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Re: Nations: Back to the Future

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  • Alastair Millar
    ... I think that it is clear that some of these categories go back to the period *before* the Slavic expansion - hence the different groups settling in
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 23, 2000
      Bob / Svyatoslav wrote:


      >"How far back do today's categories go???

      I think that it is clear that some of these categories go back to the period
      *before* the Slavic expansion - hence the different groups settling in
      Bohemia, for example.

      The Slavic migration into Europe was the last act of the "Migration Period"
      (or 'Wandersage' as our German friends put it), and much of the confusion
      seems to stem from the actions of the different incoming groups. I tend to
      agree with the eminent Czech historian Dus'an Tr'es'tik, who identifies two
      main flows - one north of the Carpathians, and one in the south, testing the
      borders of the Byzantine Empire. Settlers in Bohemia during the 7th century
      found themselves trying to accomodate an influx of still-migrant northbound
      Slavs in the 8th, for example.

      Some ethnic (?) groups seem to have contributed members to each of the main
      flows - so there were the (now-vanished) Croats in Bohemia, while even today
      there are Czech-speaking "remnant" minorities in Croatia and the Ukraine. We
      shouldn't let this surprise us - the Celtic migrations across Europe took
      the same pattern, so that for example the Boii were split between Bohemia
      and the Po valley in Italy. (Caesar's "Gallic War" explains why).

      >{In Slovak, they name their country Slovensko; and in Slovenia,
      >I think, they name their country Slovenska}.

      FWIW, Czech has 'Slovensko' (Slovakia), 'Slovinsko' (Slovenia), and
      'Slovacko' (Moravian Slovakia), while *very* occasionally Slovankso is
      mooted for some sort of Pan-Slavonia. "Srb" can refer to either a Balkan
      Serb or a Lusatian Serb (Sorb), while historically Chorvat/Charvat could
      refer to either a Balkan Croat or a Bohemian Croat. Makes translating fun...

      >Not easy issues, these.

      Beautifully understated...

      Yours aye

      Alastair in Prague
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