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Re: [sig] research - travel

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  • Shadow
    ... Someone who knows about horses will have to tell us how many miles a horse usually goes per hour. (a rough estimate.) As a former backpacker traveling with
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 30, 2000
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      MHoll@... wrote:

      > Thanks! That's really useful info!
      >
      > And here's a little tidbit on fast travel.
      >
      > (skipping some math) B. A. Rybakov estimates that when Aleksandr (not yet)
      > Nevskii went from Novgorod to the Neva to fight the Swedes, his fairly small
      > contingent covered 150 km (about 93 miles) in no more than 14 hours with two
      > horses per rider. His courier would have covered this distance in relays in
      > about 8 hours.

      Someone who knows about horses will have to tell us how many miles a horse
      usually goes per hour. (a rough estimate.)

      As a former backpacker traveling with a pack over rough ground, we used to go
      from 10 to 14 miles a day. (14 if you're in better shape.) We had to calcluate
      our daily hike to get from one spring to the next on the Appalachian trail.)

      Leya
    • MHoll@aol.com
      Thanks! That s really useful info! And here s a little tidbit on fast travel. (skipping some math) B. A. Rybakov estimates that when Aleksandr (not yet)
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 30, 2000
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        Thanks! That's really useful info!

        And here's a little tidbit on fast travel.

        (skipping some math) B. A. Rybakov estimates that when Aleksandr (not yet)
        Nevskii went from Novgorod to the Neva to fight the Swedes, his fairly small
        contingent covered 150 km (about 93 miles) in no more than 14 hours with two
        horses per rider. His courier would have covered this distance in relays in
        about 8 hours.

        The Swedes were traveling by boat at a speed of about 5 km/hour (3
        miles/hour).

        I wish they did calculations like that for every trade route in every season!

        Predslava.
      • Alastair Millar
        Hmmm... As it happens, the question of horseback travel times has recently been aired over on Britarch, the big mailing list for British
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 1, 2000
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          Hmmm...
          As it happens, the question of horseback travel times has recently been
          aired over on Britarch, the big mailing list for British
          archaeology/archaeologists. Here are some extracts - note that none of these
          opinions are mine!!!

          _On roads_:

          ""According to Col. Gunter et al with regard to his account of the 'flight
          of Charles II' from Hampshire into Sussex... He was able to travel with the
          King and escort (not military!) at a gentle trot, and including a stop for
          lunch, off the parlimantarian guarded roads, a distance of about 70 mile in
          one instance.""

          "" I have heard old men talk about driving a pony from Norwich to Ipswich
          and back in a day (about 100 miles), admittedly on 20thC roads, and then to
          Cambridge the next day. I have driven my horse 40 miles in a day with no
          trouble.""

          _Cross-Country_:

          ""The Golden Horseshoe ride over Exmoor is the most gruelling endurance ride
          in the world and takes two forms,100 miles over 2 days,or 75 miles, 50 on
          day 1 and 25 on day 2. Most riders are disqualified during the course by vet
          checks. A fit pony could do 30 miles a day for 3 days top whack I'd say. ""

          ""Some years ago I took part in a sponsored "long distance" ride. It was 20
          miles, along forest tracks, and on a fit horse it took me 2 hours.""

          "" it looks like about 30 miles a day is the thing. ""

          HIH

          Alastair
        • Judwiga Czarna Pika
          Hello all!! A horses trot is about 6-8 MPH. A walk, about 4.A gallop, about 12-15. However, there was a pony express rider who did some 120 miles or more on
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 1, 2000
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            Hello all!!
            A horses trot is about 6-8 MPH. A walk, about 4.A gallop, about 12-15.
            However, there was a pony express rider who did some 120 miles or more on
            one horse, as there were no remounts. I remember seeing in a show about
            Mongols that the Khans messengers Could and Did about 100 miles a day. The
            horses were in GOOD shape. There are regularly Endurance riders who do 100
            miles in a race. Nowadays, though, there are vet stations, and the horse
            has to be cooled down, pulse rate dropped to a certain level, checked for
            dehydration, etc before each team goes on. I doubt the period practice did
            anything like that.Like the pony express, I am sure they rode till the
            horse dropped or a remount was gotten.
            Sorry to be so long winded...LOL Take care all!!
            Judwiga



            > Someone who knows about horses will have to tell us how many miles a horse
            > usually goes per hour. (a rough estimate.)
            >
            > As a former backpacker traveling with a pack over rough ground, we used
            to go
            > from 10 to 14 miles a day. (14 if you're in better shape.) We had to
            calcluate
            > our daily hike to get from one spring to the next on the Appalachian
            trail.)
            >
            > Leya


            Judwiga Czarna Pika
          • Alastair Millar
            Judwiga wrote... ... I wonder... Ignoring draft animals for a moment, a riding horse was a major expense - the archaeological evidence from pre-12th century
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 2, 2000
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              Judwiga wrote...

              >Nowadays, though, there are vet stations, and the horse
              >has to be cooled down, pulse rate dropped to a certain
              >level, checked for dehydration, etc before each team goes
              >on. I doubt the period practice did anything like that.Like
              >the pony express, I am sure they rode till the horse dropped
              >or a remount was gotten.

              I wonder... Ignoring draft animals for a moment, a riding horse was a major
              expense - the archaeological evidence from pre-12th century Bohemia shows
              that such beasts were confined to the "nobility" (i.e. the various bits,
              straps, buckles etc. appear only within the hillforst/enclosures of the
              ruling elites.) It's rather like a modern sports car - noticeable (i.e.
              flashy), expensive, costs a fortune to feed, and has to be maintained by a
              team of specialists... Of course, warhorses (which one would expect to be
              fitter/stronger) had to be specially trained, adding even more to their
              cost...

              Post routes like that of the Mongols or others were an exception, in that
              horses would have been bred by the central authority for the purpose, and in
              the knowledge that the attrition rate might be high (although unless the
              message was REALLY urgent I suspect that the riders wouldn't have belted
              along at maximum speed anyway...).

              Yrs aye

              Alastair
            • MHoll@aol.com
              In a message dated 10/2/2000 2:48:30 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Good point. Although they didn t have vets in period, I suspect each rider knew a lot more
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 2, 2000
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                In a message dated 10/2/2000 2:48:30 PM Central Daylight Time,
                alastair@... writes:

                > It's rather like a modern sports car - noticeable (i.e.
                > flashy), expensive, costs a fortune to feed, and has to be maintained by a
                > team of specialists... Of course, warhorses (which one would expect to be
                > fitter/stronger) had to be specially trained, adding even more to their
                > cost...

                Good point. Although they didn't have vets in period, I suspect each rider
                knew a lot more about horses than most of our riders today, even endurance
                riders (average vs. average, of course; and you'd be surprised how little
                some "horse people" know!). When a living horse is a matter of life and death
                (forget the price for now), I'd think they'd be rather careful.

                Predslava.
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