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Mor. Wallachian origins again

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  • Alastair Millar
    Well, make of this one what you will - I make no comment one way or the other... I was talking to a Czech historian the other day, and he astonished me by
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 24, 2000
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      Well, make of this one what you will - I make no comment one way or the
      other...

      I was talking to a Czech historian the other day, and he astonished me by
      mentioning that in parts of Moravian Wallachia the tradition survives of
      sword dancing almost identical to that performed by the Scots and Irish...
      Seeing my surprise he said "well, one theory is that the Wallachian (Vlach)
      people were just a remnant Celtic group..."

      Yrs aye

      Alastair

      ---------------------------
      Alastair Millar, BSc(Hons)
      Consultancy and translation for the heritage industry
      e-mail: alastair@..., http://www.skriptorium.cz
      P.O.Box 685, CZ 111 21 Prague 1, Czech Republic
    • Laron.... Just Laron.
      ... *snip* What an Interesting theory... *makes a mental note to do a little studying.* It almost makes sense... seeing as the Celts were a conquering people
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 24, 2000
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        >...one theory is that the Wallachian (Vlach)
        > people were just a remnant Celtic group..."
        *snip*
        What an Interesting theory... *makes a mental note to do a little studying.*
        It almost makes sense... seeing as the Celts were a conquering people up
        until what, the 600's?

        Laron
      • Mstislav
        ... Mstislav de-lurks for a moment.... Isn t it equally possible, perhaps even more probable, that it s the other way around? The Celts were a conquering
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 25, 2000
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          Alastair Millar wrote:

          > Well, make of this one what you will - I make no comment one way or the
          > other...
          >
          > I was talking to a Czech historian the other day, and he astonished me by
          > mentioning that in parts of Moravian Wallachia the tradition survives of
          > sword dancing almost identical to that performed by the Scots and Irish...
          > Seeing my surprise he said "well, one theory is that the Wallachian (Vlach)
          > people were just a remnant Celtic group..."
          >
          > Yrs aye
          >
          > Alastair

          Mstislav de-lurks for a moment....

          Isn't it equally possible, perhaps even more probable, that it's the other way
          around? The Celts were a conquering people, but so were the
          Scythians/Sarmatians, who may well be among the "parents" of the Vlachs and
          Celts both. The Vlachs may have traditions similar to the Celts simply
          because they share blood going back to the Scyths, whose artwork is well
          reflected in both cultures (and many others).

          Just a thought
        • catweasle
          ... From: Laron.... Just Laron. To: Sent: Friday, November 24, 2000 6:51 PM Subject: Re: [sig] Mor. Wallachian origins
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 25, 2000
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Laron.... Just Laron." <laron@...>
            To: <sig@egroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, November 24, 2000 6:51 PM
            Subject: Re: [sig] Mor. Wallachian origins again


            > >...one theory is that the Wallachian (Vlach)
            > > people were just a remnant Celtic group..."
            > *snip*
            > What an Interesting theory... *makes a mental note to do a little
            studying.*
            > It almost makes sense... seeing as the Celts were a conquering people up
            > until what, the 600's?
            >
            > Laron

            Yeah, I wonder if they could be a remnant or an offshoot of the Anatolian
            Celts - the famous Galacians [Gauls;] of the bible?
            Galacia that ancient district in central Anatolia that was occupied early in
            the 3rd century BC by Celtic tribes, whose bands of marauders created havoc
            among neighbouring Hellenistic states. Invited from Europe to participate in
            a Bithynian civil war (278 BC), the Gallic horde plagued western Anatolia
            until checked by the Seleucid king Antiochus I at the so-called Elephant
            Battle (275 BC). At that point the Celts, called Galatae (Galatians) by
            3rd-century writers, settled in the territory to which they gave their name.
            The Galatians, having joined the Seleucids against Rome (winter 190-189 BC),
            brought upon themselves a Roman punitive expedition (189 BC) from which they
            never recovered. Passing successively under the rule of Pergamum and Pontus,
            Galatia became a Roman protectorate (85 BC) ruled by puppet kings. Though
            originally possessing a strong cultural identity, the Galatians by the 2nd
            century AD had become absorbed into the Hellenistic civilization of
            Anatolia.

            best wishes,
            Catweasle
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