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Re: [sig] Russian copyright law

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  • Jenne Heise
    ... Depending on the purpose and character of the infringement... Note that a number of things have changed since 1989 (and heck, even since the 70 s). So,
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 27, 2000
      > The composer was not pleased; he instituted legal action against the
      > choir director. The composer won a judgement of about (as I remember)
      > $100,000 plus legal fees against the choir director.
      > The owner of a copyright does not have to prove damages.

      Depending on the purpose and character of the infringement... Note that a
      number of things have changed since 1989 (and heck, even since the 70's).
      So, don't rely exclusively on information from the 80's. Rather than argue
      about US copyright law, take a look at some good copyright sites,
      including the Library of Congress Copyright office site:
      http://www.loc.gov/copyright/
      and the Stanford Fair Use site:
      http://fairuse.stanford.edu/

      I'm not a copyright lawyer, though I've taken way too many seminars on it.
      I would suggest that you pay special attention to the sections on Fair
      Use.

      Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
      disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
      "My hands are small I know, but they're not yours, they are my own"
    • Patricia Hefner
      ... Oh, my goodness. I suspect cases like this is why our copyright advisor is so restrictive in her interpretation of copyright law. As much as it annoys me
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 27, 2000
        >
        > Not so. You don't have to make money to be liable to an aggressive
        > defender of a copyright. In 1982 or 1983 I took a 1 day introduction
        > to copyright law for non-lawyers. One example used in this introduction
        > has remained in my memory: in the '70's a church choir director
        > (non-paid) made a new arrangement of a copyright tune for a church
        > occasion and gave copies of the arrangement to each member of the
        > choir. The choir director was so pleased with this arrangement that
        > he sent a copy to the composer of the tune.
        >
        > The composer was not pleased; he instituted legal action against the
        > choir director. The composer won a judgement of about (as I remember)
        > $100,000 plus legal fees against the choir director.
        >
        > The owner of a copyright does not have to prove damages.
        >
        > --
        > Waclaw von Pressburg Veritas liberabit uos
        > vaclav@...
        >

        Oh, my goodness. I suspect cases like this is why our copyright advisor is
        so restrictive in her interpretation of copyright law. As much as it annoys
        me at times, I will agree that the SCA can ill afford to get slapped with
        this kind of lawsuit. I still have my doubts about the risk of using
        pictures made in the Soviet Union in 1970. But getting the pictures done by
        an SCA artist cut out any sort of risk. The less risk you take without
        sacrificing the quality of the work the better. The main problem I had was
        the difficulty of communicating with people in Russia right now what with
        the breakdown of their postal service and everything else. So I said to heck
        with it, I'll work with an artist from either the U.S. or Canada. Needless
        to say, I found one.

        Isabelle
        patricia.hefner@...
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