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new mother panick question

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  • LiudmilaV@aol.com
    Hello, I am going to attend a local event with my 2-month old daughter this weekend, and neither of us have what to wear. That is, I have plenty of garb, but
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 27, 2001
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      Hello,

      I am going to attend a local event with my 2-month old daughter this weekend,
      and neither of us have what to wear. That is, I have plenty of garb, but it
      is all of over-the-head variety, and the only one I've made in advance with a
      nursing opening goes with a heavily pearled collar, so that my baby won't be
      able to use my shoulder as she likes. My rubakhi (undershirts) all have
      small openings at neckline, as I believe they had in period. So, have any
      ladies on the list tried nursing in Russian garb? What adjustments did you
      have to make? What do you think they did in period (other than hiring a wet
      nurse)?

      Also, did anyone try making anything other than a shirt for a baby? Period
      practice was to swaddle them, of course, but that won't do with mine -- we
      had to stop weeks ago as she wriggled out of her blankets at night all the
      time. I will attempt to make her a rubakha (have a photo of a very late
      period boy's shirt) if she lets me. Any advise?

      Liudmila,
      happy but panicked new mama.
    • John H. McCartney
      ... Well, what we did when ours were tiny, was this - a basic long shirt/ gown type undergarment. Then we made multiple rectangular panels about shoulder width
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 27, 2001
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        > Also, did anyone try making anything other than a shirt for a baby? Period
        > practice was to swaddle them, of course, but that won't do with mine -- we
        > had to stop weeks ago as she wriggled out of her blankets at night all the
        > time. I will attempt to make her a rubakha (have a photo of a very late
        > period boy's shirt) if she lets me. Any advise?

        Well, what we did when ours were tiny, was this - a basic long shirt/
        gown type undergarment. Then we made multiple rectangular panels about
        shoulder width x body length, with trim around the edges and buttonholes
        at the two corners on one narrow end. Add a short tie to the middle of
        each long side, and a pair of short straps with a button on each end (we
        justed some more of the trim).

        Just button two panels together with the straps, over the head and tie
        the sides. Then, when baby decorates the front with used milk, simply
        swap out the soiled panel with another. (As you might guess, a heavy
        fabric works best for this.) Make several sets of panels, and a few
        of the undergarments, and you're set; convienence and fashion! :-)


        Eoin
      • Jenn/Yana
        Okay, first off, CONGRATULATIONS!!!! ... I have seen women who wear Viking do like this: make your undershirt/rubakha opening much longer so that the baby can
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 27, 2001
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          Okay, first off, CONGRATULATIONS!!!!

          >I am going to attend a local event with my 2-month old daughter this weekend,
          >and neither of us have what to wear. That is, I have plenty of garb, but it
          >is all of over-the-head variety, and the only one I've made in advance with a
          >nursing opening goes with a heavily pearled collar, so that my baby won't be
          >able to use my shoulder as she likes. My rubakhi (undershirts) all have
          >small openings at neckline, as I believe they had in period. So, have any
          >ladies on the list tried nursing in Russian garb? What adjustments did you
          >have to make? What do you think they did in period (other than hiring a wet
          >nurse)?

          I have seen women who wear Viking do like this: make your
          undershirt/rubakha opening much longer so that the baby can comfortably
          reach the nipple (fasten it with a few loops and buttons, so it doesn't
          flop open when you don't want it to), and make or wear an outergarment
          (Viking apron dress, sarafan, navershnik, etc) that is roomy enough to
          slide the baby underneath. Modesty and sun-protection in one blow.
          Alternatively, draping a shawl over yourself and the baby works as well.

          I assume that in period, the women who did not use wet nurses simply nursed
          in public without calling too much attention to themselves, or retreated to
          a private spot to nurse (less distractions for mother and baby that way,
          anyway). I don't believe I've ever seen any images or text mentioning
          nursing clothing or habits. I'll have to check my 19th century sources,
          and maybe extrapolate.


          >Also, did anyone try making anything other than a shirt for a baby?

          A rubakha sounds great. Easier to diaper her (in a period or non-period
          way), and if you allow room to grow, it should last you a long(er) time.
          All the early modern Russian pictures (of peasants, anyway) that I have
          seen of very young children (sex not mentioned) just show them wearing long
          shirts, with very little decoration. I don't think I've ever seen a
          picture/image of a baby that wasn't swaddled.

          --Yana
        • Jenne Heise
          ... Turkish and Greenland clothing has been found with two button-hole like openings in front of the undergarments at, well, approximately the right place.
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 27, 2001
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            > I assume that in period, the women who did not use wet nurses simply nursed
            > in public without calling too much attention to themselves, or retreated to
            > a private spot to nurse (less distractions for mother and baby that way,
            > anyway). I don't believe I've ever seen any images or text mentioning
            > nursing clothing or habits. I'll have to check my 19th century sources,
            > and maybe extrapolate.

            Turkish and Greenland clothing has been found with two button-hole like
            openings in front of the undergarments at, well, approximately the right
            place. Because of the nature of the overgarments used with them, the
            overgarment could be unfastened and the baby 'attached' through the slit.
            Obviously, even in private, one would not want to disrobe too much in
            order to breastfeed, simply because it's drafty!

            --
            Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
            disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
            "The worst thing I can say of a person is, 'they couldn't be bothered'."
          • Lente
            Congratulations! Hmm, swaddling looks great in pictures but isn t very practical with our wiggle worm babies is it? I ended up making a lot of little tunics
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 27, 2001
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              Congratulations!

              Hmm, swaddling looks great in pictures but isn't very practical with our
              wiggle worm babies is it? I ended up making a lot of little tunics for my
              daughter, of course I was in the midst of changing from a Celtic persona to
              a Magyar persona and just wanted some stuff that was quasi-periodish. The
              rubaska sounds good for your baby. Make them out of natural fabrics, much
              easier on baby's air-conditioning/heating system.

              Could you just make a new collar without much pearling for your outfit you
              already have made? Or do you have a short rubasha (shirt) that you could
              wear under one of the apron dress thingy's (can you tell Russian isn't my
              forte?), that when it came time for feeding you would just adjust the apron
              dress down and the shirt up until baby could eat and cover all with a shawl
              or blanket? I seriously cheated and just had a tabard that I wore over
              button front tunics of my husband's for the first events we attended. I
              think I finally got something made specifically for nursing when my child
              was 6 months old.

              Kathws Rusa
            • LiudmilaV@aol.com
              My sincere thanks for the congratulations and advise, I got some ideas from this and will try them this week, assuming that the baby will cooperate and let me
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 27, 2001
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                My sincere thanks for the congratulations and advise, I got some ideas from
                this and will try them this week, assuming that the baby will cooperate and
                let me sew. I especially liked that panel outfit, Eoin -- I was thinking
                that I'd have to make at least two rubakhas for this event to change her if
                needed, but this should work great!

                Liudmila
              • Robert J Welenc
                ... Most European cultures in period (and beyond) believed that you had to swaddle babies so that they would grow straight. If you think about it, it makes
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 28, 2001
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                  >I don't think I've ever seen a
                  >picture/image of a baby that wasn't swaddled.
                  >
                  Most European cultures in period (and beyond) believed that you had
                  to swaddle babies so that they would grow straight. If you think
                  about it, it makes some kind of sense. A newborn will frequently
                  curl up into a ball, the way he was in the womb -- swaddling
                  'uncurled' him!

                  There is a period mention by an English writer about how shocking it
                  was that the Irish didn't swaddle their babies, and yet somehow the
                  children grew up all right!

                  Alanna
                  ***********
                  Saying of the day: Taste makes waist.
                • LiudmilaV@aol.com
                  In a message dated 3/28/2001 9:03:55 AM Pacific Standard Time, rjwelenc@erols.com writes:
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 28, 2001
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                    In a message dated 3/28/2001 9:03:55 AM Pacific Standard Time,
                    rjwelenc@... writes:

                    << Most European cultures in period (and beyond) believed that you had
                    to swaddle babies so that they would grow straight. If you think
                    about it, it makes some kind of sense. A newborn will frequently
                    curl up into a ball, the way he was in the womb -- swaddling
                    'uncurled' him! >>

                    Actually, in Russia and Ukraine, at least until I left the country 6 years
                    ago, all babies were still swaddled tight. My aunt expressed her concern a
                    couple of days ago that my baby might end up with crooked legs because we are
                    not straightening them with proper swaddling. For her, and for other women
                    who had kids back there, seeing American infants in cute little outfits was a
                    cultural shock. In any case, my daughter can't stand swaddling now, so she'd
                    have to be dressed in un-period way...

                    Liudmila
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