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Lithuanian in _The Jungle_

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  • Anne M. McKinney
    Greetings! For my American Lit. class I am currently reading Upton Sinclair s _The Jungle_, which is a novel about Lithuanian immigrants working in Chicago s
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 19, 2001
      Greetings! For my American Lit. class I am currently reading Upton
      Sinclair's _The Jungle_, which is a novel about Lithuanian immigrants
      working in Chicago's turn-of-the-century meat-packing industry. Since a
      couple of the names leap out at me because of their similarity to Russian
      root words, I was wondering if someone onlist who knows Lithuanian might be
      able to translate some of the names for me, if they have significant
      meanings. Most of them I believe are just names, but if they mean anything
      special I would be very interested in that information:

      Jurgis Rudkus
      Ona Lukoszaite (as a woman's name--would this be a variation of Anna, or
      closer to "she"?)
      Stanislovas
      Tamoszius Kuszleika
      Jokubas Szedvilas
      Marija Berczynskas
      Grandmother Majauszkiene
      Ostrinski

      Also, would it be correct to assume that "Dede" and "Tete" mean "Uncle" and
      "Aunt", and can be used to addressed non-related members of the family (in
      addition to blood aunts and uncles)?

      Any and all information is appreciated. Thanks in advance,
      --Anne McKinney
    • Anthony J. Bryant
      ... Jurgis is the Lithuanian form of George (Yurii or Georgii in Rus.) ... I can t think of an English equivalent, but I m reminded of the name Una ... This
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 20, 2001
        Anne M. McKinney wrote:

        >
        > Greetings! For my American Lit. class I am currently reading Upton
        > Sinclair's _The Jungle_, which is a novel about Lithuanian immigrants
        > working in Chicago's turn-of-the-century meat-packing industry. Since a
        > couple of the names leap out at me because of their similarity to Russian
        > root words, I was wondering if someone onlist who knows Lithuanian might be
        > able to translate some of the names for me, if they have significant
        > meanings. Most of them I believe are just names, but if they mean anything
        > special I would be very interested in that information:
        >
        > Jurgis Rudkus

        Jurgis is the Lithuanian form of George (Yurii or Georgii in Rus.)

        >
        > Ona Lukoszaite (as a woman's name--would this be a variation of Anna, or
        > closer to "she"?)

        I can't think of an English equivalent, but I'm reminded of the name "Una"

        >
        > Stanislovas

        This is of course Stanislav/Stanislaw (also in Russian, from a Polish name).

        >
        > Tamoszius Kuszleika

        I'd guess Timothy (Timofei in Russ) but I can't swear to it.

        >
        > Jokubas Szedvilas

        Jacob (Rus: Yakov)

        >
        > Marija Berczynskas

        Mary


        Effingham
      • Purple Kat
        ... I don t know Lithuanian, but some of these names are familiar to me from my Polish Studies. Hope the info helps. Katheryne ... Stanislaus - Stanley ...
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 20, 2001
          At 4/20/2001 12:55 AM, you wrote:
          ><snip>

          I don't know Lithuanian, but some of these names are familiar to me from my
          Polish Studies. Hope the info helps.
          Katheryne

          >Jurgis Rudkus
          >Ona Lukoszaite (as a woman's name--would this be a variation of Anna, or
          >closer to "she"?)
          >Stanislovas

          Stanislaus - Stanley

          >Tamoszius Kuszleika

          Thomas

          >Jokubas Szedvilas

          Jakob - Jacob

          >Marija Berczynskas

          Maria - Mary

          >Grandmother Majauszkiene
          >Ostrinski
          >
          >Also, would it be correct to assume that "Dede" and "Tete" mean "Uncle" and
          >"Aunt", and can be used to addressed non-related members of the family (in
          >addition to blood aunts and uncles)?
          >
          >Any and all information is appreciated. Thanks in advance,
          >--Anne McKinney
        • Parsla Liepa
          ... I don t speak Lithuanian, but I do speak Latvian, which is close enough . (I ve managed to have a conversation where I was speaking
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 20, 2001
            > Also, would it be correct to assume that "Dede" and "Tete" mean "Uncle" and
            > "Aunt", and can be used to addressed non-related members of the family (in
            > addition to blood aunts and uncles)?

            I don't speak Lithuanian, but I do speak Latvian, which is "close
            enough". (I've managed to have a conversation where I was speaking
            half-Latvian-half-English, he was speaking half-Lithuanian-half-English,
            and we understood another perfectly.)

            I agree whole-heartedly with the previous responses.

            In Latvian, "Tete" is what you would call any older father-figure type; be
            it a father, uncle, godfather, etc.

            Parsla
          • Parsla Liepa
            More Latvian extrapolation.... ... Probably Anna. ... This surname makes me think of the Latvian name Berzins , meaning of the birches .
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 20, 2001
              More Latvian extrapolation....

              > Ona Lukoszaite (as a woman's name--would this be a variation of Anna, or
              > closer to "she"?)

              Probably Anna.

              > Marija Berczynskas

              This surname makes me think of the Latvian name "Berzins", meaning "of the
              birches".
            • Alastair Millar
              The pedant in me notes that Jokubas = Jacob, but that James is equally acceptable in English. (Heb. Jacob - Latin Jacobus - LL Jacomus - forms using m,
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 21, 2001
                The pedant in me notes that Jokubas = Jacob, but that James is equally
                acceptable in English.
                (Heb. Jacob -> Latin Jacobus -> LL Jacomus -> forms using m, according to
                the back of Chambers' Dictionary...)

                Cheers

                A.

                ---------------------------
                Alastair Millar, BSc(Hons)
                Consultancy and translation for the heritage industry
                e-mail: alastair@..., http://www.skriptorium.cz
                P.O.Box 685, CZ 111 21 Prague 1, Czech Republic
              • Anne M. McKinney
                Thank you to everyone who responded in this thread. Both I and my professor are grateful! ^_^ --Anne McKinney
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 23, 2001
                  Thank you to everyone who responded in this thread. Both I and my professor
                  are grateful! ^_^

                  --Anne McKinney
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