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Re: [sig] writing for kids

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  • MHoll@aol.com
    In a message dated 4/2/2000 8:05:41 PM Central Daylight Time, ... of ... Actually, winter was the preferred time for travel. In spring, travel was made very
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 3, 2000
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      In a message dated 4/2/2000 8:05:41 PM Central Daylight Time,
      patricia.hefner@... writes:

      > Why *exactly* was
      > travel so difficult in Russia in the winter--did people die of hypothermia,
      > were the roads--if indeed there were any, I don't know--screwed up by all
      of
      > the ice and snow, or were there other factors I can't think of right now

      Actually, winter was the preferred time for travel. In spring, travel was
      made very difficult because of mud from melting snow, and the rivers were
      impracticable because of melting ice (rasputitsa [rahs-POO-tee-stah]. In the
      fall, the ground was saturated by the autumn rains. In winter, once the
      rivers froze, they offered the perfect roads for quite a long time (most of
      European Russia is much like the upper Midwest in terms of climate). Then
      once the snow fell, it would become possible to travel *on top of it* (no
      decent roads, no need for snow-plowing).

      These conditions persisted way into the 19th century, and to some extent even
      into the 20th. Although relays and post were an OOP thing, for the rest, more
      modern accounts of travel can offer good insight into the question.

      As for the cold, if you live in that kind of climate, you know how to deal
      with it. Hypothermia is a danger only if you don't bother to dress
      appropriately, or in difficult situations -- being caught in a blizzard,
      losing one's way, etc.

      This is probably why the "Russian winter" is such a mythological concept in
      the West -- not so much because of its severity (although that's relevant
      around the arctic circle), but because Russians knew (and still know) how to
      deal with it, whereas travellers from more temperate climates found it
      difficult.

      Predslava.
    • MHoll@aol.com
      In a message dated 4/3/2000 4:03:53 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Actually, that is it, as far as anyone can tell. It s open in front to show off the
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 3, 2000
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        In a message dated 4/3/2000 4:03:53 PM Central Daylight Time,
        parkrobe@... writes:

        > It tells me that it probably has a place for tongs in the back and the
        > front is open for some reason.

        Actually, that is it, as far as anyone can tell. It's open in front to show
        off the embroidery on the shirt.

        Predslava.
      • Diane S. Sawyer
        ... Actually, except for the bit about the tongs, you re absolutely right; it *is* open in front. It s three panels of fabric sewn together with a channel for
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 3, 2000
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          --- "Robert L. Parker" <parkrobe@...> wrote:
          > I don't understand the "apron in reverse". That makes no sense to
          > me.
          > It tells me that it probably has a place for tongs in the back and
          > the
          > front is open for some reason. Having never seen a panova this
          > would be
          > difficult to understand.
          >
          > 2 Roubles,
          > Sergei
          >

          Actually, except for the bit about the tongs, you're absolutely
          right; it *is* open in front. It's three panels of fabric sewn
          together with a channel for a belt, worn around the waist over the
          rubahka with the opening to the front. ASCII art follows:

          ________________________________
          ===============|__________|__________|__________|==================
          | | | |
          | | | |
          | | | |
          | | | |
          | | | |
          | | | |
          | | | |
          | | | |
          | | | |
          | | | |
          |__________|__________|__________|

          I suppose if you wanted, you could hook the tongs over the
          waistband...

          Hope this helps!

          Tasha


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