Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: baggy pants

Expand Messages
  • Diane S. Sawyer
    ... {snip} ... http://www.atinet.com.au/~quarfwa/Miklagard/Costume/Rus/Trader ... I ve seen this site, and love the outfit they recreated. The question on the
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 7, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      --- timbo@... wrote:
      > From: timbo@...
      >
      {snip}
      > But the discussion is "baggy" pants. No one said
      > they were Russian,
      > just that they were apparently fashionable there, as
      > recorded by
      > various arab travelers and in numerous Norse sagas.
      > Both cultures had
      > at least minimal contact with and interaction with
      > Early Russian
      > cultures.
      > I do not know if this will load or not, but I have
      > listed an
      > interesting website below which partially addresses
      > this subject. You
      > may have to tweek it a bit but its a good site.
      > 'dak
      >
      >
      http://www.atinet.com.au/~quarfwa/Miklagard/Costume/Rus/Trader
      >

      I've seen this site, and love the outfit they
      recreated.

      The question on the SCA-Garb list was if those
      ultra-baggy, half-again-as-long-as-one's-leg,
      drawstring-at-the-ankle pants that are ubiquitous in
      the SCA are period, and someone mentioned that they
      might be for Russia. I have a feeling that they might
      be thinking of post-period Cossacks, since the
      pictures I've seen have either been very Byzantine-ish
      or show loose, but straight-legged trousers.

      As for the comment about loose pants being worn by
      nomads, I concur. Not too loose, though. I wore
      mundane navy blue chinos with my del this weekend and
      tucked them into boots. Very comfy, and at the end of
      the event, I took off the del, put on the sweatshirt,
      changed my shoes, and voila! Ready to go home. Of
      couse, I've started the embroidery that I'm going to
      applique onto my new pants, and the dragons for the
      sleeves are in planning. Somehow I think this might
      end up very Chinese...

      Tasha
      __________________________________________________
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Talk to your friends online with Yahoo! Messenger.
      http://im.yahoo.com
    • Jenne Heise
      ... AH! now I understand. When you said baggy pants I was thinking rapper pants (the kind with the big thighs and wierd crotch, like Turkish pants) not
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 8, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        > The question on the SCA-Garb list was if those
        > ultra-baggy, half-again-as-long-as-one's-leg,
        > drawstring-at-the-ankle pants that are ubiquitous in
        > the SCA are period, and someone mentioned that they
        > might be for Russia. I have a feeling that they might
        > be thinking of post-period Cossacks, since the
        > pictures I've seen have either been very Byzantine-ish
        > or show loose, but straight-legged trousers.

        AH! now I understand. When you said 'baggy pants' I was thinking 'rapper
        pants' (the kind with the big thighs and wierd crotch, like Turkish pants)
        not 'extra-long leg pants'!

        Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
        disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me...

        "You do not lead by hitting people over the head -- that's assault,
        not leadership." Dwight D. Eisenhower
      • timbo@marcon.org
        Noemi has a good point about baggy pants being a nomadic clothing style but lets consider for a moment how many garment styles Russians have borrowed from
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 8, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          Noemi has a good point about baggy pants being a nomadic clothing
          style but lets consider for a moment how many garment styles Russians
          have "borrowed" from surrounding cultures. Caftans from central asia,
          who knows how much from Byzantium in the Kievian period. Mix in the
          Cumans, Bulgars, Vikings,etc. and what we have is a lot of
          "borrowing" between all the cultures in Russian history. In the
          Moscovite period, one could easily make an argument that both Persian
          and Ottoman (the last Turkic wave to hit Russia) fashions majorly
          influenced Russian fashion, just as it did with Poland, Hungary,
          Wallachia, Moldavia, etc.
          But the discussion is "baggy" pants. No one said they were Russian,
          just that they were apparently fashionable there, as recorded by
          various arab travelers and in numerous Norse sagas. Both cultures had
          at least minimal contact with and interaction with Early Russian
          cultures.
          I do not know if this will load or not, but I have listed an
          interesting website below which partially addresses this subject. You
          may have to tweek it a bit but its a good site.
          'dak

          http://www.atinet.com.au/~quarfwa/Miklagard/Costume/Rus/Trader









          To: SIG-List <sig@onelist.com>
          Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2000 18:50:35 -0600
          From: Jenn/Yana <jdmiller2@...>
          Reply-to: sig@onelist.com
          Subject: [sig] kvas recipes

          From: Jenn/Yana <jdmiller2@...>

          I tried sending this before, but my mailer apparently hicupped. Apologies
          if it gets sent twice.

          --Yana

          In respose to Jadwiga's comment on kvas as a soup base:

          Kvas as a soup base is not odd at all. Even the Domostroi mentions using
          kvas as a cooking or breadmaking ingredient (Pouncy:126). Here are two
          modern recipes. In the first recipe kvas is used as a base/seasoning in a
          cold soup. The second one is actually a recipe for kvas, but it does say
          that kvas is a beverage as well as a soup base.

          MMMMM----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05

          Title "Okroshka"
          Categories Russian
          Yield 8 servings

          3 ea hard boiled eggs
          4 ea boiled peeled potatoes
          2 ea cucumbers
          300 g boiled meat
          3 tb chopped spring onions
          1 c sour cream
          1 l Kvas to taste
          salt to taste
          sugar to taste
          pepper


          Chop all ingredients in 1/4 inch dices, add salt, sugar and spring
          onions. Stir very well. Put in the fridge for 1-2 hours.
          Add Kvas, sugar, salt on your taste, sour cream. Don't pour all
          kvas and sour cream if you are not sure you will eat everything.

          Okroshka is kept very well in the fridge without Kvas during
          several days.

          Okroshka is served chilled down with greens.
          MMMMM

          MMMMM----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05

          Title Kvas <mint-Flavored Bread Beer Soup>
          Categories Kazakh, Soup, Ethnic, Russian, Sidedish
          Yield 6 Servings

          1 lb Stale black bread
          - or -
          1 lb Pumpernickel bread, stale
          1 c Sugar
          2 tb Raisins
          2 tb Mint leaves, fresh
          - or -
          1 tb Dried mint leaves
          2 tb Active dry yeast
          1/4 c Luke warm water

          **NOTE** Water must be hot as it will kill the yeast. Oven must be
          preheated to 200 degrees F. Cube bread then spread on a cookie heet and
          place in oven for 1 hour. Bring 6 quarts of water to a boil and drop in the
          bread.. Remove from heat, cover with a towel, & allow to sit at room
          temperature for 8 hours. Strain through a fine seive by pressing the
          moistuire from the bread. Sprinkle the yeast & 1/4 teaspoon of sugar over
          the cup of lukewarm water and stir to dissolve the yeast completely. Set
          aside in a warm place covered by a towel for approx. 10-12 minutes or
          until. mixture doubles in volume. Add the mint leaves, and remaining sugar,
          stir well then re-cover with the towel and set aside for 8-12 hours more at
          room temperature.

          Again strain the mixture through a fine seive. Pour into a 1 gal.
          container, add the raisins, cover the top with plastic wrap, secure with a
          rubber band, and place in cool NOT cold, spot for 4-5 days or until the
          raisins are floating and the sediment has sunk to the bottom. Pour off the
          clear amber liquid and rebottle in a clean jug or bottles. refrigerate
          until ready to use. In Russia this is a beverage as well as cold soup stock.

          ORIGIN Dr. Sergei Betschonov, Uralsk-Kazakhstan, circa 1995
          From Dr. Donald Houston

          MMMMM

          --------------------------- ONElist Sponsor ----------------------------

          Unique Valentine gifts, available now at eGroups.
          <a href=" http://clickme.onelist.com/ad/SparksValentine2 ">Click Here</a>

          ------------------------------------------------------------------------

          Slavic Interest Group homepage:
          http://www.uwplatt.edu/~goldschp/slavic.html
        • MHoll@aol.com
          In a message dated 2/7/2000 4:36:14 PM Central Standard Time, ... That s what I think, too. ... No, I can t imagine riding all day in way-loose pants. It would
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 8, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            In a message dated 2/7/2000 4:36:14 PM Central Standard Time,
            tasha_medved@... writes:

            > I have a feeling that they might
            > be thinking of post-period Cossacks

            That's what I think, too.

            > As for the comment about loose pants being worn by
            > nomads, I concur. Not too loose, though.

            No, I can't imagine riding all day in way-loose pants. It would chafe
            eventually, or else you develop calluses. Ick. Or they must have had
            something close-fitting underneath.

            Predslava,
            familiar with saddles chafing because she just doesn't get to ride as much as
            she wants.
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.