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Mens jewelry

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  • Joseph Belcher
    There is information available about early period Rus women’s jewelry. Below are two examples. But what about the men!? I have found no mention of early
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 29 8:56 AM
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      There is information available about early period Rus women’s jewelry. Below are two examples. But what about the men!? I have found no mention of early period Rus men wearing jewelry (nor have I found anything saying they did not).

      Is there any information about men’s jewelry in or around 10th century Novgorod?

      Via Sofya la Rus, at http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/webdocs/mnm_mt27.pdf

      At the beginning of the 10th century especially, noble costume was ornamented with kolti, beads, nachilniki, and sequins. Earrings were not particularly common from the 10th-13th centuries, but bracelets, rings, beads and necklaces were. The majority of jewelry was made of metal. Peasant jewelry was of copper, bronze or low-grade silver. Noble jewelry was of silver, and sometimes gold. Jewelers techniques included pearlwork, silverwork, filigree and enamel. Small embossed coins, engravings, stampings, castings, zern (solder for making tiny metal grains), filigree, and black and partitioned enamel were among the techniques mastered in Kiev. Tin sequins of various forms were sewn in ornamental bands and stripes on the yoke, etc. of clothing and frequently had gems attached to them. Jewelry was often designed for individual commissions. Gold and silver jewelry with precious and semiprecious stones was often passed down for many generations.


      Via Ibn Fadlan, at http://www.library.cornell.edu/colldev/mideast/montgo1.pdf

      Each woman has, on her breast, a small disc, tied <around her neck>, made of either iron, silver, copper or gold, in relation to her husband’s financial and social worth. Each disc has a ring to which a dagger is attached, also lying on her breast. Around their necks they wear bands of gold and silver. Whenever a man’s wealth reaches ten thousand dirhams, he has a band made for his wife; if it reaches twenty thousand dirhams, he has two bands made for her—for every ten thousand more, he gives another band to his wife. Sometimes one woman may wear many bands around her neck. The jewelry which they prize the most is the dark-green ceramic beads which they have aboard their boats and which they value very highly: they purchase beads for a dirham a piece and string them together as necklaces for their wives.

      -Halbrust


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