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Re: [sig] Csombor?

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  • Jenne Heise
    ... Thank you! -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@mail.browser.net disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me. It s no use
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 6 9:39 AM
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      > Indeed cza,ber (polish spelling ) or Latin Satureja hortensis is what
      > english speaking people call savory.
      > Art Plazewski.

      Thank you!

      --
      Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
      disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
      "It's no use trying to be clever-- we are all clever here; just try
      to be kind -- a little kind." F.J. Foakes-Jackson
    • vespirus@socrates.berkeley.edu
      ... You ve already gotten an answer, it seems, but I can verify that csombor is savory according to my dictionary of Hungarian plant names (No:ve/ny-
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 13 6:41 PM
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        > In _Food and Drink in Medieval Poland_, a reference is made to an herb
        > that seems to have been imported from Hungary with the recipe for
        > sauerbraten; the herb is called 'csombor'.
        > A google search and some dictionary diving suggests to me that csombor is
        > probably the herb called savory.

        You've already gotten an answer, it seems, but I can verify that 'csombor'
        is savory according to my dictionary of Hungarian plant names (No:ve/ny-
        neveink: Magyar-latin szo/gyu"jteme/ny, by Priszter Szaniszlo/).

        --Walraven
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