a natural mercuric sulphide (HgS)...Also
        called "synoper" or "sinopia."

        Vermilion is moderately toxic by skin contact, and highly toxic by
        inhalation and ingestion, causing mercury poisoning, which can cause severe
        damage to the nervous system and kidneys.>>
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        Yana (Ilyana Barsova) jdmiller2@...
        http://www.sit.wisc.edu/~jdmiller2
        Slavic Interest Group http://www.uwplatt.edu/~goldschp/slavic.html
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.