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Men's tunics

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  • serguei plonski
    Good afternoon! I apologize for being off-topic, but I m curious about the colours of men s tunics in Eastern Slavic lands somewhere between the 8th and the
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 6, 2002
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      Good afternoon!

      I apologize for being off-topic, but I'm curious about the colours of men's
      tunics in Eastern Slavic lands somewhere between the 8th and the 11th
      century. I know modern folklore tends to dress Russians in white tunics with
      red trim, but I was wondering about any other colours in that particular
      period.


      Thank you,

      Sergei




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    • Kate Jones
      ... Sorry for the delay in replying - I m slightly behind in my email. White was a fairly popular color for men s tunics, and indeed the undertunic would
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 18, 2002
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        > I apologize for being off-topic, but I'm curious about the colours of men's
        > tunics in Eastern Slavic lands somewhere between the 8th and the 11th
        > century. I know modern folklore tends to dress Russians in white tunics with
        > red trim, but I was wondering about any other colours in that particular
        > period.

        Sorry for the delay in replying - I'm slightly behind in my email.

        White was a fairly popular color for men's tunics, and indeed the
        undertunic would normally have been white.

        Looking through a few of my books, though, I see illuminations of men
        wearing tunics that are red, yellow, dark and light blue, brown, sort
        of an off-pink, and green, with contrasting trim from the same group
        of colors.

        While this may say more about the colors available for painting than
        what they actually used for clothing, I have seen a very similar color
        palette used for ecclesiastical embroideries, so these colors were
        both available and used for fabric items as well.

        I think they're probably all safe for clothing. Especially the
        red. Red is beautiful, after all... :)

        Kat'ryna
        --
        Kate Jones | I turned my world upside-down
        kate@... | and that's how everything landed...
      • John-Joseph Bober
        I tend to look at questions like this as follows - what would they have had around to dye the fabric with? Or, in the case of white not dye it with. I tend
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 18, 2002
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          I tend to look at questions like this as follows - what would
          they have had around to dye the fabric with? Or, in the case
          of "white" not dye it with. I tend to be very leery of true
          "white", just because I'm unsure of period bleaching techniques
          sans Clorox.
          If I remember correctly, there is a CA kicking around on dying.
          I'd say, check that out and see if you can cross reference with
          some resource which will tell you if that particular plant was
          period to the Russia you want to hale from.
          Just some thoughts.

          Jan
        • MHoll@aol.com
          In a message dated 1/18/2002 7:39:26 PM Central Standard Time, ... Vegetable dyes mostly, but also expensive cochineal (an insect giving a red dye), and dyed
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 18, 2002
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            In a message dated 1/18/2002 7:39:26 PM Central Standard Time,
            jjbober4@... writes:


            > I tend to look at questions like this as follows - what would
            > they have had around to dye the fabric with?

            Vegetable dyes mostly, but also expensive cochineal (an insect giving a red
            dye), and dyed fabrics from China, Persia, Byzantium, wool from England, etc.


            The native dyes probably weren't much different from what was used in
            Northern Europe in general.

            Predslava (reference-less since the library's had to be fed -- it swallowed
            back all "my" books!)


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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