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Re: [sig] Russian hats -- long

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  • LiudmilaV@aol.com
    In a message dated 1/18/2001 3:33:10 PM Pacific Standard Time, ksenia.is@home.com writes:
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 18, 2001
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      In a message dated 1/18/2001 3:33:10 PM Pacific Standard Time,
      ksenia.is@... writes:

      << Can anyone tell me the difference between a kokoshnik and a kika?

      Ksenia
      ________ >>

      I can try. The following is a direct quote from my Collegium class notes, the
      late period headwear part. If anyone wants details on cited sources, let me
      know, but beware -- they are all in Russian. I begin with ubrus, in response
      to earlier discussion about veils. Note that all headdresses listed here are
      for married women.


      Ubrus, one of the most ancient Russian head coverings, was an embroidered
      rectangle of linen or silk (usually red or white) closely draped around the
      head, with the ends left dangling over the woman's shoulders in front and
      back. Special decorative pins were used to hold the ubrus in place
      (Giliarovskaia, p. 100). A XVIth century ubrus of Anastasia Romanovna, first
      wife of Ivan the Terrible, is made of scarlet taffeta 2 meters long. In the
      front middle part it is adorned with a blue silk damask rectangle, 40 cm long
      and 16 cm wide. This rectangle, "ochel'ie," is richly embroidered in pearls
      and gold with enameled inserts. The embroidery runs along the main body of
      the ubrus towards its ends. The ends themselves are trimmed with the endings
      made of 36.5 cm of the same fabric with slightly different embroidery
      (Iakunina, p. 74 and Figure 32). Unfortunately, my source does not allow
      establishing the width of the ubrus
      When the ubrus was not worn, a married woman's head was often adorned
      with a "kika." A kika was a soft cap surrounded by a hard "podzor" - a strip
      of varied width and shape, often wider on top. According to Giliarovskaia (p.
      101), fish paste was used to glue plain fabric to a stiff foundation, all of
      which was then covered in satin or other silk fabric. The front of the podzor
      (mentioned earlier chelo) was decorated as richly as the owner's income
      allowed. At the back a piece of velvet or a sable skin covered the nape of
      the neck, while at the front pearl riasy and a podniz emphasized the
      whiteness of the wearer's skin.
      "Soroka" and "kokoshnik" are the headdresses mentioned in XVI-XVIIth
      century written sources, but the details of their construction in period can
      only be inferred from headdresses of the same names worn in Russia through
      the XIXth century (Rabinovich, p. 81). Rabinovich also suggests that some
      kind of stiff-based headwear similar to a kokoshnik existed before the XIIIth
      century, even if it was not known by that name. Sosnina and Shangina (p. 309)
      refer to soroka as to one of the most ancient Russian headdresses, spread all
      over Rus' since the XIIth century. They describe post-period soroki as
      multi-part headdresses incorporating a plain kika-like hat in various shapes
      covered with a fancy shell, soroka proper. Like kika, it included a
      pozatylnik. Soroka was sewn of several parts, known as "chelo," wings, and a
      tail, the word "soroka" itself means "magpie" in Russian.
      While soroki could be of any shape in any region, Sosnina and Shangina
      (p. 117) describe 4 territorial types of kokoshniki. In Central Russia
      (Moscow, Vladimir, etc.) there existed three variations of a single-horned
      kokoshnik. The best known and probably oldest version had a soft back and a
      high, hard front shaped like a crescent with rounded edges or sharp edges
      lowered to the shoulders. The front of such a kokoshnik was adorned with gold
      and pearl embroidery, and sometimes with gemstones. The back was also
      commonly embroidered in gold. Single-horned kokoshniki usually had pearl
      podniz attached to cover the forehead almost to the eyebrows. In the
      North-West (Novgorod, Tver', etc.) kokoshniki were cylindrical, or
      pillbox-shaped. They also had podnizi, and pozatylniki (like kiki), as well
      as small earflaps. The third type of kokoshniki also existed in some Northern
      regions, though not widely spread (and most likely not at all in period).
      Such a kokoshnik had a flat oval top, a protuberance over the forehead,
      earflaps, podniz, and a pozatylnik. Finally, in the South, a kokoshnik was
      two-ridged, or saddle-like. Its top was slightly elevated in the front and
      higher in the back, like a saddle. It was worn in combination with a
      "nalobnik" - a narrow strip of ornamental fabric tied around the head, as
      well as a pozatylnik. This type of kokoshnik also does not appear to be
      period. All 4 types in the XIII-XIXth centuries were commonly worn with
      "platok," a square of decorative fabric, which leads to a suggestion that
      period forms of them could be worn with ubrus or other similar head
      coverings. It is worth noting that kokoshniki were considered to be very
      fancy headdresses, and were highly valued and passed down through
      generations.
    • Kate Jones
      Heya! So I m reading through Sofya la Rus s marvelous page on Russian women s dress, again, being a bit bored, and I come across mention of letniks being from
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 12, 2001
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        Heya!

        So I'm reading through Sofya la Rus's marvelous page on Russian
        women's dress, again, being a bit bored, and I come across mention of
        letniks being from the late Kievan Rus period. They're apparently
        mentioned in the will of 'the Verejski and Beloozero Prince Mikhail
        Andreevich'. Anyone know when this was from? I'm thinking about making
        one and I want to see if it's too late for my persona...

        Also, does anyone have any idea on the navershnik question I asked a
        few weeks ago?

        Kat'ryna
        --
        Kate Jones | I turned my world upside-down
        kate@... | and that's how everything landed...
      • Kate Jones
        ... Oh well - way too late for me, then. ... Hey, it s great stuff. Kat ryna -- Kate Jones | I turned my world upside-down
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 13, 2001
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          Kies, Lisa sez:
          >
          > "In the 14-15th cent. the loose stepped silhouette of clothing, emphasizing
          > the "grace" (statnost') of Russian women, endured little change. Innovation
          > affected the attire of rural inhabitants less of all... For noble city
          > dwellers, boyarinas, and princesses instead of the gown appeared letniki,
          > "koreli", and "opashni". "
          > -from Pushkareva, Natalia. Zhenshchiny drevney Rusi. 1989. Translated by
          > Lisa Kies.

          Oh well - way too late for me, then.

          > P.S. Thank you for the compliment.

          Hey, it's great stuff.

          Kat'ryna
          --
          Kate Jones | I turned my world upside-down
          kate@... | and that's how everything landed...
        • Kate Jones
          ... Huh - I _did_ get it twice, once directly to my address, and once from the SIG list. So one of em got through, anyway... Weird-oid. Kat ryna -- Kate Jones
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 13, 2001
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            Kies, Lisa sez:
            >
            > Thank you for posting this little exerpt. I've tried five times now to
            > reply to the SIG list, and none of them have come through. My version of
            > Netscape is very buggy. At least now I know that the main recipient got the
            > message. Hopefully, you haven't gotten too many duplicate responses. ;)

            Huh - I _did_ get it twice, once directly to my address, and once from
            the SIG list. So one of 'em got through, anyway...

            Weird-oid.

            Kat'ryna
            --
            Kate Jones | I turned my world upside-down
            kate@... | and that's how everything landed...
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