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Re: About red hair - Khazars/Scythians

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  • kbrook@pi.pair.com
    Many medieval writers attested to the Khazars Turkic origins including Theophanes, al-Masudi, Rabbi Yehudah ben Barzillai, Martinus Oppaviensis, and the
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 23, 2001
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      Many medieval writers attested to the Khazars' Turkic origins
      including Theophanes, al-Masudi, Rabbi Yehudah ben Barzillai,
      Martinus Oppaviensis, and the anonymous authors of the Georgian
      Chronicle and Chinese chronicle T'ang-shu. The Arabic writer al-
      Masudi in Kitab at-Tanbih wrote: "...the Khazars... are a tribe of
      the Turks." (cited in Peter Golden, Khazar Studies, pp. 57-58). T'ang-
      shu reads: "K'o-sa [Khazars]... belong to the stock of the Turks."
      (cited in Peter Golden, Khazar Studies, p. 58). In his Chronographia,
      Theophanes wrote: "During his [Byzantine emperor Heraclius] stay
      there [in Lazica], he invited the eastern Turks, who are called
      Chazars, to become his allies." (cited in Theophanes, The Chronicle
      of Theophanes Confessor, translated by Cyril Mango and Roger Scott,
      1997, p. 446).

      However, the Khazars probably did mix with other outside groups (even
      King Joseph of the Khazars married an Alan (Ossetian) princess), and
      the Khazars were a diverse community, probably with all sorts of hair
      colors including red and black.

      Ibn-Said al-Maghribi describes the Khazars as follows: "As to the
      Khazars.... their complexions are white, their eyes blue, their hair
      flowing and predominantly reddish, their bodies large and their
      natures cold. Their general aspect is wild." (D.M. Dunlop, "The
      History of the Jewish Khazars", Schocken [1967], page 11).

      On the other hand, Al-Istakhri said that the Khazars have black hair
      (Dunlop, page 96).

      Best wishes,
      Kevin Alan Brook
      Author, The Jews of Khazaria (1st ed., Jason Aronson, 1999)
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