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socks, revisited

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  • timbo@xxxxxx.xxx
    From: Jenn/Yana I ve seen references to stockings in later centuries, but as far as I know, Rus peoples (men and women) wore
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 28, 1999
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      From: Jenn/Yana <jdmiller2@...>

      I've seen references to stockings in later centuries, but as far as I know,
      Rus' peoples (men and women) wore strips of cloth wrapped around their legs.

      Actually, there are legions of icons from the later 13th and
      first half of the 14th centuries depicting Russian saints and
      warriors in what appear to be leg wraps. Figures depicted wearing
      low, open shoes and upper calf length close fitting boots (both
      lacking heels) begin to supercede during the second half of the 14th
      century to the end of period. Has anyone considered the posssibility
      that these gaiters could have also been used as an alternative or in
      conjunction with wearing thinner bindings attached dirctly to
      footwear, similar to those used on lapki shoes?
      My references are the icons depicted in
      Lazerev, Viktor Nikitich; The Russian Icon from its origins to the
      sixteenth century; Collegeville, Minnesota; The Liturgical
      Press; 1996; pgs.139, 143, 164, 176, 187, 189, 197, 201, 205,
      210-213

      'dak




      They were woolen, wrapped up the leg in a spiral to the knee and
      about 4-6 inches wide. They might have been fastened with little
      hooks (similar to Ace bandages), although you can just tuck the ends
      in and they stay pretty well. I am making a set for Pennsic,
      although they will not be out of wool or I will scratch my legs raw.
      Maybe they used linen in the summer or underneath the wool.

      Picturing legions of Rus' scratching their legs furiously,

      Yana



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    • MHoll@xxx.xxx
      Acheological evidence shows low boots (ankle boots) and high (calf high) boots, both flat-soled. High-heeled, pointy-toed boots are late (Muscovite era, maybe
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 4, 1999
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        Acheological evidence shows low boots (ankle boots) and high (calf high)
        boots, both flat-soled. High-heeled, pointy-toed boots are late (Muscovite
        era, maybe only 16th century on).

        From what my mother remembers (and I will be asking a lot of questions like
        that pretty soon, she's coming to stay with us, yeah!), leg wraps were indeed
        tied with the laces used on lapti (woven bast shoes), and probably under
        boots as well.

        To my mind, if it makes it easier to wear, someone would have come up with
        the idea, and someone would have done it. If it's logical, it's probable.

        And in the summer, what's wrong with wearing lightweight low boots over bare
        feet? We wear close-toed sandals, how far is that to shoes?

        Predslava.
        (Not up to leg wraps, yet, not until both girls can put their socks on by
        themselves, and the rest of the garb as well).
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