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theses of interest? REALLY BLOODY LONG

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  • Jeff Heilveil
    Salut! I was looking for some random time killing information and found the following which may or may not be of any use to you... cu drag, Bogdan ...
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 20, 2000
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      Salut!

      I was looking for some random time killing information and found the
      following which may or may not be of any use to you...

      cu drag,
      Bogdan

      ---------- Forwarded message ----------

      <1>
      Accession Number
      ADG9938545
      Author
      Sulewski, Robert Michael.
      Title
      "HISTORYJA O CHWALEBNYM ZMARTWYCHWSTANIU PANSKIM" BY MIKOLAJ Z WILKOWIECKA:
      AN ANNOTATION, CONTEXTUALIZATION, AND TRANSLATION (POLAND, DRAMA, SIXTEENTH
      CENTURY, RESURRECTION PLAYS).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. 1999. 630p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: ADG9938545.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 60-07, Section: A, page: 2519.
      Abstract
      The late sixteenth-century <italic>Historyja o chwalebnym Zmartwychwstaniu
      Pańskim</italic> (<italic>The History of the Glorious Resurrection of
      the Lord</italic>) by MikoLaj z Wilkowiecka is the earliest surviving
      Resurrection play in Polish, and the first Polish play to contain stage
      directions.

      Previous scholarly work on the play has been primarily concerned with
      authorship, and textual history, and dramatic sources. This dissertation
      consists of several original analyses. The first is a philological study,
      including a commentary on and annotation of the play that establishes
      Biblical, patristic, and other theological sources for the text, and the
      method of their incorporation.

      There are three thematic discussions that examine the place of the play in
      literary history and analyze its historical and theological context. I argue
      that the playwright asserts his Catholicism not by overt polemics against
      contemporary Polish Protestantism, but more subtly by narrative similarities
      to earlier plays of the genre, and by allusions to Catholic ritual and dogma.

      The playwright also intends to show us something of his sixteenth-century
      world (apart from religious aspects), as manifested in characterizations and
      historical anachronisms. While some manifestations of
      “worldliness” are consistent with the he theology of the play,
      some are not. I examine all these manifestations, and the ways the
      playwright attempts to recuperate his theology where these manifestations
      jeopardize it.

      I employ a more theoretical approach in my examination of the humor of the
      play, based in part on Mikhail Bakhtin's analysis of carnival. While the
      humor of the play retains elements of medieval genres, it
      also anticipates seventeenth-century satire. Finally, I argue that the
      playwright utilizes humor as a mnemonic device for the purposes of
      prosetylization.

      This dissertation also contains the first complete staging history of the
      play in Poland from the sixteenth to the twentieth century, including
      productions by Leon Schiller, Kazimierz Dejmek, Mieczyslaw Kotlarczyk, and
      Piotr Cieplak. Finally, I discuss my own production of my translation of the
      play in Ann Arbor, Michigan in 1998.

      My English translation of the <italic>Historyja</italic> is also included.
      It is the first to my knowledge.


      <2>
      Accession Number
      ADG9943043
      Author
      Bennett, Brian P.
      Title
      DIVINING HISTORY: PROVIDENTIAL INTERPRETATION IN THE "PRIMARY CHRONICLE" OF
      KIEVAN RUS' (KIEVAN RUS' , RUSSIA, UKRAINE, BELARUS).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. 1999. 262p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: ADG9943043.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 60-08, Section: A, page: 2955.
      Abstract
      This dissertation is a study of the <italic>Primary Chronicle</italic> of
      Kievan Rus’. Kievan Rus’ (ca. 850–1250 CE) was the first
      state of the East Slavs, the rootstock of today's Russia, Ukraine, and
      Belarus. In 988 CE Byzantine Christianity was officially introduced there.
      The document <italic> par excellence</italic> from this period is the
      <italic>Primary Chronicle </italic>, or, as it is more accurately known, the
      <italic>Tale of Bygone Years</italic> (<italic>Povest’ vremennykh
      let</italic>). The text both records and realizes the reception of Byzantine
      Christianity in Rus’. It was written and redacted in different stages
      at the Caves Monastery near Kiev. After an introductory section of legendary
      tales concerning the origins of Rus’, it includes a year-by-year record
      of military, political, and ecclesiastical affairs from 852 to 1117. This
      annalistic account is enriched by a variety of materials, including folkloric
      tales, copies of diplomatic treaties, sermons, a synopsis of salvation
      history, and excerpts from Byzantine world chronicles.

      It is often said that the <italic>Povest’ vremennykh let</italic>
      embraces a providential philosophy of history—providentialism.
      However, there is little scholarly agreement regarding what this
      providentialism entails, or how it is articulated in the text. My argument
      involves three interconnected claims. First, I suggest that providentialism
      in the <italic>Povest’ vremennykh let</italic> involves two distinct
      aspects: one has to do with what may be called world-construction, the other
      with world-maintenance. In the world-construction mode, the chroniclers
      establish an identity for Rus’ by locating it in the grand narrative of
      salvation history. In the world-maintenance mode, the chroniclers use
      traditional providential materials to explain things that threaten the
      Christian nation of Rus’. These threats include anomalies occurring in
      nature, warfare, and pagan “magic.” Second, I contend that this
      world-maintenance aspect of providentialism constitutes a coherent discourse
      (i.e., an ensemble of stories, statements, etc.) in the text. The bulk of
      the dissertation is a detailed study of this discourse. Third, I claim that
      there is a family resemblance between this aspect of providentialism and
      divination. Both discourses use special methods to reveal the hidden
      significance of problematic events. I introduce comparative divinatory
      materials to help bring out this resemblance.


      <3>
      Accession Number
      ADGNQ39572
      Author
      Nazarenko, Tatiana.
      Title
      CONTEMPORARY VISUAL POETRY IN RUSSIAN AND UKRAINIAN: A CRITICAL STUDY
      (POETRY).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA (CANADA). 1999. 344p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: ADGNQ39572.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 60-08, Section: A, page: 2955.
      Abstract
      The present dissertation conducts an interdisciplinary genre study of recent
      visual poetry in Russian and Ukrainian. Due to the fact that visual poetry
      in either language is being created not only in Eastern Europe but also in
      expatriate communities in Austria, Germany, France, Canada and the United
      States, published and unpublished visual texts are studied irrespective of
      their provenance. A limited number of poetic texts in English and French,
      and visual poems containing linguistic signs of more than one language (at
      least one of them being Ukrainian or Russian) are included for the
      comparative analysis. Therefore, the poetic codes conditioned by social
      factors and their validity in different contexts are considered for
      discussion of the broader issue of ethno-aesthetics. The question of
      cross-cultural influences is not avoided whenever these elucidate structural,
      semantic and semiotic features.

      In the absence of a comprehensive history of either Russian or Ukrainian
      visual writing, a synoptic overview of the most remarkable achievements of
      both traditions is provided in the first chapter. This facilitates the
      comprehension of visual poetry in Russian and Ukrainian being composed today;
      and both are analyzed in the second and third chapters respectively. In the
      process of analysis of visual poetry (which typically utilizes the dial sign)
      the two sets of signifiers and signifieds (one verbal, the other visual)
      receive close examination. The question of reader's response to verbally
      minimal texts, organized according to a series of formal conventions, is
      applied in the light of the reception theory. In the course of the
      structural analysis, various visual and linguistic techniques are closely
      examined and wherever possible compared to the means of pictorial and
      linguistic resourcefulness utilized by medieval,
      early-modern and futurist authors. The poetic practice of various schools
      and individual practitioners is analyzed in depth in the context of the
      history and aesthetics of the genre. Some aspects of the semiotics and
      perception of visual poetry (including nondiscursive visual texts) are
      addressed specifically in the fourth chapter. The appendix includes works of
      Russian and Ukrainian authors.
      ISBN
      0-612-39572-3


      <4>
      Accession Number
      ADG9931420
      Author
      Taylor, Pegatha Jean.
      Title
      SAINT BERNARD OF CLAIRVAUX AND THE WEST SLAVIC CRUSADE: THE
      FORMATION OF MISSIONARY AND CRUSADER IDEALS ON THE
      GERMAN-SLAVIC BORDER (POPE EUGENIUS III).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY. 1999. 370p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: ADG9931420.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 60-06, Section: A, page: 2172.
      Abstract
      This project analyzes the first attempt in the Middle Ages to conduct a
      crusade for the purposes of converting the enemy. In 1147 an army of
      soldiers from Central and Northern Europe invaded an area roughly
      corresponding to the current German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommem. Several
      politically autonomous and pagan Slavic tribes inhabited
      this region. The crusaders had obtained the support of two Cisterican monks
      who spear-headed the Second Crusade (1146–48), Bernard of Clairvaux and
      Pope Eugenius III: the participants were allowed to fulfill their crusader
      vow and gain the remission of their sins by attacking and converting Slavs
      rather than fighting in the Holy Land. My research explains why this
      missionary crusade—the first of its kind—came into being where
      and when it did. I address a theoretical issue of interest to a broad range
      of historians: the use of the ideal of religious conversion as a source of
      ethical justification for conducting war.

      I argue that in the eleventh century, ecclesiastics who had trained in the
      missionary archdiocese of Magdeburg were prone to associating martyrdom and
      the physical coercion of converts as two related categories of violence
      (Chapter 11). Prior to the birth of the crusader movement, the missionary
      tradition in this region was already militant. Chapters III and IV describe
      the reasons why Bernard of Clairvaux supported this campaign. I argue that
      the West Slavs provided Bernard with an end-point to his increasingly
      eschatological definition of the Second Crusade. In anticipation of the
      ultimate union of all souls at the end of time, Bernard counseled the
      crusaders to establish Christian rule over the remaining unconverted Gentiles
      in the world. Pope Eugenius transformed this vision into an applied
      programme to help reform and extend the Church, in part by recruiting
      ecclesiastics to participate in the West Slavic Crusade as
      missionaries (Chapter V). They interpreted the pope's offer to remit their
      sins as an opportunity to realize the ideals of a religious order which
      followed a mixed life—active and contemplative—on the model of
      the apostles (Chapter VI).


      <5>
      Accession Number
      ADGNQ35178
      Author
      Harttrup, Philip John Vincent.
      Title
      NIKOLAI GOGOL AND THE MEDIEVAL ORTHODOX
      SLAVIC WORLD-VIEW (RUSSIA, NINETEENTH CENTURY).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO (CANADA). 1998. 254p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: ADGNQ35178.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 60-01, Section: A, page: 0152.
      Abstract
      This thesis examines Nikolai Gogol's creative and publicistic writings in the
      context of the medieval Orthodox Slavic
      literary and cultural tradition. Though Gogol wrote his entire corpus during
      the Romantic period and clearly shared a great deal with the Romantics in
      both Russia and the West, his thought and writings reveal his strong affinity
      for the heritage of Kievan Rus' and Muscovite Russia. The particular aspects
      of the pre-Petrine tradition most prevalent in Gogol's work include the
      following: the notion of the writer's role as divinely inspired, the monastic
      vocation, eschatological thought, aesthetic values, the influence of the
      demonic, and the ethical matrix of the culture.

      While it was once believed that Gogol had undergone a religious crisis, a
      close examination of his correspondence and creative output shows that his
      religious and moral views remained relatively constant throughout his life.
      Indeed, what he says in his early works reappears, only more overtly, in his
      final book, <italic>Selected Passages From Correspondence With
      Friends</italic>. As Gogol adapted and assimilated various aspects of the
      medieval tradition throughout his writings, <italic>Selected
      Passages</italic> may be viewed as the ultimate and most explicit testimony
      to his medieval world-view.
      ISBN
      0-612-35178-5
      Language
      Russian.


      <6>
      Accession Number
      ADG9902386
      Author
      Curta, Florin.
      Title
      MAKING AN EARLY MEDIEVAL ETHNIE: THE CASE OF THE EARLY SLAVS
      (SIXTH TO SEVENTH CENTURY A.D.) (SIXTH CENTURY).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY. 1998. 1136p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: ADG9902386.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 59-08, Section: A, page: 3151.
      Abstract
      This study approaches the problem of the early Slavs from the perspective of
      current anthropological theories on ethnicity. The relationship between
      material culture and ethnicity is also examined, with particular emphasis on
      the notion of style. The historiography of the subject is vast and its
      survey shows why and how a particular approach to the history of the early
      Slavs was favored by linguistically minded historians and archaeologists.
      The historiography of the early Slavs is also the story of how academic
      discourse was used for the construction of national identity.

      The study of the written sources indicates that the history of the Sclavenes
      and the Antes only begins with the early 500s. The archaeological evidence
      shows that the implementation of the sixth-century Danube limes under Emperor
      Justinian played a much more important role in the changes eventually leading
      to the withdrawal of the Roman armies in the early 600s than did
      Slavic raids. The same is true for sixth- and
      seventh-century hoards of Roman coins in Eastern Europe, which were often
      used to map the migration of the Slavs. A high rate of non-retrieval can be
      better explained in terms of inflation.

      On the other hand, the archaeological evidence from sites north of the Danube
      river suggests that specific artifacts, such as bow fibulae, may have been
      used for the construction of group identity. Assemblages found in the region
      where sixth- and seventh-century sources locate the Sclavenes and the Antes
      also indicate the rise of elites, which may have been responsible both for
      building ethnic boundaries and for the increase of Slavic
      raids in the last quarter of the sixth century. Many chiefs were mentioned
      in written sources, some of whom were called 'kings'. Because of these
      military and political developments Byzantine authors acknowledged the
      existence of groups to which they applied the names 'Sclavenes' and 'Antes'.
      Since no group called itself by either name, it is possible that a
      'Slavic' ethnicity was invented by Byzantine authors, in
      order to make sense of the process of group identification which was taking
      place north of the Danube frontier.


      <7>
      Accession Number
      ADG9840394
      Author
      Goldberg, ERIC Joseph.
      Title
      CREATING A MEDIEVAL KINGDOM: CAROLINGIAN KINGSHIP, COURT
      CULTURE, AND ARISTOCRATIC SOCIETY UNDER LOUIS OF EAST FRANCIA (840-876).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA. 1998. 415p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: ADG9840394.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 59-07, Section: A, page: 2666.
      Abstract
      "Creating a Medieval Kingdom: Carolingian Kingship, Court
      Culture, and Aristocratic Society under Louis of East Francia (840-76)" asks
      how medieval rulers built and maintained kingdom and empires
      in a period with few centralized governmental institutions or unifying
      national identities. To answer that question, this study focuses on the
      court of Louis of East Francia, Charlemagne's grandson who first united the
      Germanic and Slavic territories east of the Rhine into a
      coherent political entity: the East Frankish Kingdom. In exploring the
      nature and limitations of political order in the Middle Ages, this work
      focuses on three overlapping topics: (1) the great extent to which the king
      shared and exercised power with the territorial nobility through a politics
      of consensus and conflict; (2) the function of the royal court as the primary
      force of political, social, and cultural cohesion in the realm; and (3) the
      role of aristocratic and courtly political culture in expressing ideas about
      kingdoms, empires, and political hierarchy. To bring alive the elite world
      of the royal court, this study employs a decidedly interdisciplinary
      approach, turning to sources typically neglected by political historians such
      as the visual arts, archaeology, liturgical manuscripts, and vernacular
      literature.

      This study of how an medieval ruler built an enduring
      kingdom demonstrates the central role of court culture in creating political
      order in stateless societies. I argue that the medieval
      kingdom existed primarily within the face-to-face aristocratic society and
      elite cultural world of the royal palace. Kingdoms continually congealed and
      dissolved around the king's itinerant court as the nobles gathered for annual
      assemblies and military campaigns and then returned to their estates in the
      countryside. To a large extent, kingdoms did not exist outside the king's
      court: there aristocratic lordship reigned supreme.


      <8>
      Accession Number
      ADG9726554
      Author
      Kripkov, Yelaina S.
      Title
      THE BORROWED LYRE: VASILII ZHUKOVSKII AS ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF RUSSIAN ART
      OF POETIC TRANSLATION.
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS. 1996. 314p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: ADG9726554.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 58-03, Section: A, page: 0903.
      Abstract
      The dissertation considers V. I. Zhukovskii as one of the creators of
      Russian poetry of the "golden age," a founding father of Russian romanticism,
      and the greatest translator of his time.

      The dissertation formulates and addresses five tasks: (1) to elaborate the
      criteria for the evaluation of artistic translation; (2) to reconstruct
      Zhukovskii's "theoretical views" on translation; (3) to analyze his actual
      method and its historical evolution; (4) to reveal the roots and genealogy of
      Zhukovskii the translator on the basis of comparing it with practical and
      theoretical accomplishments of his Russian predecessors; (5) to show the
      intrinsic ties of Zhukovskii's achievements with romantic aesthetics. The
      basic method and core of the dissertation is a comparative analysis of
      original poetic texts (in English and German) and their poetic reconstruction
      by Zhukovskii (in Russian).

      Zhukovskii synthesized two previously dominant trends in poetic
      translation--"free adaptation to Russian tastes" and "literal conveyance."
      This synthesis became possible due to the romantic aesthetic which he
      creatively borrowed from Western European poets. Zhukovskii's translations
      acquainted the Russian reader with new achievements of Western European
      poetry and introduced romanticism as a new dominant trend in Russian
      literature. They also significantly enriched the Russian poetic language.

      Zhukovskii, the translator, was most successful in his renderings of six
      Western poets: Thomas Gray, Robert Southey, Walter Scott, George Gordon
      Byron, Fridrich Schiller, and Wolfgang Goethe. Dealing with Gray, Zhukovskii
      elaborated a Russian version of the European genre of funeral elegy. Southey
      and Scott provided examples for the development of the Russian romantic
      ballad. Byron's "Prisoner of Chillon" inspired Zhukovskii to create a
      Russian romantic lyrical epic poem. Schiller attracted his attention to
      medieval, chivalric and ancient imagery and themes, while
      Goethe suggested examples of new, pre-romantic lyrics.

      Zhukovskii participated (from 1800 till 1850) in the four successive periods
      in the evolution of the Russian literary process: neo-classicism,
      sentimentalism. romanticism, and realism. His translations bear the
      influence of all these literary movements. Zhukovskii employed all three
      approaches to the originals, available and acceptable to him: (1) "free
      adaptation;" (2) preservation of the stylistic system of the original, though
      allowing some deviations from it; and (3) "precise translation.".

      The first approach prevailed (although it did not exclude the others) in the
      early period of Zhukovskii's creativity (1802-15); the second--in the middle
      period (1815-33); and the third--in the last period (1833-49). Thus,
      Zhukovskii's translation palette cannot and should not be reduced to one
      particular method, strategy or principle.


      <9>
      Accession Number
      ADG9639030
      Author
      Smith, Marilyn Schwinn.
      Title
      THE BIRTH OF THE MODERN FEMALE BARD: GENDER AND GENRE IN MARINA TSVETAEVA'S
      "PEREKOP" (RUSSIA, POETRY, WOMEN WRITERS).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 1996. 420p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: ADG9639030.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 57-07, Section: A, page: 3010.
      Abstract
      The life and career of the remarkable Russian poet, Marina Tsvetaeva
      (1892-1941) offers a paradigm for the modern woman writer. Despite the great
      number of women associated with Western Modernism, the Modernist canon is
      striking for the paucity of its women representatives. This thesis hopes to
      redress that situation, starting with a new reading of Tsvetaeva's epic poem
      of the Russian Civil War, Perekop (1928-1929). Perekop is the culmination of
      Tsvetaeva's verse experimentation with her culture's received constructs of
      gender and genre and it is the work in which she realizes the voice of an
      anonymous female bard. The failure of this poem to attract critical
      recognition parallels the experience of comparably innovative work among
      Tsvetaeva's female contemporaries.

      Tsvetaeva's work, in verse and prose, is a de facto manifesto of a female
      poetics. Deciphering the terms of this female modernist poetics provides a
      critical discourse in which to appreciate the comparably innovative and
      de-valued work of other modernist women writers. My thesis first outlines
      the cultural obstacles to Tsvetaeva's epic ambition, then explicates the
      strategies by which she accomplishes it. Through her re-writing of the
      gender-linked metaphors of Western poetics, Tsvetaeva creates the modern
      female bard.

      The trajectory of my analysis is determined by the unifying system of lyric
      tropes I extract from both prose and verse. This series of tropes is then
      located in Tsvetaeva's appropriation of western ideas, ranging from the
      practice of Homer, Herodotus, Hesiod and Heraclitus through the theories of
      the German Romantics and Nietzsche to the practice of the Russian poets
      Aleksandr Pushkin and Boris Pasternak. My analysis culminates in the
      exploration of the medieval Russian text Slovo o polku
      Igoreve as the unifying sub-text of Tsvetaeva's Perekop.


      <10>
      Accession Number
      AAI9533554
      Author
      Foster, Paul Milan, Jr.
      Title
      THE CHURCH SLAVONIC TRANSLATION OF MACCABEES IN THE GENNADIJ BIBLE (1499)
      (GENNADIJ GONZOV, RUSSIAN).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. 1995. 419p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI9533554.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 56-06, Section: A, page: 2262.
      Abstract
      The Maccabean Books in the Gennadij Bible were translated from Latin into
      Church Slavonic at the end of the fifteenth century by Russian scribes
      working in the scriptorium set up by Archbishop Gennadij Gonzov. The members
      of the Gennadij circle were influenced by Old Church Slavonic texts collected
      in Novgorod, which also influenced Gennadij's choice of Biblical books. The
      language of the translation is Church Slavonic with a noticeable influence
      from the Russian vernacular, particularly the Novgorodian dialect. The
      thesis that the Maccabean books were translated by a Croatian Glagoljas, a
      native speaker of cakavian dialect of Croatian is not supported by the
      linguistic analysis of the text. The Croatian translator theory first arose
      at the end of the nineteenth century, but only with A. I. Sobolevskij's
      examination of this question did the supposition gain linguistic credibility.
      This dissertation argues that certain linguistic features attributed in past
      scholarship on this question to a speaker of Serbian or Croatian, are instead
      (1) archaisms--genetically South Slavic (Church Slavonic),
      but by the end of the fifteenth century, functionally East
      Slavic (Russian); (2) Russian dialectalisms, in the main,
      based on the North Russian dialects, or (3) innovations, motivated largely by
      the syntax and forms of the Latin original. The comparison of the phonology,
      orthography, morphology, and lexicon of the Maccabean books in the Gennadij
      Bible with a draft translation of the same work (Pogodin 84) reveals a
      conscious effort on the part of the editors of the Gennadij Bible to archaize
      the language of the Maccabean texts.


      <11>
      Accession Number
      AAI9526063
      Author
      Milich, Petar.
      Title
      CUMULATIVE SLAVICITY: CULTURAL INTERACTION AND LANGUAGE
      REPLACEMENT IN THE NORTH BALKANS DURING THE SLAVIC MIGRATION
      PERIOD, A.D. 500-900 (SIXTH CENTURY, TENTH CENTURY).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. 1995. 276p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI9526063.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 56-04, Section: A, page: 1485.
      Abstract
      The focus of this study is culture contact and culture change in the north
      Balkans from the sixth through the tenth centuries. Previous scholarship
      held that the Slavic migration period (the sixth and seventh
      centuries AD) witnessed the wholesale extirpation and displacement of
      autochthonous populations by warrior Slavs who migrated from a racially and
      linguistically homogeneous homeland. Having displaced the indigenous
      populations in the Balkans, the Slavs subsequently effected a land-taking
      (Landnahme). Scholars have also argued that the Slavic
      migration period was characterized by demographic decline. They viewed
      cultural interaction between Slavs and autochthonous populations of the
      Byzantine Empire as ephemeral and inconsequential. According to this view,
      Byzantine culture did not make serious inroads among the Slavs of Bulgaria,
      Macedonia, and Serbia until the ninth century when many
      Slavic archontes formally adopted Orthodox Christianity. A
      new methodological framework that goes beyond the aforementioned assumptions
      is needed. Future studies should focus on the phenomenon of in situ language
      replacement and cultural diffusion in which change occurs without
      long-distance migration.

      This study argues that the Slavic migration period was one
      of exponential demographic growth and largely peaceful cultural interaction.
      Only marginal displacements occurred through forced population displacement.
      The Slavicization of the north Balkans was the product of
      cultural and linguistic convergence and acculturation. Immigrant farmers
      played a vital role in this process by introducing a new subsistence
      technology and metallurgy.

      In situ language replacement can assume numerous guises. The
      demography-subsistence model was recently elaborated by C. Renfrew. It is
      an important heuristic device that helps to shed new light on the mechanics
      of Slavicization. The demography-subsistence model posits
      short-distance migration by agriculturalists who introduced a new subsistence
      technology. Their migration was random in direction, and it did not
      originate from some notional homeland. Although the immigrants possessed
      little social ranking, the technology they introduced fostered exponential
      population growth until a saturation level was reached. These conditions
      were present in the north Balkans during the sixth and seventh centuries.

      During the Slavic migration period north Balkan settlements
      underwent a shift from cattle ranching to cereal cultivation. This shift has
      left traces in the archaeological record in the form of new agricultural
      implements. Archaeologists, for example, have documented a sharp rise in the
      number of sickles and scythes recovered from Carpathian Arc and Danubian
      plain settlements. The rise in sickles corresponds to a decline in the
      number of cattle ranching tools used in Late Antiquity. The presence of
      these tools, as well as new forms of material culture previously ascribed by
      many scholars to the Slavs was diffused through demography-subsistence. Thus
      in demographic terms the Balkans, during the period under discussion, was
      characterized by substantial continuity. However, in terms of language and
      of material culture, the Balkans was characterized by profound
      transformation.


      <12>
      Accession Number
      AAI9514367
      Author
      Alexander, Eugene M.
      Title
      EARLY SLAVIC INVASIONS AND SETTLEMENTS IN THE AREA OF THE
      LOWER DANUBE IN THE SIXTH THROUGH THE EIGHTH CENTURIES (BALKANS).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--NEW YORK UNIVERSITY. 1994. 259p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI9514367.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 56-01, Section: A, page: 0315.
      Abstract
      During the early sixth century the South Slavs emerged as a serious threat to
      Byzantium for control of the middle and lower Danube, while in the late sixth
      and seventh centuries they became a threat to most of the Balkan territory of
      the Empire.

      This work attempts to examine the prevailing scholarship on the South
      Slavic invasions along the lower Danube and the long term
      contacts between the Slavs and their neighbors including Bulgars, Avars and
      the local Romanized population. While the literary sources provide a slim
      narrative essentially of political and military events, archaeology gives
      opportunities to assess many major transitions and continuities within the
      period.

      It has been generally accepted that the sixth-seventh century
      Slavic invasions were wholly destructive. Despite the
      temporary arrangements between Justinian and the Antae in the mid-sixth
      century, the Slavs in general, unlike the Goths, occupied imperial provinces
      not as foederati, seeking a legitimate and subordinate place within the
      empire, but as invaders striving for conquest. The destruction brought by
      the Slavs, Bulgars and Avars in the Northern Balkans was extensive and
      thorough. After Heraclius' (610-641) reign most of the cities were sacked,
      the area of the countryside was repeatedly laid waste. The inhabitants, when
      they escaped slaughter, either fled or were enslaved. The survival of cities
      such as Tomi, Istria, Odessos, Marcianople, Dorustorum suggest that the
      occupation of the land was slow and gradual process, which was completed by
      the Proto-Bulgars of Asparuch in 680. After this the Byzantine imperial
      system north of Haemus totally collapsed.

      However, the ethnographic situation brought by these developments is a
      subject of vigorous debate. Part of it is due to the lack of evidence. The
      Slavic infiltration and settlement in the area south of the
      Danube was an immigration of small clan or tribe organized
      Slavic communities coming from the area of Vallachia and
      Moldavia. Yet archaeological evidence indicates that these invasions proved
      to be the most destructive for the Empire. The randomly repeated raids
      gradually devastated and vacated most of Moesia and Scythia. Even some of
      the strongest supporters of the continuity theory in both Bulgaria and
      Romania admit that archaeological, linguistic, and toponimical evidence
      suggest that for the seventh-eight century this area was entirely Slavonized.
      Yet the Sklaviniae were loose tribal associations, lacking any clearly
      defined political structure over which Byzantium could still maintain
      sovereignty. This situation principally changed with the arrival of the
      Bulgars of Asparuch and the incorporation of the South Slavs from Moesia,
      Scythia and Vallachia into the newly established First Bulgarian State.


      <13>
      Accession Number
      AAI9427343
      Author
      Collins, Daniel Enright.
      Title
      THE PRAGMATICS OF REPORTED SPEECH IN MEDIEVAL RUSSIAN TRIAL
      TRANSCRIPTS: THE CONTEXTUALIZATION AND INTERPRETATION OF METAPRAGMATIC
      FRAMING STRATEGIES IN OLD RUSSIAN JURIDICAL LANGUAGE, 1400-1505.
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES. 1994. 656p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI9427343.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 55-05, Section: A, page: 1275.
      Abstract
      A pragmatic investigation of the function and distribution of different
      formal varieties of reported speech (metapragmatic framing strategies) in
      fifteenth- and early-sixteenth-century Russian trial transcripts, the study
      explores how the conditions of contextualization reflected collectively and
      individually purposive use of speech-reporting strategies. It establishes
      observable distributional norms in specific recurring contexts that had known
      or inferable functions, then undertakes to identify pragmatic factors that
      could have justified these conventional preferences as the most effective
      means of accomplishing the writers' socially institutionalized communicative
      goals. Where there are departures from the observable conventions for a
      given context, the study attempts to discover whether the represented speech
      event had any atypical features that could have motivated the writers to
      choose the unconventional techniques as a way of promoting optimal
      communication (maximally efficient interpretation for the given context).
      Most previous studies treat Old Russian reported speech only as an inventory
      of decontextualized compound syntactic constructions, which are typically
      presented as though they were semantically and functionally equivalent to one
      another. This purely taxonomic approach sheds little light on why individual
      reporting strategies should be favored in particular contexts. Thus the
      process of framing reported speech is better analyzed as a series of choices,
      each of which is an intentional action. The investigated text kind of trial
      transcripts represents a homogeneous and stable category of
      legal-administrative writing that is a privileged environment for the
      occurrence of reported speech. Trial transcripts typically consist of
      several coherent sections reflecting different stages of the judicial
      process; hence they contain several distinct contexts that could have
      different real-world functions and communicative goals. Although trial
      transcripts have a utilitarian character, their organization and wording can
      be shown to reflect their writers' purposive and even artful use of
      speech-reporting strategies as the principal devices in the discourse. Thus
      the study will reveal the close relationship between ordinary and literary
      language and testify to the conversational basis of certain compositional
      techniques traditionally regarded as the property of verbal art alone.


      <14>
      Accession Number
      AAI9421390
      Author
      Popovich, Thomas S.
      Title
      JEREMIJA THE PRESBYTER AND HIS ROLE IN MEDIEVAL
      SLAVIC LITERATURE.
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. 1994. 324p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI9421390.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 55-03, Section: A, page: 0690.
      Abstract
      This thesis analyzes the basic historical, cultural, literary, and linguistic
      questions concerning the reality of the existence of Presbyter Jeremija, in
      Slavic known as x xxxx epexxx,--a "priest of Bulgaria" at
      the turn of tenth century, his personal identity, the religious texts
      ascribed to him, and their place in Medieval
      Slavic literature. Traditionally dealt with as one of the
      most influential Bogomil religious writer of Slavic legends
      and apocryphal traditions, Pop Jeremya, his life, work and personality have
      not been sufficiently investigated by modern historiography who often
      confuses him with other heretical leaders of the same period.

      My research of Presbyter Jeremija is based on two sets of primary sources: on
      the historical evidence on him, his life and work, produced by the officials
      of the Orthodox Church; and on the still existing non-canonical apocryphal
      religious texts ascribed to him: "The Story of the Cross-tree" and "The
      Prayer against Fever," two genuine Bogomil texts providing a clear
      understanding of the basic tenets of the Bogomil heretical movement of the
      tenth-eleventh centuries. The authenticity of Jeremija's authorship of these
      texts was tested by a thematic analysis of the extant variants of the two
      apocrypha. The reconstructed base form of Jeremija's apocrypha was compared
      with related legends in non-Slavic languages in order to
      ascertain the extent to which Jeremija was an independent writer.

      Our analysis has shown that Jeremija the Presbyter was a historical
      personality of Medieval Slavic world, by
      the end of the tenth century a charismatic leader of an Eastern South
      Slavic religious province and a prolific translator of the
      Byzantine Greek apocryphal literature into Church Slavonic. By the end of
      the tenth century he very probably was an orthodox priest and an eclectic
      popular thinker whom we credit for the formulation of a moderate dualistic
      heretical teaching. During the period of his activity he was known as "the
      priest of Bulgaria", as his name is recorded in contemporary chronicles.

      The most probable place of Jeremija the Presbyter's activity during a later
      period of his life, very probably after the beginning of the eleventh
      century, characterized by a much stronger emphasis on Bogomil heretical
      teaching, must have been Medieval Bosnia in the Western part
      of the South Slavic linguistic area, where at the time the
      Bogomil movement began growing by putting out roots in the vernacular
      tradition. In our thesis, this proposition is corroborated by linguistic
      evidence in Jeremija the Presbvter's apocrypha, the "Story of the Crosstree"
      and the "Prayer against Fever", whose preserved texts exhibit a number of
      early Western South Slavic dialectical features.


      <15>
      Accession Number
      AAI9407003
      Author
      Oller, Thomas Hilary.
      Title
      THE NIKOL'SKIJ APOCALYPSE CODEX AND ITS PLACE IN THE TEXTUAL HISTORY OF
      MEDIEVAL SLAVIC APOCALYPSE MANUSCRIPTS
      (RUSSIA, MANUSCRIPTS).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--BROWN UNIVERSITY. 1993. 750p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI9407003.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 54-10, Section: A, page: 3771.
      Abstract
      The subject of this dissertation is the Nikol'skij Apocalypse Codex, a
      13th-century Russian Church Slavonic manuscript (MS 1 of the Nikol'skij
      Collection, Fond 32 in the Library of the Academy of Sciences, St.
      Petersburg, Russia). This codex is the oldest extant Slavic
      manuscript containing the text of the Apocalypse. Each Biblical verse is
      followed by explanatory commentary. The commentary translates that of
      Andreas, a 6th-century Greek Orthodox Archbishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia.

      Chapter I describes in detail the physical, linguistic, and paleographical
      characteristics of the Nikol'skij codex. It also confirms that six other
      extant Slavic manuscripts were copied by the same scribe,
      who can be identified as Timofej Ponomar', a sexton at St. James' Church in
      Novgorod in the mid-13th century. Chapter II contains a complete edition of
      the text of the manuscript (which has never before been published) in
      Cyrillic Church Slavonic script. Chapter III: Translation of the Text.
      Chapter IV: Notes on the Manuscript Text. Chapter V examines historical data
      concerning the place and date of the translation of the Apocalypse into
      Slavic, including the question of whether Methodius
      translated the Apocalypse. It discusses the Slavic
      churches' use of the Apocalypse and Slavic opinions as to
      its canonicity. The chapter then lists citations from the Apocalypse found
      in Old Church Slavonic texts and presents a descriptive catalogue of
      important medieval Slavic Apocalypse
      manuscripts. Chapter VI discusses linguistic data concerning when and where
      the Apocalypse was translated into Slavic, as well as the
      relationship of Nikol'skij to the original translation and to other early
      Apocalypse MSS. The Appendix discusses the origin and authorship of the
      Biblical Apocalypse, its canonicity, and its use by various churches. The
      Greek and Latin Churches receive most attention, with mention being made of
      the Syrian, Georgian, and other versions.


      <16>
      Accession Number
      AAI9304979
      Author
      Leckey, Celia Elizabeth.
      Title
      RELATIVE CLAUSES IN MEDIEVAL RUSSIAN TEXTS.
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY. 1992. 287p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI9304979.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 53-10, Section: A, page: 3511.
      Abstract
      In this thesis relative clauses in Russian texts from the sixteenth and
      seventeenth centuries are analyzed and the development of the Modern Russian
      relative clause is documented using Old Russian and Church
      Slavic texts. In particular, the development of a
      non-restrictive relative clause with kotoryj is shown to have occurred
      systematically. Intermediary stages in this process are identified using
      parameters of functional sentence perspective and text grammar.

      Two series of relative words appear in medieval Russian
      texts. Traditional theories base the distribution of these words on style
      and subject matter of the texts. In this study recent theories regarding the
      structure of relative clauses are used to identify two different relative
      structures. One series of relative words will be shown to correlate directly
      with one of the two structures (the correlative structure); the second series
      of relative words correlates directly with the other structure (the
      postnominal relative clause). The structures have different attributive,
      thematic and textual applications which are more or less useful depending on
      the genre of the text. The study concentrates on establishing a
      complementary distribution for the two structures based on these functions
      and relating this distribution to the rhetorical requirements of the
      different genres. The structure of the Modern Russian relative clause is
      shown to differ from both previous structures. Its development is related to
      the creation of new genres, and the spread of writing from official,
      institutionalized applications to private, individualized applications.

      Social changes, such as the need for increasing detail in legal documents,
      the application of the written mode in more and more spheres by the State,
      the expansion of literacy, and the spread of Western cultural models, will be
      proposed as the motivation for the emergence of new genres (and changes in
      older genres), which yielded changes in the system of relative clauses. The
      Modern Russian relative structure is a hierarchical syntactic structure, with
      a clearly superordinate member, and a clearly subordinate member, whereas in
      both of the two older structures these roles were less applicable. It is
      proposed that the development of these roles in the relative clause is one
      manifestation of a more general cultural development.


      <17>
      Accession Number
      AAI8717684
      Author
      Matejic, Predrag.
      Title
      MANUSCRIPT ATTRIBUTION THROUGH PAPER ANALYSIS: HILANDAR MONASTERY IN THE
      FOURTEENTH-CENTURY. (A CASE STUDY) (GREECE, SLAVIC,
      WATERMARKS).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. 1987. 327p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI8717684.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 48-05, Section: A, page: 1219.
      Abstract
      The dissertation presents a new approach to paper analysis for paleographic
      purposes. Rather than consider the dating of the paper (its typical use in
      paleography), paper is analyzed in an attempt to establish potential
      attribution to a scriptorium for manuscripts for which no information
      regarding the place of production is provided.

      Several hundred copies of watermarks of the Hilandar Monastery
      Slavic Manuscript Collection (Mt. Athos, Greece) datable to
      the fourteenth century were compared in an effort to determine existing
      interrelationships among the different types of paper utilized in codices
      copied completely or in part on paper. Based upon the relationships of the
      paper of certain manuscripts (interpreted through the watermarks), a total of
      19 (out of 114 unattributed fourteenth-century manuscripts) codices,
      presently housed in the library of Hilandar Monastery were suggested for
      attribution to the local scriptorium of Hilandar.

      This methodology also provided additional support for earlier attributions by
      other scholars who utilized traditional comparison of scribes' hands to
      suggest attribution.

      The new methodology is the only other means known to the author by which such
      manuscripts may be attributed. As such, it is a substantial departure from
      the typical use of paper analysis, and represents a contribution not only to
      Slavic, but to all medieval paleography.

      The dissertation presents the methodology, results, interpretations,
      suggested proofs of validity and a conclusion consisting of implications for
      paleography, the study of watermarks, and the study of Hilander Monastery.

      24 Tables, 39 Figures, 56 Plates and 9 Appendices are provided as
      illustrative or supporting material.


      <18>
      Accession Number
      AAI0558178
      Author
      Olster, David Michael.
      Title
      THE POLITICS OF USURPATION IN THE SEVENTH CENTURY: THE REIGN OF PHOCAS.
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. 1986.
      Document Delivery
      Not available from UMI.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 47-02, Section: A, page: 0627.
      Abstract
      The seventh century is rightfully considered as a turning point in the
      history of Byzantium. It is the century of the Arabic and
      Slavic invasions, and it marks the moment when the late
      Roman Mediterranean unity was shattered and the medieval
      Byzantine Empire emerged from the choas. An integral part of this political
      and social transformation is the disruption of the late Roman imperial
      continuity by the successive usurpations of the centurion Phocas and the
      exarch's son Heraclius. Since Constantine, no eastern emperor had fallen
      victim to internal revolt, but within a decade, two usurpers suddenly emerged
      to break the bonds of legitimacy.

      Historians have traditionally seen the first of these emperors, Phocas, as a
      villian, and his executioner, as the restorer of Byzantine fortunes. This
      interpretation of these reigns stems, however, from the writers of
      Heraclius's reign who used Phocas's "vices" to justify their patron's violent
      seizure of the throne.

      This dissertation seeks to re-evaluate the reign of the "evil" Phocas, and to
      demonstrate how, far from breaking the patterns of sixth century Byzantine
      political life, Phocas sought to maintain continuity both in his policies and
      propaganda.

      To this end, the dissertation first examines the source traditions for the
      reign of Phocas, and attempts to discount the biases of the Greek chronicle
      tradition that praised Heraclius at his predecessor's expense. The
      dissertation then re-works the chronology of the reign of Phocas,
      concentrating especially on his relationship with the Constantinopolitan
      aristocracy, the demes, the army and the course of the Persian War. Finally,
      the dissertation surveys the extant evidence from Phocas's reign that praises
      Phocas, and that illustrates how he utilized traditional imperial topol.
      Phocas desired not to appear as an usurper, but as a legitimate emperor in
      his own right, and indeed, the innovations he brought to the imperial office,
      such as the coronation in the church, lasted until the end of the Empire.

      Phocas's reign has been seen as a period of drastic and chaotic change, but
      this change can only be understood as arising out of the political, social
      and military development of the sixth century. Phocas was no deus ex machina
      of historical education, but was the culmination of a century of imperial
      devolution. The study of Phocas, therefore, is the study of the sixth
      century as well as the prolegomena to the seventh.


      <19>
      Accession Number
      AAI8515457
      Author
      Stuckert, Caroline Morris.
      Title
      THE HUMAN BIOLOGY OF BUDEC, CZECHOSLOVAKIA: A STUDY OF BIOCULTURAL
      ADAPTATION IN THE SLAVIC AND MEDIEVAL
      PERIODS (OSTEOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, SKELETONS).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA. 1985. 445p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI8515457.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 46-05, Section: A, page: 1336.
      Abstract
      This study concentrates on biocultural adaptation as reflected primarily at
      the site of Budec in Bohemia, and secondarily in the relationship of these
      samples to others from similar cultural and chronological contexts. The
      biocultural adaptation of these populations relative to each other and
      through time are incompletely understood, especially as they relate to
      morphological, demographic and pathological conditions influenced by
      physiological stress resulting from nutritional inadequacies, disease loads,
      or certain cultural practices.

      Data were collected from 72 individuals in the Budec cemetery
      (Slavic period) and a large collection of disarticulated
      bones repre- senting at least 89 individuals in the Budec ossuary
      (Medieval period). These data included age, sex, metric and
      nonmetric traits, stature, cranial and postcranial indices, dental pathology
      and vari- ants, and bone pathology. Similar data from the published
      literature were obtained for 8 contemporaneous Slavic period
      and 4 Medieval period sites in Bohemia. Quantitative and
      qualitative comparisons were made both spatially and temporally.

      Results indicate that the Budec cemetery and Ossuary samples fall well within
      the range of variation characteristic of Slavic and
      Medieval period samples in Bohemia. Demographic data
      suggest changes through time in patterns of childhood and female mortality,
      and lengthened lifespan. Morphological data indicate increased
      brachycephalization and decreased levels of platymeria, with little change in
      stature. Dental and pathological data give little evidence for severe
      nutritional deficits, but indicate fairly heavy infectious disease loads
      which most severely stress young adult females and children, especially in
      the immediate post-weaning period. Additional sources of disease stress
      introduced in the Medieval period include bubonic plague and
      syphilis. Differential activity levels by sex are indicated by rates of
      traumatic injury that are much greater for males than females.

      These results suggest that although the Medieval period
      witnessed the assault of new diseases, the reorganized social and economic
      structure increased resources and provided new buffering elements against a
      wide range of stress factors. In terms of a biocul- tural system, there may
      have been less negative environmental pressure, an increasingly successful
      adaptive response, or a synergistic interaction of these elements.


      <20>
      Accession Number
      AAI8427466
      Author
      Schulman, Mary.
      Title
      JUDAIC INFLUENCE AS REFLECTED IN IDEAS AND MOTIFS OF THE KIEVAN "PRIMARY
      CHRONICLE" (RUSSIA).
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. 1984. 259p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI8427466.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 45-10, Section: A, page: 3143.
      Abstract
      By Judaic influence we mean the religious and ethical philosophy of life
      inherent in the Judaic written and Oral Traditions. Its discussion in this
      paper, limited to a number of philosophical and literary themes of old
      Russian analistic texts for which parallels in old Biblical tradition were
      found, is intended to bring into focus the traces of such an influence in
      Medieval literary-historiographic texts of Old Rus'.

      The Kievan society was prepared to accept Judaic influence, but the
      complexities of the problem of such influence on a Christian society,
      stemming from the difficulty of differentiating between Judaic and Christian
      sources and between Judaic and human-universal motifs and ideas, necessitates
      the formation of criteria to obviate this difficulty.

      Documentary evidence of a thriving Jewish enclave in Old Rus' from the tenth
      century on refutes Benard D. Weinryb's denial of such enclaves prior to the
      fifteenth century. Documents point to Jewish exegetes and to Jewish students
      from Kiev studying in the West European (Rhenish, French, and Spanish)
      Talmudic Academies. Old Russian and Judaic sources attest to some contact
      between Jewish scholars and the upper clergy of Kiev, e.g., Feodosij's visit
      to the Zidovskija vorota. Additional contacts can be traced to Jewish
      merchants (raddanites), scholars, and messengers from the Babylonian and the
      western centers of Judaic learning.

      Five ideas (choseness, rejection, redemption, rewards and punishments, and
      kingship) and five motifs (vengeance, encroachment, hand of God, wisdom, and
      David and Goliath) were analyzed, ideas for which we found parallels in
      Judaic Biblical and post-Biblical literature, and in such Judaic historical
      works as the Josippon and the Judaic Wars.

      One of the questions that still remain is: What was the place and the role of
      the Judaic cultural component in the spiritual totality of Russian culture in
      the twelfth century? Some leading Jewish scholars (Nahum Slouschz, Isaac
      Berlin, Solomon Zinberg) have proposed some answers to this question. They
      are critically evaluated in our study. The final answer to the broader
      question, however, is still awaiting a full treatment.


      <21>
      Accession Number
      AAI8406464
      Author
      Bacic, Jakov.
      Title
      THE EMERGENCE OF THE SKLABENOI (SLAVS), THEIR ARRIVAL ON THE BALKAN
      PENINSULA, AND THE ROLE OF THE AVARS IN THESE EVENTS: REVISED CONCEPTS IN A
      NEW PERSPECTIVE.
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. 1983. 362p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI8406464.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 44-12, Section: A, page: 3776.
      Abstract
      This dissertation examines two problems: (1) the sixth-century location of
      the Sklabenoi (Slavs); (2) the role of the Avars in early
      Slavic history. Based on primary written sources, the study
      offers answers that differ substantially from those current in modern
      scholarly literature.

      In Chapter One is sketched the physical geography of the theater of early
      Slavic history, the Danube Basin and the Balkan Peninsula.
      A special emphasis is on the distinction between the domains of herders and
      plowmen.

      Chapter Two gives the history of the migrations of peoples in south-eastern
      Europe from Darius' invasion of Scythia, through the Macedonian expansion, to
      the Roman conquest and retreat from Dacia. The expansion of the Roman Empire
      into the Balkans resulted in northward migrations of native peoples, whereas
      the Roman retreat was caused by a rebounding of these peoples and other
      barbarians beyond the boundaries of Rome. The emergence of the Sklabenoi is
      here cast against this historical background.

      In Chapter Three the pertinent primary sources are discussed. It is shown
      that in the sixth century of our era the homeland of the Sklabenoi was
      located in what are today northern Yugoslavia, Hungary, Slovakia, southern
      Poland, and south-western Ukraine. It is not possible, on the basis of
      written sources, to decide whether the Sklabenoi had immigrated into that
      area or had emerged in situ. The Venethi were not considered in this study.
      However, their and Sklavenic eastern relatives, the Antae, were. It is shown
      that there were two Antias--the larger one north of the Pontic steppes and a
      smaller one in Dacia.

      Chapter Four deals with the conquest of the Balkan Peninsula by the
      Sklabenoi, which began around 520 A.D. Since the Avars arrived on the Roman
      frontier in 558, it was established that they could not have initiated this
      conquest, as is commonly assumed. The problem of Avar-Slav relations is
      examined, and the view that these Asiatic nomads ruled the agricultural Slavs
      was rejected as unsupported by the sources on the period 558-626.


      <22>
      Accession Number
      AAI8209049
      Author
      Farrall, Melissa Lee.
      Title
      A JEWISH TRANSLATOR IN KIEVAN RUS': A CRITICAL EDITION AND STUDY OF THE
      EARLIEST REDACTION OF THE SLAVIC "LIFE OF MOSES".
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--BROWN UNIVERSITY. 1981. 109p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI8209049.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 42-11, Section: A, page: 4822.
      Abstract
      Orthodox Slavic literary culture of the Middle Ages is
      generally acknowledged to have its roots in Byzantine literary culture. From
      the ninth century on, Slavic translators and scribes, in an
      attempt to spread the teachings of the Orthodox Church, translated and copied
      Byzantine works, and in addition creatively borrowed the imagery,
      expressions, and even syntax, from their Greek sources for their own
      compositions. There are, however, a few East Slavic
      translations of the Kievan Period (11-14th centuries) which are distinguished
      from the rest by a very different style, grammar and point of view, and which
      appear to reflect a different religious and cultural background. N. A.
      Mescerskij, in many of his works, suggests that particular East
      Slavic texts, such as the Book of Esther, the Josippon, the
      Book of Enoch and certain apocrypha about Old Testament figures, were
      translated directly from Jewish originals in Hebrew. This dissertation will
      attempt to answer Mescerskij's call for further research on the question, and
      to shed new light on the Semitic component in medieval East
      Slavic culture. The object of this investigation will be
      the apocryphal "Life of Moses." It will be shown that this text was
      translated from a Jewish original in a Semitic language (most probably,
      Hebrew), that the language of the translation is basically Old East
      Slavic which is relatively free from Church Slavonic
      linguistic elements, and that the translation was made in the Kievan Period
      (prior to the fifteenth century).


      <23>
      Accession Number
      AAI8109658
      Author
      Bosley, Richard David.
      Title
      A HISTORY OF THE VENERATION OF SS. THEODOSIJ AND ANTONIJ OF THE KIEVAN CAVES
      MONASTERY, FROM THE ELEVENTH TO THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY.
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--YALE UNIVERSITY. 1980. 224p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI8109658.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 41-11, Section: A, page: 4798.
      Abstract
      The point of departure of this dissertation is the theory first proposed(, ).

      by A. A. Saxmatov that a Life of Antonij, the founder of the Monastery of
      the Caves in Kiev, existed in the Kievan era and was used as a source by the
      compiler of the Primary Chronicle, by Simon and Polikarp, whose epistles were
      included in the Kievan Caves Patericon, and by the monk Kassian in 1462
      before it was lost forever. This theory was later developed by M. D.
      Priselkov, who asserted that certain Grecophile ecclesiastical circles in
      Kiev fostered the veneration of Antonij as a means of discrediting the cult
      of Theodosij which, like the cult of SS. Boris and Gleb, was supposedly an
      expression of Slavic nationalism against Byzantine cultural
      "hegemony".

      The central thesis of the present study is that the theories of Saxmatov(' )
      and Priselkov are erroneous in every respect. No Life of Antonij was ever
      written, either in the Kievan era or thereafter. Antonij was not venerated
      until the beginning of the fifteenth century, and the cult of Theodosij was
      not an expression of nationalist sentiment. The author attempts to explain
      why Theodosij was venerated immediately after his death, and why Antonij was
      forgotten until the beginning of the fifteenth century when there was a
      conscious attempt to revive his memory.

      Chapter One is devoted to the prevailing interpretation of the cult of
      Antonij, and to refuting the theory of the lost Life of the founder of the
      Caves Monastery. Chapter Two reviews the biographies of Antonij and
      Theodosij and retraces the beginning of the cult of Theodosij in the eleventh
      and early twelfth centuries. Chapter Three discusses the development of
      Theodosij's cult after the Kievan era and analyzes the sudden appearance of
      the cult of Antonij about the year 1400.


      <24>
      Accession Number
      AAI8102617
      Author
      Monego, John Edwin.
      Title
      THE SOCIAL AND EDUCATIONAL THOUGHT OF THE NARODNI HUMANISTE IN BOHEMIA,
      1495-1547.
      Institution
      Thesis (PH.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA. 1980. 281p.
      Document Delivery
      Order Number: AAI8102617.
      Source
      Dissertation Abstracts International. Volume: 41-09, Section: A, page: 4059.
      Abstract
      This is a dissertation on the ethically-directed works of five humanist
      authors in early sixteenth-century Bohemia: Viktorin Kornel ze Vsehrd, Rehor
      Hruby z Jelen(')i, Vaclav P(')isecky, Mikulas Konac z Hodiskova, and Oldrich
      Velensky z Mnichova. The dissertation has two objectives: to reassess the
      place accorded these authors in existing studies of Czech cultural history,
      and to determine their place within the framework of European culture of this
      period.

      The first chapter addresses the issue of the European context of Czech
      cultural developments. The author draws on several lines of contemporary
      research in this chapter: P. O. Kristeller's work on the nature of
      Renaissance humanism; the work of C. Trinkaus, H. Oberman and others on the
      spiritual crisis of Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe;
      and F. Graus's work on the nature of Hussitism. The author then surveys in
      detail nineteenth and twentieth-century Czech scholarship on the narodn(')i
      humanismus movement and on each of the men mentioned above. He concludes
      that the existing views should be modified to accommodate stronger
      intellectual ties to Late Medieval culture.

      The traditional view of the narodn(')i humaniste as champions of the Czech
      language and the common man, opponents of the Roman church and the higher
      nobility, has rested largely on the evidence contained in the prefaces which
      they wrote for works which they translated. The second chapter examines a
      number of these prefaces and concludes that previous researchers have
      neglected significant statements in them concerning ethical norms and social
      organization, statements which throw an exceedingly conservative light on
      those passages which these scholars have chosen to emphasize.

      Chapter three is a study of the vocabulary used by the narodn(')i humaniste
      to discuss their ethical and social ideals. A comparison of the Latin
      originals of several ethical works with the Czech translations suggests that
      the Czech versions contained stylistically minor, but intellectually
      significant changes in the Latin texts, with greater weight given by the
      Czech translators to the religious content of the originals. This points to
      a tendency in Bohemia to Christianize classical virtues such as justice, a
      tendency which ran counter to the pattern of secularization of such terms
      noted by Eugene Rice and Quentin Skinner.

      Chapter four describes the concepts of leadership and social organization
      presented in the translated works of the narodn(')i humaniste. Chapter five
      is a discussion of concepts of the individual, with particular attention to
      Velensky's translation of Erasmus's Manual of a Christian Knight (1519).
      Chapter six is a discussion of Hruby's commentary on his own translation of
      Erasmus's Praise of Folly (ca. 1510), Velensky's commentary on the Manual,
      and the ties suggested by these commentaries to Walter Burleigh's Lives and
      Moral Teachings of Virtuous Men, which Konac translated in 1516.

      The author concludes that the narodn(')i humaniste represent<br/><br/>(Message over 64 KB, truncated)
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