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Re: [sig] please help

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  • MHoll@aol.com
    The Polovetsians (what the Russians called them), or Cumans (Kumans -- what the Byzantines called them), of Kipchaqs (apparently, what they called themselves),
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 15, 2001
      The Polovetsians (what the Russians called them), or Cumans (Kumans -- what
      the Byzantines called them), of Kipchaqs (apparently, what they called
      themselves), were a Turkic people, a number of nomadic tribes that pretty
      much dominated the steppes south-east of Russia until the Mongols came in the
      XIII century.

      There is quite a bit of information out there on them, but mostly about their
      political, strategic, dynastic importance to Russia. I haven't found anything
      in English about their lives, beliefs, lifestyle, the role and place of
      women, or even about their clothing.

      I have found some information in Russian, but I'm still waiting on
      interlibrary loan to bring it to me.

      If anyone is aware of scholarship on those subjects by Western scholars, I
      would be very grateful for a pointer.

      *****************************
      Predslava Vydrina
      Per fess embattled azure and gules, two otters passant or.
      <A HREF="http://members.aol.com/Predslava/RussianHistoryTriviaPage.html">Russian History Trivia Page</A>
      (http://members.aol.com/Predslava/RussianHistoryTriviaPage.html)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dmitriy V. Ryaboy
      ... There is indeed a sad lack of such information in English (though i can cite for you a number of interesting Russian titles). The one book I ran into
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 15, 2001
        Predslava wrote:
        >The Polovetsians (what the Russians called them), or Cumans (Kumans -->what
        >the Byzantines called them), of Kipchaqs (apparently, what they called
        >themselves), were a Turkic people, a number of nomadic tribes that pretty
        >much dominated the steppes south-east of Russia until the Mongols came in
        >the XIII century.
        >I haven't found anything in English about their lives, beliefs, lifestyle,
        >the role and place of women, or even about their clothing.
        >If anyone is aware of scholarship on those subjects by Western scholars, I
        >would be very grateful for a pointer.


        There is indeed a sad lack of such information in English (though i can
        cite for you a number of interesting Russian titles). The one book I ran
        into that is in English is:
        "Pechenegs, Cumans, Iasians. Steppe peoples in medieval Hungary." Andras
        Paloczi Horvath, Corvina, Budapest, 1989. ISSN 0133-3119 ISBN 963 13 2740 X

        -Dmitriy Shelomianin

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      • IRLIZARD@aol.com
        Any information/sites/help I can get(concerning Polovetsians/Khersones) would be appreciated Thanks Gemella
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 15, 2001
          Any information/sites/help I can get(concerning Polovetsians/Khersones)
          would be appreciated
          Thanks
          Gemella
          <<
          The Polovetsians (what the Russians called them), or Cumans (Kumans -- what
          the Byzantines called them), of Kipchaqs (apparently, what they called
          themselves), were a Turkic people, a number of nomadic tribes that pretty
          much dominated the steppes south-east of Russia until the Mongols came in
          the
          XIII century. >>
        • Dmitriy V. Ryaboy
          Almost forgot -- here is a link to the article about a nomad, possibly Polovets (kipchak, Cuman.. yeah, those guys) armour:
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 15, 2001
            Almost forgot -- here is a link to the article about a nomad, possibly
            Polovets (kipchak, Cuman.. yeah, those guys) armour:

            http://tgorod.go.ru/index.shtml?librar0027a

            This is the same article I posted a while ago, but the site has moved things
            around quite a bit, so the url is new.

            I am afraid the translation is somewhat awkward -- I did it a year ago, and
            didn't proof-read.. guess I should revise it, eh? Anyway, hope you can find
            it useful.

            -Dmitriy Shelomianin
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