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salo

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  • Anne M. McKinney
    I was only just exposed to salo two days ago, when my Russian instructor decided to feed me before my lesson. She says that she eats it when she wants to be
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 28, 2001
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      I was only just exposed to salo two days ago, when my Russian instructor
      decided to feed me before my lesson. She says that she eats it when she
      wants to be reminded of her home in Ukraine. She was able to explain that
      it was like smoked pork, and she got it here in the Midwest, but I still was
      not entirely sure what it was other than some kind of fatty smoked ham, like
      uncooked bacon. Is salo considered to be something universally essential to
      the Ukranian table? Is it really supposed to be more meat than fat, or more
      fat than meat? The idea that it was pork also threw me for a loop because
      my instructor and her family is Jewish, but maybe this would be a case of
      taste and social culture overriding religious or ethnic culture....? I am
      lost on this issue.

      --Sofya Chyudka
    • Jenn/Yana
      ... I ve seen salo (among other meats, sausages, and such) on sale at the Russian deli in Chicago (on Devon Ave, write me if you want directions). Definition
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 28, 2001
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        Sofya Chyudka wrote:

        >I was only just exposed to salo two days ago, when my Russian instructor
        >decided to feed me before my lesson. She says that she eats it when she
        >wants to be reminded of her home in Ukraine. She was able to explain that
        >it was like smoked pork, and she got it here in the Midwest, but I still was
        >not entirely sure what it was other than some kind of fatty smoked ham, like
        >uncooked bacon. Is salo considered to be something universally essential to
        >the Ukranian table? Is it really supposed to be more meat than fat, or more
        >fat than meat?

        I've seen salo (among other meats, sausages, and such) on sale at the
        Russian deli in Chicago (on Devon Ave, write me if you want directions).

        Definition of "salo" from <http://www.relc.com/kiev/food/efood1.htm>

        "This traditional appetizer, often a central
        part of ´┐ŻUkrainian toast", may be a bit
        alarming to visitors from more
        cholestoraI-conscious cultures, particularly
        if your first introduction is seeing thick white
        rolls on the butcher blocks at an open
        market. But the salted and sometimes
        smoked pork fat crowned by a chewy rind
        can be extremely tasty - in small quantities."

        >The idea that it was pork also threw me for a loop because
        >my instructor and her family is Jewish, but maybe this would be a case of
        >taste and social culture overriding religious or ethnic culture....? I am
        >lost on this issue.

        If her family doesn't keep strict kosher, then eating pork would be a valid
        option. If they do keep kosher, then I find it rather hard to believe that
        her Slavic culture would override her religious culture. Most of my Jewish
        friends only keep kosher on and around major holidays. Maybe this is what
        her family does too.

        --Yana
      • LiudmilaV@aol.com
        In a message dated 6/28/2001 5:02:34 PM Pacific Daylight Time, ... First let me explain that Jews eat pork? thing. In the former Soviet Union, Jewish was
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 28, 2001
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          In a message dated 6/28/2001 5:02:34 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
          agent_h@... writes:


          > Is salo considered to be something universally essential to
          > the Ukranian table? Is it really supposed to be more meat than fat, or more
          > fat than meat? The idea that it was pork also threw me for a loop because
          > my instructor and her family is Jewish, but maybe this would be a case of
          > taste and social culture overriding religious or ethnic culture....? I am
          > lost on this issue.
          >
          > --Sofya Chyudka
          >

          First let me explain that "Jews eat pork?" thing. In the former Soviet
          Union, Jewish was not a religion but an ethnicity (and I do believe that is
          what it really is). I suppose your instructor, like myself, believes herself
          to be Jewish, but is not religious and does not adhere to Judaism completely
          (most of us celebrate many Jewish festivals as a cultural thing). Thus, I
          eat salo, and so does she.

          Salo should be mostly fat, and proper salo is hard to get in the US. It is
          not essential to a Ukrainian table, but is (or at least was 10 years ago,
          before the collapse) found in most Ukrainian freezers. It would not be
          served for special occasions, but eaten at family meals, for example,
          accompanying mashed potatoes. Of course, when one is in another country and
          gets nostalgic, this kind of comfort food is special.

          Oh, and by the way -- I have never seen so many greatly obese people in
          Ukrainian as here, so salo is not as bad as french fries!

          Liudmila


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • MHoll@aol.com
          In a message dated 6/28/2001 7:02:43 PM Central Daylight Time, ... It s pretty much all fat. As to how central to Ukrainian cuisine it is, here s a funny
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 29, 2001
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            In a message dated 6/28/2001 7:02:43 PM Central Daylight Time,
            agent_h@... writes:


            > Is salo considered to be something universally essential to
            > the Ukranian table? Is it really supposed to be more meat than fat, or more
            > fat than meat?

            It's pretty much all fat. As to how central to Ukrainian cuisine it is,
            here's a funny little story from Ukraine:

            A man says: "When I am king, I will eat "salo" with "salo" [as opposed to
            with bread], and honey with honey [again, as opposed to as a sweetener]."

            Kings are supposed to enjoy the best foods -- does that answer the question?

            Predslava.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Robert J Welenc
            ... is, ... opposed to ... sweetener]. ... question? ... Or is that the Ukrainian peasant s idea of rich? Like the song from Fiddler on the Roof where
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 29, 2001
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              >It's pretty much all fat. As to how central to Ukrainian cuisine it
              is,
              >here's a funny little story from Ukraine:
              >
              >A man says: "When I am king, I will eat "salo" with "salo" [as
              opposed to
              >with bread], and honey with honey [again, as opposed to as a
              sweetener]."
              >
              >Kings are supposed to enjoy the best foods -- does that answer the
              question?
              >
              Or is that the Ukrainian peasant's idea of rich? Like the song from
              'Fiddler on the Roof' where Tevye sings 'If I Were a Rich Man'? Where
              'rich' means "a fine tin roof and a real wooden floor" and a yard
              filled with poultry!

              Alanna
              ***********
              Saying of the day: Give life -- give blood.
              My dear friends, I'm not allowed to donate blood any longer. Please
              call your local Red Cross and do it for me.
            • sergius
              What s known as salo sounds an awful lot like stoogin (phonetic spelling) It can be made with meat (pork or beef) or fish (using every thing but the scales and
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 1, 2001
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                What's known as salo sounds an awful lot like stoogin (phonetic spelling) It
                can be made with meat (pork or beef) or fish (using every thing but the
                scales and eyes, the latter being used for fish bait-nothing went to waste)
                In our family, generally an Easter treat, with horseradish or hot mustard. A
                melt in your mouth taste treat....for some. Sergei Bulutnikov
              • MHoll@aol.com
                In a message dated 7/1/2001 9:11:26 PM Central Daylight Time, ... What you are talkling about is studen (STOO-din), the same thing as kholodets
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 5, 2001
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                  In a message dated 7/1/2001 9:11:26 PM Central Daylight Time,
                  sergius@... writes:


                  > What's known as salo sounds an awful lot like stoogin (phonetic spelling) It
                  > can be made with meat (pork or beef) or fish (using every thing but the
                  > scales and eyes, the latter being used for fish bait-nothing went to waste)
                  > In our family, generally an Easter treat, with horseradish or hot mustard. A
                  >

                  What you are talkling about is "studen" (STOO-din), the same thing as
                  "kholodets" (khoh-loh-DEHTS), a meat or fish aspic. Yes, tasty. "Salo" is
                  basically salted lard, although in consistency and taste it's more like the
                  fat in bacon.

                  Predslava.


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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