Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Re: Vlachs (long)

Expand Messages
  • Alastair Millar
    Catweasle wrote... ... You re most welcome... but I confess that you caught me on a good day, I m not nearly so gentlemanly IRL! (or on the list most of the
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 3, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Catweasle wrote...

      >Thank you for the erudite, detailed and gentlemanly reply.

      You're most welcome... but I confess that you caught me on a good day, I'm
      not nearly so gentlemanly IRL! (or on the list most of the time, come to
      think of it...)

      >Your knowledge of these things is astounding.
      [shakes head vigorously]
      You're kind, but I have some advantages - like living here with a Czech wife
      I can ask questions of, and the fact that I both work in the heritage
      industry and translate a lot of historical and archaeological material, much
      (most) of which has not appeared previously in English. On the other hand,
      what little I know generally stops at the border as a result, and I'm not an
      SCA member... but you can't have everything!!!

      Do you get out to this part of the world often? I haven't visited the
      Wallachian Open-Air Museum in Roz'nov pod Radhos'tem - mainly because it's
      at the opposite end of the country and I have to rely on public transport -
      but (to crib from the back of a tourist map I translated a couple of years
      ago) it currently includes:

      ""
      The wooden township: a collection of vernacular buildings, documenting the
      lifestyle and standards of living of burgesses, bailiffs and craftsmen.
      The mill dale: an area of technical water-powered structures, including a
      mill, a fulling mill, a water-powered sawmill, an oil plant and a water
      hammer.
      The Wallachian village: a collection of residential and other buildings,
      characterising the lifestyle, economy, employment and homes of the
      inhabitants of a Wallachian village.
      ""

      FWIW the Czech word for "open-air muzeum" is <skanzen>!


      >It is interesting that the Vlachs are a subject of recurrent debate...
      >but like you I find these little pockets of ethnicity fascinating.

      There is, unfortunately, debate about whether they arrived during the
      occupation of the land by the Slavs or later (cf your Britannica quote),
      whether they came from Romania or elsewhere, and whether or not they are
      actually related to the Romanies... And of course all questions of
      race/ethnicity are controversial here...

      I think your point about "vlach" coming to be applied to Italians is
      probably right - thinking of Alpine transhumance in particular.

      >Thank you for the information so patiently and generously
      >given and also for the websites to follow up.

      My pleasure - after all, the SIG exists so that people can "share what they
      know"...

      Cheers!

      Alastair

      ---------------------------
      Alastair Millar, BSc(Hons)
      Consultancy and translation for the heritage industry
      e-mail: alastair@..., http://www.skriptorium.cz
      P.O.Box 685, CZ 111 21 Prague 1, Czech Republic
    • Robert J Welenc
      Greetings, gentle cousins! I am looking for documentation for the Romanian form of Elizabeth and am not finding a whole lot of information on Romanian names.
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 3, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        Greetings, gentle cousins!

        I am looking for documentation for the Romanian form of 'Elizabeth'
        and am not finding a whole lot of information on Romanian names.

        The client believes it to be 'Elisabeta', which seems to be a logical
        form.

        Alanna
        ***********
        Saying of the day:
        Atheism is a non-prophet organization.
      • bmccoy@chapelperilous.net
        ... I ve seen both Elisabeta and Elisaveta used in reference to Sucevita Monastery in Romania (near Punta, at the edge of the Carpathinas) and a 16th
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 3, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          On Fri, 3 Nov 2000, Robert J Welenc wrote:

          > I am looking for documentation for the Romanian form of 'Elizabeth'
          > and am not finding a whole lot of information on Romanian names.
          >
          > The client believes it to be 'Elisabeta', which seems to be a logical
          > form.

          I've seen both 'Elisabeta' and 'Elisaveta' used in reference to Sucevita
          Monastery in Romania (near Punta, at the edge of the Carpathinas) and a
          16th century woman of that name to whom the monastery was dedicated to --
          she apparently murdered her husband so her two sones could inherit the
          throne.

          Check out this:

          http://www.rotravel.com/romania/monasteries/sucev.htm

          That should get you started.

          Istvan
          http://www.chapelperilous.net
          ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Life is a hospital in which every patient is possessed by the desire to
          change his bed.
          -- Charles Baudelaire
        • vespirus@socrates.berkeley.edu
          The series of Teach Yourself Books now has a volume called Beginner s Russian Script , which teaches the basics of reading Cyrillic (printed and
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 24, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            The series of "Teach Yourself Books" now has a volume called "Beginner's
            Russian Script", which teaches the basics of reading Cyrillic (printed and
            handwritten) one step at a time. I've always had trouble with Cyrillic,
            and the book has helped me already, even though I've only had it a few
            days. I'd recommend it for anyone wanting to learn a language (such as
            Russian) that uses Cyrillic, or for anyone wanting to teach a class on the
            subject. It's in paperback, and costs only $12.95. (ISBN 0-658-00950-8)

            --Walraven
          • Britta Parsons
            The Teach Yourself series is pretty good; anyone know if there is an equivalent for learning Old Church Slavonic? Vasilisa Myshkina
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 24, 2000
            • 0 Attachment
              The "Teach Yourself" series is pretty good; anyone know if there is an
              equivalent for learning Old Church Slavonic?

              Vasilisa Myshkina
              ________________________________________________________________
              GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
              Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
              Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit:
              http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.
            • MHoll@aol.com
              In a message dated 11/24/2000 9:35:08 PM Central Standard Time, ... No, I think they re only for modern languages. Predslava.
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 24, 2000
              • 0 Attachment
                In a message dated 11/24/2000 9:35:08 PM Central Standard Time,
                vasalisa@... writes:

                > The "Teach Yourself" series is pretty good; anyone know if there is an
                > equivalent for learning Old Church Slavonic?

                No, I think they're only for modern languages.

                Predslava.
              • timbo@marcon.org
                A friend sent me this. HOT GAME OF THE DAY European Wars: Cossacks Go to war in 16th century Europe http://cgi.zdnet.com/slink?62734:1743488
                Message 7 of 13 , Nov 25, 2000
                • 0 Attachment
                  A friend sent me this.

                  HOT GAME OF THE DAY
                  European Wars: Cossacks
                  Go to war in 16th century Europe
                  http://cgi.zdnet.com/slink?62734:1743488
                • V. J. Boitchenko
                  I know there is a Church Slavonic E-Tutor web site at http://www.orthodoxepubsoc.org/ I do not know if it is any good since I speak Russian and have a good
                  Message 8 of 13 , Nov 26, 2000
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I know there is a Church Slavonic E-Tutor web site at
                     
                     
                    I do not know if it is any good since I speak Russian and have a good command of Church Slavonic and the Tutor starts from the very basics, and as far as I understand, it is targeted to English speaking audience. I heard that it is rather good though.
                     
                    There are also various resources on the internet where you can download fonts for Church Slavonic and Slavonic style English fonts.
                     
                    yours,
                     
                    v
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Friday, November 24, 2000 10:30 PM
                    Subject: Re: [sig] Russian Script

                    The "Teach Yourself" series is pretty good; anyone know if there is an
                    equivalent for learning Old Church Slavonic?

                    Vasilisa Myshkina
                    ________________________________________________________________
                    GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
                    Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
                    Join Juno today!  For your FREE software, visit:
                    http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.

                  • V. J. Boitchenko
                    Dmitriy! To the best of my knowledge the Old Russian has never been codified. Besides that, there would be different stages in the development of the Old
                    Message 9 of 13 , Nov 26, 2000
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Dmitriy!
                       
                      To the best of my knowledge the Old Russian has never been codified. Besides that, there would be different stages in the development of the Old Russian and it would be very difficult to do.
                       
                      As to Church Slavonic, there are all kinds of synodal editions and their translations into English. I can only suggest that you browse the web or if you are on the East Coast by any chance you can check at any of the three Russian seminaries whichever one is closest to you. Many church websites will provide various links for book stores as well.
                       
                      I would never recommend anyone with no knowledge of Russian or any other Slavic language to try more than reading rules.
                       
                      Best wishes,
                       
                      v
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Sunday, November 26, 2000 7:08 PM
                      Subject: Re: [sig] Russian Script

                      I looked at the site http://www.orthodoxepubsoc.org/ and the descrption says
                      that it only teaches how to pronounce prayers and such, but does not teach
                      vocabularly or grammar.  Probably useful for american orthodox, but not for
                      us..
                      Do you know by any chance a good church slavonic tutorial or textbook in
                      (modern) Russian?  Russian is my native language, print or internet is
                      equally good.  I found this: http://chslav.hypermart.net/ while writing the
                      e-mail, has anyone used the stuff there?

                      Same question, but for Old Russian (Drevnerusskiy)?

                      -Dmitriy
                         Shelomianin(SCA)
                         Ryaboy (Mundanely)



                      _____________________________________________________________________________________
                      Get more from the Web.  FREE MSN Explorer download : http://explorer.msn.com


                    • Dmitriy V. Ryaboy
                      I looked at the site http://www.orthodoxepubsoc.org/ and the descrption says that it only teaches how to pronounce prayers and such, but does not teach
                      Message 10 of 13 , Nov 26, 2000
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I looked at the site http://www.orthodoxepubsoc.org/ and the descrption says
                        that it only teaches how to pronounce prayers and such, but does not teach
                        vocabularly or grammar. Probably useful for american orthodox, but not for
                        us..
                        Do you know by any chance a good church slavonic tutorial or textbook in
                        (modern) Russian? Russian is my native language, print or internet is
                        equally good. I found this: http://chslav.hypermart.net/ while writing the
                        e-mail, has anyone used the stuff there?

                        Same question, but for Old Russian (Drevnerusskiy)?

                        -Dmitriy
                        Shelomianin(SCA)
                        Ryaboy (Mundanely)



                        _____________________________________________________________________________________
                        Get more from the Web. FREE MSN Explorer download : http://explorer.msn.com
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.