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Re: [sig] Klobuky

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  • V. J. Boitchenko
    Hello Ed! You are getting confused with the English terms. The Russians call themselves the Russkiy (literally: of the Rus), the Orthodox Patriarch is the
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 23, 2001
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      Hello Ed!

      You are getting confused with the English terms. The Russians call themselves the Russkiy (literally: of the Rus), the Orthodox Patriarch is the Patriarch of Moscow and all the Rus (Vseya Rusi), the Carpatho-Russians call themselves Rusyns till this day (same as Russkiy) and their language since recently is not considered a dialect of the Ukrainian. The country is however Rossiya and not Rus.

      What you are saying is very ironic, especially considering that all the Rurikovichi moved to Great (Moscow) Rus.

      Venceslav
    • Dmitriy V. Ryaboy
      Greetings Mr. White Croat -- I am either Mr Ryaboy, or Lord Shelomianin, but not visa versa :). The URL that finally got through to the list a few hours ago
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 23, 2001
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        Greetings Mr. White Croat
        -- I am either Mr Ryaboy, or Lord Shelomianin, but not visa versa :).
        The URL that finally got through to the list a few hours ago that leads to
        the images of the face-mask helms are what I referred to as "cool armour".

        I am interested by your mension of permanent Black Klobuk garrisons in the
        city of Kiev -- can you provide more info about that, as well as the
        intermarriage you mention? While I have seen at least a dozen cases of
        Kuman-Rus intermarriage, and a few of Pecheneg-Rus intermarriage, I do not
        specifically recall Black Klobuk-Rus unions.

        Thanks for looking up klobuck in the Ukranian dictionary -- hood makes some
        sense. It would be interesting to find images of what they actually wore,
        though.


        As for your criticism of use of Russian derivatives -- using modern Ukranian
        is no more accurate than using modern Russian. If you want to refer to
        places the way they were referred to in period, we need to get some new
        dictionaries :). Most of my sources are in Russian -- hence the Russian
        names for cities & people in my messages.

        -Dmitriy "Shelomianin" Ryaboy.

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      • dbonk@town.ci.chapel-hill.nc.us
        To be entirely correct in the medieval period the area you describe should be described as Ruthenia rather than the Ukraine. DB
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 24, 2001
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          To be entirely correct in the medieval period the area you describe
          should be described as Ruthenia rather than the Ukraine.

          DB
        • Robert J Welenc
          ... klobuk ... that is ... (as the ... Although riding off to war with a chicken on one s head presents an . . . *interesting* picture! Alanna ***********
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 25, 2001
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            > Being intruiged by the "Black Caps"/"Chorny Klobuky", I looked up
            "klobuk"
            >in my Ukrainian-English dictionary. Two meanings - fowl and hood,
            that is
            >all. It could be safe to infer that the Black Caps or Karakalpaks
            (as the
            >Golden Horde Khan had called them) wore hoods.

            Although riding off to war with a chicken on one's head presents an .
            . . *interesting* picture!


            Alanna
            ***********
            Saying of the day: Those who fail to prepare, prepare to fail.
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