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Gold cord

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  • Michele Frykas
    ... For my sarafan, I used a fabric sold as jaccard table cloth . Don t know if it s period or not, but it looks good and I have seen other gentles from
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 31, 1999
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      >I don't know what kind of fabric to use. It will be December but I don't want
      >to overkill in the heavy fabrics department. I wouldn't want to use a
      >combination of heavy linen (if that's what I end up with) and something like
      >velveteen. Now to find the right kind of gold cord and the right kind of
      >couching thread. I've never done this, so I don't know what to use.

      >Dekuji!
      >Isabelle


      For my sarafan, I used a fabric sold as "jaccard table cloth". Don't know if it's period or not, but it looks good and I have seen other gentles from different groups using different colours of the same thing. Obviously the more natural fibers, the beter. Red fabric and gold cording should be easy to come by soon. Fabric stores are starting to stock up for Christmas.....

      Happy fabric shopping!

      Dzinovia Dubrovna
    • Juliana Taper
      Thank you for your reply! If it is the same cord I m
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 6, 2002
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        Thank you for your reply!

        <<This cord is very easy to work with -- until you have to secure the ends,
        then it gets tricky.>>

        If it is the same cord I'm thinking of, it frays like the dickens.
        Do you sew it under or try to tie it off with your couching thread?

        So many projects, so little time,

        Iul'iana
      • LiudmilaV@aol.com
        In a message dated 8/6/2002 7:00:16 AM Pacific Daylight Time, ... Yes, it frays. As I said, finishing is tricky. Here s my trick: When I come to the end of a
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 7, 2002
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          In a message dated 8/6/2002 7:00:16 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
          jtaper1@... writes:


          > If it is the same cord I'm thinking of, it frays like the dickens.
          > Do you sew it under or try to tie it off with your couching thread?
          >

          Yes, it frays. As I said, finishing is tricky. Here's my trick: When I come
          to the end of a line of embroidery, I make several tight stitches near a
          place I mean to cut the cord. The stitches form a sheath of sorts around it.
          When I cut, I make more stitches to hide the end. Often I sew a pearl right
          there (with white thread) to beautify and protect the end. Still, these
          things often fray on me later -- then some glue-like stuff helps, any kind
          that won't ruin the fabric. This is a little easier to deal with when I am
          sewing this cord around pearl embroidery, because in that case I have to
          connect two ends. When I start, I leave a tail which gets cut later, so it
          has no time to fray. I overlap the ends and sew a sheath around them with my
          couching thread -- before cutting the other tail.

          But yes, it frays like crazy -- but has other advantages that make me
          overlook this flaw.

          Oh -- I haven't tried the thin cord Mistress Su recommends, but I have some
          at home and plan to use it -- I think it should be great with smaller pearls
          and thinner foundation cording.

          Liudmila



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        • Jeanne
          Have you tried putting a dot of Fray Check on the end after you cut. You make your little tube, put a dot of fray check then let dry then finish the end.
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 7, 2002
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            Have you tried putting a dot of "Fray Check" on the end after you cut. You
            make your little tube, put a dot of fray check then let dry then finish the
            end.

            Just a suggestion, works for me.

            Soffya
          • LiudmilaV@aol.com
            In a message dated 8/7/2002 11:29:05 AM Pacific Daylight Time, ... Thank you, Soffya -- I am sure it would work. I guess I am just stubborn, since I try
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 8, 2002
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              In a message dated 8/7/2002 11:29:05 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
              jeanne@... writes:


              > Have you tried putting a dot of "Fray Check" on the end after you cut. You
              > make your little tube, put a dot of fray check then let dry then finish the
              > end.
              >
              >

              Thank you, Soffya -- I am sure it would work. I guess I am just stubborn,
              since I try "natural" method first, and use fray check when it fails. Of
              course, given that the cord is as unnatural as it gets, I think I was being
              rather silly, and should do it your way.

              Liudmila


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            • banavtai
              ... fails. Of course, given that the cord is as unnatural as it gets, I think I was being rather silly, and should do it your way. ... Actually I think the
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 9, 2002
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                > since I try "natural" method first, and use fray check when it
                fails. Of course, given that the cord is as unnatural as it gets, I
                think I was being rather silly, and should do it your way.
                >
                > Liudmila

                Actually I think the combination of the "tube" of couching thread
                topped off with a drop of Fray Check may be best. Not only would it
                make a nicer appearance at the ends, but is extra insurance that all
                your hard work doesn't unravel.

                Of course I tend to be anal retentive anyway ;^D

                Iul'iana
              • suralston
                ... There are two other methods you could try - 1. Thread a longer length (2-4 ) of the gold cord into a larger needle and run cord under the white support
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 12, 2002
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                  Liudmila wrote:
                  > > since I try "natural" method first, and use fray check when it
                  > fails. Of course, given that the cord is as unnatural as it gets,
                  > I think I was being rather silly, and should do it your way.

                  Iil'iana replied:
                  > Actually I think the combination of the "tube" of couching thread
                  > topped off with a drop of Fray Check may be best. Not only would
                  > it make a nicer appearance at the ends, but is extra insurance
                  > that all your hard work doesn't unravel.
                  >
                  > Of course I tend to be anal retentive anyway ;^D

                  There are two other methods you could try -
                  1. Thread a longer length (2-4") of the gold cord into a larger
                  needle and run cord under the white support cording for at least
                  3/4", then trim the gold cord close to the other side of your
                  embroidery

                  2. Again, thread a longer length (1-2") of the gold cord into a
                  larger needle and "plunge" the cord end to the back side of the
                  embroider. You will also need to move your couching thread to the
                  back side and tack the end of the gold cord down. Because the end is
                  now on the inside of the hat, there is less wear on the end and it
                  will not fray on the right side.

                  Su of the Silver Horn, Caid
                  Su Ralston, Fullerton, CA
                • LiudmilaV@aol.com
                  In a message dated 8/12/2002 12:37:07 PM Pacific Daylight Time, ... The first methods sounds appealing, I will try it next time. Unfortunately, the worst
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 12, 2002
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                    In a message dated 8/12/2002 12:37:07 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                    suralston@... writes:


                    > There are two other methods you could try -
                    > 1. Thread a longer length (2-4") of the gold cord into a larger
                    > needle and run cord under the white support cording for at least
                    > 3/4", then trim the gold cord close to the other side of your
                    > embroidery
                    >
                    > 2. Again, thread a longer length (1-2") of the gold cord into a
                    > larger needle and "plunge" the cord end to the back side of the
                    > embroider. You will also need to move your couching thread to the
                    > back side and tack the end of the gold cord down. Because the end is
                    > now on the inside of the hat, there is less wear on the end and it
                    > will not fray on the right side.
                    >

                    The first methods sounds appealing, I will try it next time. Unfortunately,
                    the worst fraying usually occurs on free ends of cord that are not actually
                    surrounding embroidery on a foundation. So, the second method should be
                    good. However, have you actually tried that? I am concerned that the thick
                    cord will ruin the fabric or create a pucker if I pull it through to the
                    other side. I believe that this method was what they used in period though,
                    so maybe...

                    Liudmila


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