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Re: [sig] writing for kids

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  • Krista Harjamaki
    ... thought ... this ... As somebody who knows NOTHING about Russian clothing. Svita = coat is good. However, panova = a sort of apron in reverse draws no
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 3, 2000
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      > OK, another question. I don't want to use too many Russian clothing terms.
      > Should I call the panova "a sort of apron in reverse"? That's what I
      thought
      > the first time I ever saw a picture of one. I'm calling a navershnik "a
      > short tunic worn over the rubakha". I'm calling the svita a "coat". Is
      this
      > OK, or too "watered down"?
      >
      > Isabelle
      > patricia.hefner@...

      As somebody who knows NOTHING about Russian clothing. Svita = coat is good.
      However, panova = "a sort of apron in reverse" draws no image in my mind.
      What do you mean by reverse? Where is it worn? What is its function? And
      the difficulty with your description of navershnik is that I don't know what
      a rubakha is.

      You're writing for kids, you need to paint a picture of these pieces. I
      wouldn't avoid using the terms entirely, but I would describe each one
      everytime its used (unless you use it so frequently, you think the kids will
      learn it). For example, "and to themselves warm on a cold winter's day,
      they would wear a svita, a coat".

      Aveline
    • Diane S. Sawyer
      ... Well, for starters, it s only worn around the waist. Not all aprons have bibs. And it really is more like a wrap skirt than an apron, in that it comes
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 3, 2000
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        --- Krista Harjamaki <klharjamaki@...> wrote:
        > > > It tells me that it probably has a place for tongs in the back
        > and the
        > > > front is open for some reason.
        > >
        > > Actually, that is it, as far as anyone can tell. It's open in
        > front to
        > show
        > > off the embroidery on the shirt.
        > >
        > > Predslava.
        >
        >
        > Then why don't you say "a apron that is worn on the back instead of
        > the
        > front. It covers the back from the shoulders usually all the way
        > down to
        > the knees. The only part that you'd see on the front is the ties."
        >
        > WARNING I made that up based on the information above. It is meant
        > only to
        > be an example of how it could be written.
        >
        > Aveline
        >

        Well, for starters, it's only worn around the waist. Not all aprons
        have bibs. And it really is more like a wrap skirt than an apron, in
        that it comes around the sides of the legs. It's sort of like a
        split skirt, except that it's straight, with very little fullness at
        the top. (I know you didn't know this already; I just wanted to let
        you know.)

        I'd actually say it "resembles" an apron, rather than it "is" an
        apron. Aprons are meant to protect your front from spills and
        stains. Panovas are really good for protecting the back of your
        rubahka from grass stains... though I suppose it could have been
        turned around if need be. Anyone else want to speculate on this?

        Tasha

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