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Re: [sig] period Slavic superstitions/pysanka

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  • Jenne Heise
    ... There are specific mentions of red eggs being exchanged that I recall. The author talks about brazilwood being used as a dye. When Sarah bas Mordecai and
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 3, 2002
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      > I suspect that the exchange of coloured eggs would have been those
      > done hard-boiled with onion (and other edible) dyes that are blessed by
      > the priest and then taken home an eaten.

      There are specific mentions of 'red eggs' being exchanged that I recall.
      The author talks about brazilwood being used as a dye.

      When Sarah bas Mordecai and I did a mass egg dyeing last year, we found
      that boiling eggs with yellow onion skins produces a rich mahogany red.=
      There's a short description with pictures online at:
      http://www.lehigh.edu/~jahb/jadwiga/A&S/dyedeggs.html

      > I also suspect that some of the dyes they used would have
      > been clothing dye. I have no basis other then more recent history for
      > this - my grandmother used to make some of her own egg dyes from
      > mushrooms - which are known to be poisonous but were used to dye cloth
      > in period.

      I believe this is also documented for recent not period times in the book
      I spoke of.

      > If anyone would like a description of the edible dyes I know of, I
      > can post it.

      ME! Me! I would love to see your list.

      --
      Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
      disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
      "You're down as expendable. You don't get a weapon." Diana Wynne Jones
    • Susan Koziel
      Oops, I meant to add this to the other message: I have proposal for a Masters paper written by Phyllis Basaraba Superstitions - Ukrainian Folk Beliefs. It
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 3, 2002
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        Oops, I meant to add this to the other message:
        I have proposal for a Masters paper written by Phyllis Basaraba
        "Superstitions - Ukrainian Folk Beliefs." It doesn't have period dates
        (it seems she's a ethanographer concerned with modern day beliefs), but
        it could be a start if you want to see what she has listed as a folk
        belief and work backwards. Also her thesis is about the Winter Cycle
        songs which contains a small bit of information on the Malanka
        celebration gives some indication of superstitions (but again no dates).

        -Kataryna

        Jenne Heise wrote:

        > > Try Okana's website @ www.okana.net ....it is a great
        > resource.
        > > Although it is from a Polish perspective...Okana does have some
        > Russian
        > > information...if not on the website her book Singing Back the Sun
        > does have
        > > explanations of pisanki.. Jaek
        >
        > Unfortunately, I haven't found Oksana's website to have
        > well-documented
        > information for our period. However, there is a book on the history of
        >
        > Easter Eggs called _An Egg at Easter_ by Victoria Newall
        > (Bloomington, Indiana University Press [1971]) which has period
        > documentation for the exchange of colored eggs, but I haven't found
        > any
        > documentation of the wax-resist method or of complex patterns to
        > period--
        > which may mean only that nobody has studied historical documents for
        > mentions of it and published a book in English about it. I've been
        > reading _An Egg at Easter_ in snatches, so I will go back and see if I
        > can
        > find the information that IS in it and post it.
        >
        > --
        > Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise
        > jenne@...
        > disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
        > "You're down as expendable. You don't get a weapon." Diana Wynne
        > Jones
        >
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      • Susan Koziel
        Hmm... Onion skin - bright yellow to red (depends how long you let them boil - if you want some fun take a bit of glue and paste on leaves & flowers to the out
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 3, 2002
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          Hmm...
          Onion skin - bright yellow to red (depends how long you let them boil -
          if you want some fun take a bit of glue and paste on leaves & flowers to
          the out side (let the glue dry), wrap them in cheese cloth & boil away
          for enough time to get the eggs yellow (5min or less) - you will end up
          with a white leaf shape, and variations in the yellow where the cheese
          cloth wrinkled.

          Beet Juice - bright red (but it will rub off).... do not boil the egg
          use the picking juice from pickled beets.
          Black Tea leaves - Tans and browns, boil the egg in tea that's left from
          the night before.
          I know we (my family) got a green one year but I don't recall with
          what... Green onion (should be yellow)? - maybe spinach (slightly
          spoiled)

          Inky cap mushrooms when they get to old to eat make a really good black.
          I haven't had a chance to try this on eggs - they didn't come up this
          year - it was to dry- but you can paint with the stuff. I wouldn't eat
          it though since it's a sort of slime produced by the decaying mushroom
          (the mushroom is safe to eat).

          These are ones I remember off the of of my head. I should have more when
          I call my mom tonight.

          I recall trying cabbage but I didn't get the same colour you did - I
          think it was just a brown, like the tea.

          I do know that these dyes are going to change subtly with the water
          composition in an area. (could explain the onion dye difference - I
          never got the brilliant red that you did).
          -Kataryna
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