Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Painted ware

Expand Messages
  • MHoll@aol.com
    I am talking about the black spoons and dishes with red and gold paint that we all like so much. It is quite OOP, but that s not what I m concerned with today.
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 30, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      I am talking about the black spoons and dishes with red and gold paint that
      we all like so much.

      It is quite OOP, but that's not what I'm concerned with today.

      I have heard, from what I think is a reliable source, that the paint on these
      items contains lead than can leach into food, especially hot or acid, and
      that chipped paint can be dangerous. I have been using these things only as
      decorations, but now I wonder, is there any way to check them for lead
      content without hiring a full-blown lab, spending a fortune, or destroying
      the piece? Just in case the lead is just a legend.

      Any chemists out there?

      Predslava,
      leery of legends, but ready to believe in any villainy committed by the Sov.
      Union.
      So it's genetic, so there!
    • Leslie Helms
      ... It wouldn t be an unusual villainy. Many pieces of overseas-produced pottery, painted ware, and glazed items have lead in them. In the past this occurred
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 30, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        At 10:13 AM 9/30/99 -0400, you wrote:
        >I am talking about the black spoons and dishes with red and gold paint that
        >we all like so much.
        >I have heard, from what I think is a reliable source, that the paint on these
        >items contains lead than can leach into food, especially hot or acid, and
        >that chipped paint can be dangerous.
        >Predslava,
        >leery of legends, but ready to believe in any villainy committed by the Sov.
        >Union.

        It wouldn't be an unusual villainy. Many pieces of overseas-produced
        pottery, painted ware, and glazed items have lead in them. In the past
        this occurred almost universally, but some countries are doing better as
        awareness increases. Generally, we should be skeptical of *anything* that
        wasn't specifically designed for eating and produced in a country with
        consumer protection policies. Lead glazing is still occasionally
        discovered in the US.

        Generally speaking, you should not use anything for food that might have
        been considered only decorative when it was made.

        If anyone has updates on countries that have managed full compliance with
        lead-free standards, please speak up.

        Larisa Ivanova
      • LiudmilaV@aol.com
        In a message dated 10/1/1999 10:06:48 AM W. Europe Daylight Time, sig@onelist.com writes:
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 1, 1999
        • 0 Attachment
          In a message dated 10/1/1999 10:06:48 AM W. Europe Daylight Time,
          sig@onelist.com writes:

          << I have heard, from what I think is a reliable source, that the paint on
          these
          items contains lead than can leach into food, especially hot or acid, and
          that chipped paint can be dangerous. I have been using these things only as
          decorations, but now I wonder, is there any way to check them for lead
          content without hiring a full-blown lab, spending a fortune, or destroying
          the piece? Just in case the lead is just a legend. >>

          My family had a relative in the place where they produce "hohloma," the
          described painted ware. Since my mother loved those things (and brought her
          collection over), Uncle Shura always brought us something when he came to
          visit. He never said we shouldn't use them, but we didn't except for a
          couple of small cups. I used to drink from one when I was little, and
          nothing bad happened to me, though the cup didn't fare so well. I think my
          grandma used to have a soop-serving spoon of the kind, which she used and
          which became unusable eventually. In any case, I suggest admiring your
          hohloma items but not using them for hot foods or drinks, if you want them to
          survive.

          Liudmila
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.