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Re: [sig] Temple Rings

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  • LiudmilaV@aol.com
    In a message dated 2/17/2001 4:20:20 PM Pacific Standard Time, slavic@mailbag.com writes:
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 18, 2001
      In a message dated 2/17/2001 4:20:20 PM Pacific Standard Time,
      slavic@... writes:

      << According to the book in front of me, the enamel-work items you are
      describing are called "kolty" (kolt, singular), and the plain metal items
      are temple rings (visochnye kol'tsa). Since they both hang from a
      headdress of some sort, I guess the only difference (that we know of) is
      what they look like. >>

      Actually, they are more different from each other than that. Temple rings
      were flat metal pieces, and could be worn in the hair as well as on a
      headdress. There was a lot of regional variety in their design. For example,
      for Slovenie in Novgorod they were made as large rings with diamond-shaped
      decorations. Viatichi, residents of the Oka valley, wore seven (3 on one side
      of the face and 4 on the other) seven-bladed rings. West of them, Radimichi
      wore similar temple rings with seven beams on each. Still farther west,
      Severyanie wore temple rings made of wire spirals. In many tribes, women wore
      one or two small wire rings, while Drevlyanie, who lived in the Volyn region,
      wore multiples of such rings. In Polesie, Dregovichi wore temple rings with
      added granulated copper beads. Beginning in the XIIth century, the temple
      rings started to loose their regional specificity. For example, temple rings
      with three smooth or lacy beads, produced in Kiev, were known all over the
      Ancient Rus' territory.
      Kotly, on the other hand, were hollow metal ornaments (shaped something
      like closed clamshells or flat balls) decorated with enamel, granulation, or
      blackening, and secured to the headdress at the temples. They developed later
      than the temple rings, and were worn primarily by city women.
      Most of this information is from:
      Rabinovich, M. G. Drevnerusskaia odezhda IX-XIII vv. (Ancient Russian dress
      of IX-XIII cc.). In Rabinovich, M. G. (ed.) Drevniaia Odezhda Narodov
      Vostochnoy Evropy. Nauka, Moskow, 1986, pp. 40-62.
      (this volume also has pictures of many regional varieties of the temple rings)

      Liudmila
    • Jenn/Yana
      Thank you Liudmila, for this clarification! The book I was looking at was an art book , with very little text. Nice pics, though. --Yana ... something
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 18, 2001
        Thank you Liudmila, for this clarification! The book I was looking at was
        an "art book", with very little text. Nice pics, though.

        --Yana

        >Actually, they are more different from each other than that. Temple rings
        >were flat metal pieces, and could be worn in the hair as well as on a
        >headdress.

        > Kotly [sic], on the other hand, were hollow metal ornaments (shaped
        something
        >like closed clamshells or flat balls) decorated with enamel, granulation, or
        >blackening, and secured to the headdress at the temples. They developed later
        >than the temple rings, and were worn primarily by city women.

        >Liudmila
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