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Csombor?

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  • Jenne Heise
    In _Food and Drink in Medieval Poland_, a reference is made to an herb that seems to have been imported from Hungary with the recipe for sauerbraten; the herb
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 2, 2001
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      In _Food and Drink in Medieval Poland_, a reference is made to an herb
      that seems to have been imported from Hungary with the recipe for
      sauerbraten; the herb is called 'csombor'.
      A google search and some dictionary diving suggests to me that csombor is
      probably the herb called savory. Does anyone on the list have Polish or
      Hungarian expertise enough to verify or deny?

      --
      Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
      disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
      "It's no use trying to be clever-- we are all clever here; just try
      to be kind -- a little kind." F.J. Foakes-Jackson
    • Art Plazewski
      Indeed cza,ber (polish spelling ) or Latin Satureja hortensis is what english speaking people call savory. Art Plazewski. ... From: Jenne Heise
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 6, 2001
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        Indeed cza,ber (polish spelling ) or Latin Satureja hortensis is what
        english speaking people call savory.
        Art Plazewski.

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Jenne Heise [mailto:jenne@...]
        Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2001 4:47 PM
        To: sig@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [sig] Csombor?

        In _Food and Drink in Medieval Poland_, a reference is made to an herb
        that seems to have been imported from Hungary with the recipe for
        sauerbraten; the herb is called 'csombor'.
        A google search and some dictionary diving suggests to me that csombor
        is
        probably the herb called savory. Does anyone on the list have Polish or
        Hungarian expertise enough to verify or deny?

        --
        Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
        disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
        "It's no use trying to be clever-- we are all clever here; just try
        to be kind -- a little kind." F.J. Foakes-Jackson




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      • Jenne Heise
        ... Thank you! -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@mail.browser.net disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me. It s no use
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 6, 2001
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          > Indeed cza,ber (polish spelling ) or Latin Satureja hortensis is what
          > english speaking people call savory.
          > Art Plazewski.

          Thank you!

          --
          Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
          disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
          "It's no use trying to be clever-- we are all clever here; just try
          to be kind -- a little kind." F.J. Foakes-Jackson
        • vespirus@socrates.berkeley.edu
          ... You ve already gotten an answer, it seems, but I can verify that csombor is savory according to my dictionary of Hungarian plant names (No:ve/ny-
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 13, 2001
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            > In _Food and Drink in Medieval Poland_, a reference is made to an herb
            > that seems to have been imported from Hungary with the recipe for
            > sauerbraten; the herb is called 'csombor'.
            > A google search and some dictionary diving suggests to me that csombor is
            > probably the herb called savory.

            You've already gotten an answer, it seems, but I can verify that 'csombor'
            is savory according to my dictionary of Hungarian plant names (No:ve/ny-
            neveink: Magyar-latin szo/gyu"jteme/ny, by Priszter Szaniszlo/).

            --Walraven
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