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Re: Russka

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  • Erin Halstad
    Greetings from Nadezhdha Thorinova, I ve actually read some of Russka (when it got out of period, I got distracted I m afraid). Like many of us I m sure, I ve
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 10, 2000
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      Greetings from Nadezhdha Thorinova,

      I've actually read some of Russka (when it got out of period, I got
      distracted I'm afraid). Like many of us I'm sure, I've done a lot of
      research into Russian History and Culture (my first degree is in Slavonic
      Studies/Russian). Rutherford basically designed a fictional town around
      which to base an enormous epic of Russian history. His research is good, in
      the periods that I know best I found little to argue with. Of course, it
      has been a while since I've read it, so maybe I'll try again with a few
      other books nearby for cross-referencing. If I go through with it, I'll let
      you know the results. My major regret with Russka is that Rutherford did
      not do for Russia what he did for the UK. His books Sarum and London are
      based around real places and do not need the cover of an imaginary setting.
      It would have been reasonably easy to do the same for Novgorod, or even
      Moscow and Kiev.
    • Kinjal of Moravia
      I have just finished a re-read of the novel Russka by Edward Rutherfurd. He also has wonderful stories of London , Sarum , the Forest , etc. all are
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 5, 2003
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        I have just finished a re-read of the novel 'Russka' by Edward
        Rutherfurd. He also has wonderful stories of 'London', 'Sarum',
        the 'Forest', etc. all are excellent. It is fictional, but well
        researched and documented. It follows the development of early
        Russia from 180 AD to later centuries and is rich with chants,
        stories and history. You will enjoy it, and I welcome any who can
        correct errors.


        Kinjal
      • MHoll@aol.com
        In a message dated 6/5/2003 11:20:20 AM Central Daylight Time, ... How can it follow something for which there exists no documents and no information? The
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 5, 2003
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          In a message dated 6/5/2003 11:20:20 AM Central Daylight Time,
          gusarimagic@... writes:

          > It follows the development of early
          > Russia from 180 AD to later centuries and is rich with chants,
          > stories and history. You will enjoy it, and I welcome any who can
          > correct errors.
          >

          How can it follow something for which there exists no documents and no
          information? The title alone, which is not Russian in any recognizable pattern,
          turns me off.

          Predslava.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Alex Grant [T]
          Well, fiction is exactly what it is. I heard that Ruska in Finnish means autumn colors. However, for a more believable account of Russian history before Rurik,
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 5, 2003
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            Well, fiction is exactly what it is. I heard that Ruska in Finnish means
            autumn colors.

            However, for a more believable account of Russian history before Rurik, I
            would recommend Rev. S. Lyashevsky's "Prehistoric Rus" a
            historical-archeological research, 1977 (Doistoricheskaya Rus). He looks at
            many historical sources, Byzantine, European, Asian and Slavic, s.a. the
            Book of Veles and little known chronicles of various monastic libraries.

            Alex


            > > It follows the development of early
            > > Russia from 180 AD to later centuries and is rich with chants,
            > > stories and history. You will enjoy it, and I welcome any who can
            > > correct errors.
            > >
            >
            > How can it follow something for which there exists no documents and no
            > information? The title alone, which is not Russian in any recognizable
            pattern,
            > turns me off.
            >
            > Predslava.
          • Kinjal of Moravia
            ... can ... and no ... recognizable pattern, ... Sorry, my posting was meant for enjoyment only. Published by Banlantine Books in 1991. ISBN 0-8041-0972-9
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 5, 2003
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              --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, MHoll@a... wrote:
              > In a message dated 6/5/2003 11:20:20 AM Central Daylight Time,
              > gusarimagic@r... writes:
              >
              > > It follows the development of early
              > > Russia from 180 AD to later centuries and is rich with chants,
              > > stories and history. You will enjoy it, and I welcome any who
              can
              > > correct errors.
              > >
              >
              > How can it follow something for which there exists no documents
              and no
              > information? The title alone, which is not Russian in any
              recognizable pattern,
              > turns me off.
              >
              > Predslava.

              Sorry, my posting was meant for enjoyment only. Published by
              Banlantine Books in 1991. ISBN 0-8041-0972-9

              Library of Congress # 90-34457. Also released by Crown Publishers.

              The title is ficticious, but apparently a town of that name once
              existed, somewhere near Suzdal.
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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