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Re: Slavic paganism

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  • Dmitriy V Ryaboy
    Hi Posadnik and Predslava! Rybakov wrote his book in 1981, not 1994; that must be the year your copy was printed. As far as his academic efforts, Predslava
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 10, 2002
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      Hi Posadnik and Predslava!

      Rybakov wrote his book in 1981, not 1994; that must be the year your copy
      was printed.

      As far as his academic efforts, Predslava isn't exactly the first to accuse
      him of over-extrapolating. Prof. Ivanits put it best, I think, when she
      said that "B. A. Rybakov has been especially daring in his attempts to
      expand our knowledge of Russian paganism." Note that she goes on using his
      material throughout her book -- but carefully, which is the key

      The thing with Rybakov is that he puts something from the 10th century
      together with somehing from the 19th century with amazing ease and grace as
      long as it fits his concept. His goal wasn't finding what Slavs parcticed,
      but rather generating a feasible, rich, and complete system based on a slew
      of informatin from different fields. While some results gathered this way
      are perfectly valid -- given enough evidence -- others aren't quite as much.
      For example, in the song Posadnik quotes --
      > - A mi proso seyali, seyali,
      > Oi, did Lado, seyali, seyali -
      > and there is evidence of Lada the goddess, is it a followed
      > continuity?
      No, that's not continuity. The Beatles sing "obladi-oblada." Are there
      echoes of Slavic paganism in that song? It's a refrain that's common almost
      universally.

      Rybakov's book is bold and daring, and by far the most thorough and
      encompassing work on the subject so far -- but it's still speculative and
      over-bold in places, and is to be treated with caution. Come, Alexey, you
      are the one who warned me about Kirpichnikov -- who occupies a no less
      distinguished position in his area of study than does Rybakov.

      > Povest Vremennykh Let
      > traces Russian history to eneolythic times, and I call this
      > continuity. Lots of then existing complexes of beliefs still exist.

      Lots have been "re-discovered", too -- although many do, like our
      unwillingness to hand anything across the door -- you either have to invite
      a visitor inside, or step outside with him. Has to do with the whole
      outside/inside spirits dichotomy... Americans do not do this -- which makes
      for a bit of an uncomfortable situation with the pizza guy! :)
      When you say that PVL traces history to eneolythic times -- what exactly are
      you talking about? I think it's been pretty universally accepted,
      particularly by Soviet anti-Normanism scholars, that even its 9th century
      material (what with the famous 862 "varangians called Russes" entry) is
      highly debatable.


      Off to do more Estrella packing,

      Dmitriy Ryaboy/Shelomianin

      "The official SIG debunker of the Book of Veles"
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