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Not slavic, but good book

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  • Amanda Lewanski
    All the discussion of the backwards apron reminded me of the discussion of the evolution of clothing in a book called Women s Work by Elizabeth Wayland
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 3, 2000
      All the discussion of the "backwards apron" reminded me of the
      discussion of the evolution of clothing in a book called "Women's Work"
      by Elizabeth Wayland Barber. Aside from being a very well-written book,
      it's quite enjoyable to read and gave me many of those little "Oooh"
      enlightenment moments. Just thought I'd mention it, even if the focus is
      much broader than Slavic. Considering how late I find out about things,
      you all probably know about it anyway (especially you weaving types; she
      also wrote "The Mummies of Urumchi").

      --Alisandre
    • Robert J Welenc
      ... Work ... Isn t that the one where the author recreated a pre-period plaid from an extant scrap and had a DUH! revelation that she d set up her loom 90
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 4, 2000
        At 10:20 PM 4/3/00 -0500, you wrote:
        >All the discussion of the "backwards apron" reminded me of the
        >discussion of the evolution of clothing in a book called "Women's
        Work"
        >by Elizabeth Wayland Barber.

        Isn't that the one where the author recreated a pre-period plaid from
        an extant scrap and had a "DUH!" revelation that she'd set up her
        loom 90 degrees off from the original?

        Alanna
        ***********
        Saying of the day:
        Ohnosecond: That minuscule fraction of time in which you realize that
        you've just made a horrendous unfixable mistake.
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