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Book of Veles and the Zorya

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  • tom@tomattic.com
    Can anyone help with info about the history of the Book of Veles. If a hoax then by whom and when? I am writing a novel which has some elements of Slavic
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 17, 2000
      Can anyone help with info about the history of the Book of Veles.
      If a hoax then by whom and when?
      I am writing a novel which has some elements of Slavic mythology and
      would particulary like to tie in the Book of Veles with reference to
      the Zorya. In some ways a hoax is better for me, one work of fiction
      refering to another has a nice irony.
      Also interested in the fact that the Book of Veles is written on
      boards
      (birch wood?) and cannot trace early books of this kind in Eastern
      Europe, a very early one was discovered in the Sahara. Would the
      boards
      have been bound together? What script would have been used and would
      it
      have been carved or burnt into the wood?
      Thanks for any answers to these questions.
      tom
    • Okana
      Most of what information exists about Slavic mythos and beliefs exists in folk legend, customs, and folklore. Where historians gnash their teeth over such an
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 4, 2000
        Most of what information exists about Slavic mythos and beliefs exists in folk
        legend, customs, and folklore. Where historians gnash their teeth
        over such an astounding lack of "proof" of the veracity of any of
        these subjects, anthropologists and folklorists have a plethora of
        sources that delight them. <G> These sources may not be
        adequate for historical accuracy, but they are rich in the remnants
        of such beliefs and pratices. And as to whether these books are
        "made up" or not - remember that ancient East Europeans had little
        if any written documentation; texts written were done so by
        outsiders to the culture of the people, either by missionaries, other
        church representatives, or by "conquering nations", none of which
        can be said to have an unbiased view of events. These then can
        also be said to have been "made up". Surely everyone remembers
        their Anthro 101 course, and the wonderful "research" into the
        Nacirema tribe ::::::chuckle:::::.

        Okana Dnieca


        > And once again, I need to caution all those who are doing historical
        > research -- these books are not sources of historical information. They
        > are made up, and I am annoyed that they continue to be passed as
        > historical fact. There is no historical data about Russian paganism, or
        > Slavic, beyond vague information about a variety of minor magical
        > creatures. The consensus at this time is that Slavic paganism was a
        > shamanistic/agrarian system with no structured Pantheon similar to Greek,
        > Roman, Egyptian, or any other system.
        >
        > The indirect information about Slavic beliefs and rituals hints at some
        > rituals that involved dancing and music, and more specific information
        > coming from questions one parish priest asked of his superior, such as
        > "should the bride be allowed to slice the cheese" -- a direct reference to
        > something we encounter in much later sources about wedding rituals.
        > However, "slicing the cheese" and other tidbits don't paint a picture of
        > Russian paganism, just a few spots of color on a blank canvas.
        >


        The adventure you get is the one that you are ready for.
        -- Joseph Campbell
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