Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [sig] Food Recipes PLEASE!!!

Expand Messages
  • MHoll@aol.com
    In a message dated 7/1/2000 1:15:21 AM Central Daylight Time, ... This could be a Polish recipe, in which I ll let others comment if needed. However, in case
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 1, 2000
      In a message dated 7/1/2000 1:15:21 AM Central Daylight Time,
      Judwiga@... writes:

      > Peroigies, which you maybe can find at Smart and Final, though they call
      > them Ravioli or some such, which you boil as usual, and then grill them
      > with butter and onions.

      This could be a Polish recipe, in which I'll let others comment if needed.

      However, in case anyone thinks this is a Russian recipe, IT IS NOT!

      Pirogi (pee-roh-GEE) are russian pastries -- baked with a variety of
      fillings, in particular cabbage, meat, mushrooms.

      Pirozhki (pee-roh-ZHKEE) are the same thing, bite-sized.

      The boiled-then-grilled (or just boiled) dish is a kind of dumpling in
      Russian cooking, called Pel'meni (pehl-MEH-nee) when filled with meat,
      Varenniki (vah-REHN-nee-kee) when filled with other stuff.

      Recipes are not hard to find. They're not hard to cook, either, just
      time-consuming. And of course, you serve it sour cream!

      *****************************
      Predslava Vydrina
      Per fess embattled azure and gules, two otters passant or.
      <A HREF="http://members.aol.com/Predslava/RussianHistoryTriviaPage.html">Russ
      ian History Trivia Page</A>
      (http://members.aol.com/Predslava/RussianHistoryTriviaPage.html)
    • Jenne Heise
      ... Dembinska claimed that Pirogi (specifically those with buckwheat dough) came from Russia in the 19th century. Lemnis (Old Polish Traditions) says
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 2, 2000
        > > Peroigies, which you maybe can find at Smart and Final, though they call
        > > them Ravioli or some such, which you boil as usual, and then grill them
        > > with butter and onions.
        > This could be a Polish recipe, in which I'll let others comment if needed.

        Dembinska claimed that Pirogi (specifically those with buckwheat dough)
        came from Russia in the 19th century. Lemnis (Old Polish Traditions) says
        otherwise.

        > The boiled-then-grilled (or just boiled) dish is a kind of dumpling in
        > Russian cooking, called Pel'meni (pehl-MEH-nee) when filled with meat,
        > Varenniki (vah-REHN-nee-kee) when filled with other stuff.

        Hm. Could Pirogi be the Polish (Slovak, Czech, etc.) name for Pelmeni?

        Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
        disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
        "My hands are small I know, but they're not yours, they are my own"
      • MHoll@aol.com
        In a message dated 7/2/2000 1:05:31 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Anything is possible. I don t have a Polish dictionary on hand, but that s where I would
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 2, 2000
          In a message dated 7/2/2000 1:05:31 PM Central Daylight Time,
          jenne@... writes:

          > Hm. Could Pirogi be the Polish (Slovak, Czech, etc.) name for Pelmeni?

          Anything is possible. I don't have a Polish dictionary on hand, but that's
          where I would start. As long as we're all straight on the issue that *in
          Russian* pel'meni are boiled (sometimes also fried, usually the second day)
          and that pirogi are bakes pastries, I have no problem with *other* Slavs
          calling them whatever they want... :-)

          Predslava,
          on a crusade to reclaim Russian names for Russian dishes...
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.