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Re: [sig] Slavic Paganism & Troitsa (Pentecost)

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  • MHoll@aol.com
    First of all, yes, there were holidays at this time of the year, which appear to have been connected with spring, growth, and therefore fertility. Second, what
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 3, 2001
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      First of all, yes, there were holidays at this time of the year, which appear
      to have been connected with spring, growth, and therefore fertility.

      Second, what these rituals were and what they meant is absolutely unknown.
      Speculations in this area are wild and unfounded, even though a number of
      them are seductive in their use of 19-th and 20-th century folklore and
      ethnography. Such studies attempt to reconstruct something that was already
      some 1000 years in the past, undocumented, with no remnants that can be
      analyzed with any tiny amount of certainty.

      Chronicles seem to indicate that such pagan rituals contained dancing and
      singing and music, possibly ritual drunkenness. This can only be derived from
      the criticism by the Church of "ungodly" behavior. Further than that, where
      these rituals might have taken place, how they were conducted, exactly at
      what time of the year, remains unknown. And anyone purporting to reveal the
      truth about East Slavic paganism is either a fraud or a rather poor scholar.
      Even the names of the Slavic gods are under question: were they worshipped by
      the population at large? Were they imported and a religion of the Rurikids
      only? Are we actually right about the attributes we give them? Was there a
      caste or some kind of organization of priests? -- there are no signs of the
      latter.

      What may be remains of the pagan celebration at this time of the year are
      flowers and greenery everywhere -- in the churches, in the houses.

      In the 19th century (the tradition was gone by the 20th), the week before
      Trinity (Pentecost) was a week called "rusal'skaia nedelia" -- the "rusalka
      week" (the rusalka is a water-spirit that can also be a field-spirit, who can
      influence the fertility of the fields). There were games, dressing-up,
      decorating trees with ribbons and dancing around them (girls only), and so
      forth. Of course, it would seem that such traditions come from the furthest
      antiquity, but the operative word here is "seem". There is NO WAY to link
      with any certainty, much less any accuracy with any pagan rituals that may
      have been performed once.

      For more on folk beliefs and rituals I recommend the following books:

      _Russian Folk Belief_ by Linda Ivanits.
      and
      _The Bathhouse at Midnight_ (I forgot the name of the author, but it's a
      recent book and fairly easy to find).

      Predslava.
      Getting off her soap box and her teaching stand.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • sergius
      Just as a thought, Troi itsa (Trinity Sunday) was/is supposed to be the day Christ takes the ice from the water. (No swimming, boating, fishing between ice out
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 3, 2001
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        Just as a thought, Troi'itsa (Trinity Sunday) was/is supposed to be the day
        Christ takes the ice from the water. (No swimming, boating, fishing between
        ice out and today) I am only giving this as an example of folk beliefs who's
        origins are lost, not as a pagan rooted idea; The only reason I put this out
        is to find out if there is any other similar belief known by those of this
        list. Without a reliable source or four (verification) I don't think any
        claim to know what the beliefs were pre-Christianity, but pagan is as pagan
        does, so have at it, just DO NOT claim ant authenticity. The research is
        serious, the role play for fun. Sergius Bulutinkov
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