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Re: research - travel

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  • Alastair Millar
    Judwiga wrote... ... I wonder... Ignoring draft animals for a moment, a riding horse was a major expense - the archaeological evidence from pre-12th century
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 2, 2000
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      Judwiga wrote...

      >Nowadays, though, there are vet stations, and the horse
      >has to be cooled down, pulse rate dropped to a certain
      >level, checked for dehydration, etc before each team goes
      >on. I doubt the period practice did anything like that.Like
      >the pony express, I am sure they rode till the horse dropped
      >or a remount was gotten.

      I wonder... Ignoring draft animals for a moment, a riding horse was a major
      expense - the archaeological evidence from pre-12th century Bohemia shows
      that such beasts were confined to the "nobility" (i.e. the various bits,
      straps, buckles etc. appear only within the hillforst/enclosures of the
      ruling elites.) It's rather like a modern sports car - noticeable (i.e.
      flashy), expensive, costs a fortune to feed, and has to be maintained by a
      team of specialists... Of course, warhorses (which one would expect to be
      fitter/stronger) had to be specially trained, adding even more to their
      cost...

      Post routes like that of the Mongols or others were an exception, in that
      horses would have been bred by the central authority for the purpose, and in
      the knowledge that the attrition rate might be high (although unless the
      message was REALLY urgent I suspect that the riders wouldn't have belted
      along at maximum speed anyway...).

      Yrs aye

      Alastair
    • MHoll@aol.com
      In a message dated 10/2/2000 2:48:30 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Good point. Although they didn t have vets in period, I suspect each rider knew a lot more
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 2, 2000
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        In a message dated 10/2/2000 2:48:30 PM Central Daylight Time,
        alastair@... writes:

        > It's rather like a modern sports car - noticeable (i.e.
        > flashy), expensive, costs a fortune to feed, and has to be maintained by a
        > team of specialists... Of course, warhorses (which one would expect to be
        > fitter/stronger) had to be specially trained, adding even more to their
        > cost...

        Good point. Although they didn't have vets in period, I suspect each rider
        knew a lot more about horses than most of our riders today, even endurance
        riders (average vs. average, of course; and you'd be surprised how little
        some "horse people" know!). When a living horse is a matter of life and death
        (forget the price for now), I'd think they'd be rather careful.

        Predslava.
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