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Re: East European food...

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  • MHoll@aol.com
    In a message dated 2/1/2000 2:03:59 PM Central Standard Time, ... I vaguely recall that Asian nomads ate horseflesh. To this day, it s not considered normal
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 1, 2000
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      In a message dated 2/1/2000 2:03:59 PM Central Standard Time,
      jdmiller2@... writes:

      > Their foodways (religious restrictions and the like) may have been
      > influenced, but I see very little influence in the actual foods (what they
      > ate, as opposed to why or how they ate it).

      I vaguely recall that Asian nomads ate horseflesh. To this day, it's not
      considered "normal" food by Russians, and the medieval Chronicles noted the
      fact of horse-eating as a sign of extreme famine. Food restrictions in period
      were far more stringent than they are today, and Christian Orthodoxy demands
      much greater adherence to restrictions during Great Lent and all the other
      smaller fast periods and days (well, I always fail in this, but my mother is
      very strict).

      These considerations, and the differences (later) between Muslim and
      Christian dietary restrictions would have prohibited too much mutual
      influence.

      As for "bean greens" vs "beet greens", I offer another possibility, but I
      would need to see the original to be certain. In Russian, less in modern that
      old, the adjective (green) could be placed before the noun (beans) in a way
      that would sound today odd and stilted. Thus, word for word, "bean greens" --
      <boby zelenye> -- would actually mean "green beans", and bring us to familiar
      ground.

      Just a few thoughts.

      Predslava,
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