Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Birch bark letters

Expand Messages
  • Joseph Belcher
    I’m doing research on the birch bark letters from Novgorod. There is a decent amount of information available, but I have yet to find out what was used to
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 18 7:57 AM
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      I’m doing research on the birch bark letters from Novgorod. There is a decent amount of information available, but I have yet to find out what was used to write with.
      I haven’t read a single thing about ink analysis, charcoal remains, or impressions from a stylus. Nothing.
      Can someone point me towards the answer?

      -Halbrust


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jennifer Nelson Kemp
      You can write on birch bark with basically anything that will mark it. One thing that surprised my husband and I when we saw the actual archeological objects
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 18 8:00 AM
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        You can write on birch bark with basically anything that will mark it. One
        thing that surprised my husband and I when we saw the actual archeological
        objects is that the impressions on the bark were quite hard. We've used
        slightly sharpened antler and bone as well as the stylus's for wax tablets
        to great effect. I'd have to read through Drevnia'a Rus and the Novgorod
        dig books to see if the they tell us where/what the stylii were used on.

        Ian'ka


        On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 7:57 AM, Joseph Belcher <iegrappling@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        >
        > I�m doing research on the birch bark letters from Novgorod. There is a
        > decent amount of information available, but I have yet to find out what was
        > used to write with.
        > I haven�t read a single thing about ink analysis, charcoal remains, or
        > impressions from a stylus. Nothing.
        > Can someone point me towards the answer?
        >
        > -Halbrust
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • goldschp tds.net
        I ve seen numerous depictions of the styli that have been dug up in Novgorod (that were used for birchbarks or for waxed tablets). Primarily, they are made of
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 18 8:21 AM
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          I've seen numerous depictions of the styli that have been dug up in
          Novgorod (that were used for birchbarks or for waxed tablets). Primarily,
          they are made of metal, but that may just be because of what survives being
          buried?

          Russian books tend to go immediately out of print after being published,
          but it shouldn't be hard to find pictures. If it becomes too hard, let me
          know and I can mail you a scan.

          Paul Wickenden


          On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Jennifer Nelson Kemp <lady.ianuk@...
          > wrote:

          > You can write on birch bark with basically anything that will mark it. One
          > thing that surprised my husband and I when we saw the actual archeological
          > objects is that the impressions on the bark were quite hard. We've used
          > slightly sharpened antler and bone as well as the stylus's for wax tablets
          > to great effect. I'd have to read through Drevnia'a Rus and the Novgorod
          > dig books to see if the they tell us where/what the stylii were used on.
          >
          > Ian'ka
          >
          >
          > On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 7:57 AM, Joseph Belcher <iegrappling@...>
          > wrote:
          >
          > > **
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > I�m doing research on the birch bark letters from Novgorod. There is a
          > > decent amount of information available, but I have yet to find out what
          > was
          > > used to write with.
          > > I haven�t read a single thing about ink analysis, charcoal remains, or
          > > impressions from a stylus. Nothing.
          > > Can someone point me towards the answer?
          > >
          > > -Halbrust
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Joseph Belcher
          Thank you both. Are youe saying they were scratched insead of wrote on, like a wax tablet is? No ink or other colorant was used? -Halbrust ... From: goldschp
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 18 8:49 AM
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            Thank you both.
            Are youe saying they were 'scratched' insead of wrote on, like a wax tablet is? No ink or other colorant was used?

            -Halbrust

            -----Original Message-----
            From: goldschp tds.net <goldschp@...>
            To: sig <sig@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thu, Apr 18, 2013 8:21 am
            Subject: Re: [sig] Birch bark letters


            I've seen numerous depictions of the styli that have been dug up in
            ovgorod (that were used for birchbarks or for waxed tablets). Primarily,
            hey are made of metal, but that may just be because of what survives being
            uried?
            Russian books tend to go immediately out of print after being published,
            ut it shouldn't be hard to find pictures. If it becomes too hard, let me
            now and I can mail you a scan.
            Paul Wickenden

            n Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Jennifer Nelson Kemp <lady.ianuk@...
            wrote:
            > You can write on birch bark with basically anything that will mark it. One
            thing that surprised my husband and I when we saw the actual archeological
            objects is that the impressions on the bark were quite hard. We've used
            slightly sharpened antler and bone as well as the stylus's for wax tablets
            to great effect. I'd have to read through Drevnia'a Rus and the Novgorod
            dig books to see if the they tell us where/what the stylii were used on.

            Ian'ka


            On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 7:57 AM, Joseph Belcher <iegrappling@...>
            wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            >
            > I�m doing research on the birch bark letters from Novgorod. There is a
            > decent amount of information available, but I have yet to find out what
            was
            > used to write with.
            > I haven�t read a single thing about ink analysis, charcoal remains, or
            > impressions from a stylus. Nothing.
            > Can someone point me towards the answer?
            >
            > -Halbrust
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links





            Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            ------------------------------------
            Yahoo! Groups Links
            Individual Email | Traditional
            http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • goldschp tds.net
            That was my understanding. They scratched the words. It matches the style of the writing, which resembles carving. Paul ... [Non-text portions of this
            Message 5 of 12 , Apr 18 8:50 AM
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              That was my understanding. They scratched the words. It matches the style
              of the writing, which resembles carving.

              Paul
              On Apr 18, 2013 10:49 AM, "Joseph Belcher" <iegrappling@...> wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              >
              > Thank you both.
              > Are youe saying they were 'scratched' insead of wrote on, like a wax
              > tablet is? No ink or other colorant was used?
              >
              > -Halbrust
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: goldschp tds.net <goldschp@...>
              > To: sig <sig@yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Thu, Apr 18, 2013 8:21 am
              > Subject: Re: [sig] Birch bark letters
              >
              > I've seen numerous depictions of the styli that have been dug up in
              > ovgorod (that were used for birchbarks or for waxed tablets). Primarily,
              > hey are made of metal, but that may just be because of what survives being
              > uried?
              > Russian books tend to go immediately out of print after being published,
              > ut it shouldn't be hard to find pictures. If it becomes too hard, let me
              > now and I can mail you a scan.
              > Paul Wickenden
              >
              > n Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Jennifer Nelson Kemp <
              > lady.ianuk@...
              > wrote:
              > > You can write on birch bark with basically anything that will mark it.
              > One
              > thing that surprised my husband and I when we saw the actual archeological
              > objects is that the impressions on the bark were quite hard. We've used
              > slightly sharpened antler and bone as well as the stylus's for wax tablets
              > to great effect. I'd have to read through Drevnia'a Rus and the Novgorod
              > dig books to see if the they tell us where/what the stylii were used on.
              >
              > Ian'ka
              >
              > On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 7:57 AM, Joseph Belcher <iegrappling@...>
              > wrote:
              >
              > > **
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > I�m doing research on the birch bark letters from Novgorod. There is a
              > > decent amount of information available, but I have yet to find out what
              > was
              > > used to write with.
              > > I haven�t read a single thing about ink analysis, charcoal remains, or
              > > impressions from a stylus. Nothing.
              > > Can someone point me towards the answer?
              > >
              > > -Halbrust
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              > Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > Individual Email | Traditional
              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jennifer Nelson Kemp
              Yes, the birch bark takes the impression really well. No ink is needed. The birch changes color a bit where you ve pressed into the surface. It helps to have
              Message 6 of 12 , Apr 18 8:57 AM
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                Yes, the birch bark takes the impression really well. No ink is needed.
                The birch changes color a bit where you've pressed into the surface. It
                helps to have a stylus with a point but it doesn't need to be sharp at all.

                I always describe these to people as the Rus Post-it note since you find
                things from letters to grocery lists to kids practice writing/doodles.

                If you do a google image search for birch bark letters you will see how
                deep the impressions are on the letters and you can see a few pictures from
                the Novgorod dig book with a stylus.

                Ian'ka


                On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 8:50 AM, goldschp tds.net <goldschp@...> wrote:

                > **
                >
                >
                > That was my understanding. They scratched the words. It matches the style
                > of the writing, which resembles carving.
                >
                > Paul
                >
                > On Apr 18, 2013 10:49 AM, "Joseph Belcher" <iegrappling@...> wrote:
                >
                > > **
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Thank you both.
                > > Are youe saying they were 'scratched' insead of wrote on, like a wax
                > > tablet is? No ink or other colorant was used?
                > >
                > > -Halbrust
                > >
                > > -----Original Message-----
                > > From: goldschp tds.net <goldschp@...>
                > > To: sig <sig@yahoogroups.com>
                > > Sent: Thu, Apr 18, 2013 8:21 am
                > > Subject: Re: [sig] Birch bark letters
                > >
                > > I've seen numerous depictions of the styli that have been dug up in
                > > ovgorod (that were used for birchbarks or for waxed tablets). Primarily,
                > > hey are made of metal, but that may just be because of what survives
                > being
                > > uried?
                > > Russian books tend to go immediately out of print after being published,
                > > ut it shouldn't be hard to find pictures. If it becomes too hard, let me
                > > now and I can mail you a scan.
                > > Paul Wickenden
                > >
                > > n Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Jennifer Nelson Kemp <
                > > lady.ianuk@...
                > > wrote:
                > > > You can write on birch bark with basically anything that will mark it.
                > > One
                > > thing that surprised my husband and I when we saw the actual
                > archeological
                > > objects is that the impressions on the bark were quite hard. We've used
                > > slightly sharpened antler and bone as well as the stylus's for wax
                > tablets
                > > to great effect. I'd have to read through Drevnia'a Rus and the Novgorod
                > > dig books to see if the they tell us where/what the stylii were used on.
                > >
                > > Ian'ka
                > >
                > > On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 7:57 AM, Joseph Belcher <iegrappling@...>
                > > wrote:
                > >
                > > > **
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > I�m doing research on the birch bark letters from Novgorod. There is a
                > > > decent amount of information available, but I have yet to find out what
                > > was
                > > > used to write with.
                > > > I haven�t read a single thing about ink analysis, charcoal remains, or
                > > > impressions from a stylus. Nothing.
                > > > Can someone point me towards the answer?
                > > >
                > > > -Halbrust
                > > >
                > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > > ------------------------------------
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > > Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > > ------------------------------------
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > > Individual Email | Traditional
                > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Anya Stickney
                Drevnia Rus Byt i Kultura has 1 page of pictures and 10 pages of descriptions about birch bark letters. Here are the highlights of the 1st paragraph ... 1.
                Message 7 of 12 , Apr 18 9:12 AM
                View Source
                • 0 Attachment
                  "Drevnia Rus Byt i Kultura" has 1 page of pictures and 10 pages of
                  descriptions about birch bark letters. Here are the highlights of the 1st
                  paragraph ...

                  1. Preparation: After rubbing off the brittle bits from the inside, boil
                  with alkalines to give the bark more elasticity. But there are many
                  examples of reusing unworked bark as well.

                  2. Writing was done with a bone or metal stylus. (This is what Her Highness
                  Ian'ka said). Out of 885 letters found, only 2 have ink. The styluses were
                  used for both birch bark and tablets. The writing was done with the
                  sharpened pointed end, and the wide flattened end was used to smooth out
                  the written area to correct mistakes.

                  Let me know if you'd like more info about the book.

                  Lady Anya Sergeeva


                  On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 8:50 AM, goldschp tds.net <goldschp@...> wrote:

                  > **
                  >
                  >
                  > That was my understanding. They scratched the words. It matches the style
                  > of the writing, which resembles carving.
                  >
                  > Paul
                  >
                  > On Apr 18, 2013 10:49 AM, "Joseph Belcher" <iegrappling@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > **
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Thank you both.
                  > > Are youe saying they were 'scratched' insead of wrote on, like a wax
                  > > tablet is? No ink or other colorant was used?
                  > >
                  > > -Halbrust
                  > >
                  > > -----Original Message-----
                  > > From: goldschp tds.net <goldschp@...>
                  > > To: sig <sig@yahoogroups.com>
                  > > Sent: Thu, Apr 18, 2013 8:21 am
                  > > Subject: Re: [sig] Birch bark letters
                  > >
                  > > I've seen numerous depictions of the styli that have been dug up in
                  > > ovgorod (that were used for birchbarks or for waxed tablets). Primarily,
                  > > hey are made of metal, but that may just be because of what survives
                  > being
                  > > uried?
                  > > Russian books tend to go immediately out of print after being published,
                  > > ut it shouldn't be hard to find pictures. If it becomes too hard, let me
                  > > now and I can mail you a scan.
                  > > Paul Wickenden
                  > >
                  > > n Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Jennifer Nelson Kemp <
                  > > lady.ianuk@...
                  > > wrote:
                  > > > You can write on birch bark with basically anything that will mark it.
                  > > One
                  > > thing that surprised my husband and I when we saw the actual
                  > archeological
                  > > objects is that the impressions on the bark were quite hard. We've used
                  > > slightly sharpened antler and bone as well as the stylus's for wax
                  > tablets
                  > > to great effect. I'd have to read through Drevnia'a Rus and the Novgorod
                  > > dig books to see if the they tell us where/what the stylii were used on.
                  > >
                  > > Ian'ka
                  > >
                  > > On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 7:57 AM, Joseph Belcher <iegrappling@...>
                  > > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > **
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > I�m doing research on the birch bark letters from Novgorod. There is a
                  > > > decent amount of information available, but I have yet to find out what
                  > > was
                  > > > used to write with.
                  > > > I haven�t read a single thing about ink analysis, charcoal remains, or
                  > > > impressions from a stylus. Nothing.
                  > > > Can someone point me towards the answer?
                  > > >
                  > > > -Halbrust
                  > > >
                  > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > > ------------------------------------
                  > >
                  > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > >
                  > > Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > > ------------------------------------
                  > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > > Individual Email | Traditional
                  > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Tim Nalley
                  Thank you! Does anyone have any sources of birch bark suitable for embossing with a stylus for purchase? dok From my Android phone on T-Mobile. The first
                  Message 8 of 12 , Apr 18 9:58 AM
                  View Source
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thank you! Does anyone have any sources of birch bark suitable for embossing with a stylus for purchase?
                    'dok


                    From my Android phone on T-Mobile. The first nationwide 4G network.

                    -------- Original message --------
                    Subject: Re: [sig] Birch bark letters
                    From: Anya Stickney <anyas5@...>
                    To: sig@yahoogroups.com
                    CC:

                    "Drevnia Rus Byt i Kultura" has 1 page of pictures and 10 pages of
                    descriptions about birch bark letters. Here are the highlights of the 1st
                    paragraph ...

                    1. Preparation: After rubbing off the brittle bits from the inside, boil
                    with alkalines to give the bark more elasticity. But there are many
                    examples of reusing unworked bark as well.

                    2. Writing was done with a bone or metal stylus. (This is what Her Highness
                    Ian'ka said). Out of 885 letters found, only 2 have ink. The styluses were
                    used for both birch bark and tablets. The writing was done with the
                    sharpened pointed end, and the wide flattened end was used to smooth out
                    the written area to correct mistakes.

                    Let me know if you'd like more info about the book.

                    Lady Anya Sergeeva

                    On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 8:50 AM, goldschp tds.net <goldschp@...> wrote:

                    > **
                    >
                    >
                    > That was my understanding. They scratched the words. It matches the style
                    > of the writing, which resembles carving.
                    >
                    > Paul
                    >
                    > On Apr 18, 2013 10:49 AM, "Joseph Belcher" <iegrappling@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > **
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Thank you both.
                    > > Are youe saying they were 'scratched' insead of wrote on, like a wax
                    > > tablet is? No ink or other colorant was used?
                    > >
                    > > -Halbrust
                    > >
                    > > -----Original Message-----
                    > > From: goldschp tds.net <goldschp@...>
                    > > To: sig <sig@yahoogroups.com>
                    > > Sent: Thu, Apr 18, 2013 8:21 am
                    > > Subject: Re: [sig] Birch bark letters
                    > >
                    > > I've seen numerous depictions of the styli that have been dug up in
                    > > ovgorod (that were used for birchbarks or for waxed tablets). Primarily,
                    > > hey are made of metal, but that may just be because of what survives
                    > being
                    > > uried?
                    > > Russian books tend to go immediately out of print after being published,
                    > > ut it shouldn't be hard to find pictures. If it becomes too hard, let me
                    > > now and I can mail you a scan.
                    > > Paul Wickenden
                    > >
                    > > n Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Jennifer Nelson Kemp <
                    > > lady.ianuk@...
                    > > wrote:
                    > > > You can write on birch bark with basically anything that will mark it.
                    > > One
                    > > thing that surprised my husband and I when we saw the actual
                    > archeological
                    > > objects is that the impressions on the bark were quite hard. We've used
                    > > slightly sharpened antler and bone as well as the stylus's for wax
                    > tablets
                    > > to great effect. I'd have to read through Drevnia'a Rus and the Novgorod
                    > > dig books to see if the they tell us where/what the stylii were used on.
                    > >
                    > > Ian'ka
                    > >
                    > > On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 7:57 AM, Joseph Belcher <iegrappling@...>
                    > > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > **
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > I�m doing research on the birch bark letters from Novgorod. There is a
                    > > > decent amount of information available, but I have yet to find out what
                    > > was
                    > > > used to write with.
                    > > > I haven�t read a single thing about ink analysis, charcoal remains, or
                    > > > impressions from a stylus. Nothing.
                    > > > Can someone point me towards the answer?
                    > > >
                    > > > -Halbrust
                    > > >
                    > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > > ------------------------------------
                    > >
                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > > Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > > ------------------------------------
                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > > Individual Email | Traditional
                    > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Anya Stickney
                    If you live in an area where birch grows naturally, you can simply strip the bark yourself. Unlike other trees, birch sheds it s bark, and as long as you don t
                    Message 9 of 12 , Apr 18 10:15 AM
                    View Source
                    • 0 Attachment
                      If you live in an area where birch grows naturally, you can simply strip
                      the bark yourself. Unlike other trees, birch sheds it's bark, and as long
                      as you don't peel too much, you won't kill the tree.

                      Since I don't live in a birch-rich area, I bought mine from
                      http://birchbarkstore.com/ about 2 years ago. I was very satisfied with
                      them. I don't think they pre-treat their bark, but bark for letters
                      doesn't need much treatment anyway. The underside of the bark is typically
                      very smooth already, and can be written on easily. You can ask the store to
                      give you a piece with minimal knots, to ensure that most of the bark is
                      usable.

                      Lady Anya Sergeeva


                      On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 9:58 AM, Tim Nalley <mordakus@...> wrote:

                      > **
                      >
                      >
                      > Thank you! Does anyone have any sources of birch bark suitable for
                      > embossing with a stylus for purchase?
                      > 'dok
                      >
                      > From my Android phone on T-Mobile. The first nationwide 4G network.
                      >
                      >
                      > -------- Original message --------
                      > Subject: Re: [sig] Birch bark letters
                      > From: Anya Stickney <anyas5@...>
                      > To: sig@yahoogroups.com
                      > CC:
                      >
                      > "Drevnia Rus Byt i Kultura" has 1 page of pictures and 10 pages of
                      > descriptions about birch bark letters. Here are the highlights of the 1st
                      > paragraph ...
                      >
                      > 1. Preparation: After rubbing off the brittle bits from the inside, boil
                      > with alkalines to give the bark more elasticity. But there are many
                      > examples of reusing unworked bark as well.
                      >
                      > 2. Writing was done with a bone or metal stylus. (This is what Her Highness
                      > Ian'ka said). Out of 885 letters found, only 2 have ink. The styluses were
                      > used for both birch bark and tablets. The writing was done with the
                      > sharpened pointed end, and the wide flattened end was used to smooth out
                      > the written area to correct mistakes.
                      >
                      > Let me know if you'd like more info about the book.
                      >
                      > Lady Anya Sergeeva
                      >
                      > On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 8:50 AM, goldschp tds.net <goldschp@...>
                      > wrote:
                      >
                      > > **
                      >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > That was my understanding. They scratched the words. It matches the style
                      > > of the writing, which resembles carving.
                      > >
                      > > Paul
                      > >
                      > > On Apr 18, 2013 10:49 AM, "Joseph Belcher" <iegrappling@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > > **
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Thank you both.
                      > > > Are youe saying they were 'scratched' insead of wrote on, like a wax
                      > > > tablet is? No ink or other colorant was used?
                      > > >
                      > > > -Halbrust
                      > > >
                      > > > -----Original Message-----
                      > > > From: goldschp tds.net <goldschp@...>
                      > > > To: sig <sig@yahoogroups.com>
                      > > > Sent: Thu, Apr 18, 2013 8:21 am
                      > > > Subject: Re: [sig] Birch bark letters
                      > > >
                      > > > I've seen numerous depictions of the styli that have been dug up in
                      > > > ovgorod (that were used for birchbarks or for waxed tablets).
                      > Primarily,
                      > > > hey are made of metal, but that may just be because of what survives
                      > > being
                      > > > uried?
                      > > > Russian books tend to go immediately out of print after being
                      > published,
                      > > > ut it shouldn't be hard to find pictures. If it becomes too hard, let
                      > me
                      > > > now and I can mail you a scan.
                      > > > Paul Wickenden
                      > > >
                      > > > n Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Jennifer Nelson Kemp <
                      > > > lady.ianuk@...
                      > > > wrote:
                      > > > > You can write on birch bark with basically anything that will mark
                      > it.
                      > > > One
                      > > > thing that surprised my husband and I when we saw the actual
                      > > archeological
                      > > > objects is that the impressions on the bark were quite hard. We've used
                      > > > slightly sharpened antler and bone as well as the stylus's for wax
                      > > tablets
                      > > > to great effect. I'd have to read through Drevnia'a Rus and the
                      > Novgorod
                      > > > dig books to see if the they tell us where/what the stylii were used
                      > on.
                      > > >
                      > > > Ian'ka
                      > > >
                      > > > On Thu, Apr 18, 2013 at 7:57 AM, Joseph Belcher <iegrappling@...>
                      > > > wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > > **
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I�m doing research on the birch bark letters from Novgorod. There is
                      > a
                      > > > > decent amount of information available, but I have yet to find out
                      > what
                      > > > was
                      > > > > used to write with.
                      > > > > I haven�t read a single thing about ink analysis, charcoal remains,
                      > or
                      > > > > impressions from a stylus. Nothing.
                      > > > > Can someone point me towards the answer?
                      > > > >
                      > > > > -Halbrust
                      > > > >
                      > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > >
                      > > > ------------------------------------
                      > > >
                      > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > > >
                      > > > Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > >
                      > > > ------------------------------------
                      > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > > > Individual Email | Traditional
                      > > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      > > >
                      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • aldo
                      I published a few years ago an article which u can find in www.mondimedievali.net (Medioevo Russo) but... unfortunately in Italian! Aldo From: Joseph Belcher
                      Message 10 of 12 , Apr 18 2:37 PM
                      View Source
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I published a few years ago an article which u can find in www.mondimedievali.net (Medioevo Russo) but... unfortunately in Italian!

                        Aldo

                        From: Joseph Belcher
                        Sent: Thursday, April 18, 2013 4:57 PM
                        To: sig@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [sig] Birch bark letters



                        I’m doing research on the birch bark letters from Novgorod. There is a decent amount of information available, but I have yet to find out what was used to write with.
                        I haven’t read a single thing about ink analysis, charcoal remains, or impressions from a stylus. Nothing.
                        Can someone point me towards the answer?

                        -Halbrust

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Joseph Belcher
                        Thank you! We ll see how google translate does with it o) -Halbrust ... From: aldo To: sig Sent: Thu, Apr 18, 2013
                        Message 11 of 12 , Apr 18 3:06 PM
                        View Source
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Thank you! We'll see how google translate does with it 'o)

                          -Halbrust


                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: aldo <turanomar@...>
                          To: sig <sig@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Thu, Apr 18, 2013 2:43 pm
                          Subject: Re: [sig] Birch bark letters




                          I published a few years ago an article which u can find in www.mondimedievali.net (Medioevo Russo) but... unfortunately in Italian!

                          Aldo






                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • aldo
                          UN EVENTO MEDIEVALE EPOCALE DEL SECOLO SCORSO: La scoperta delle BERJOSTY Articolo dedicato ad un grande archeologo e storico russo contemporaneo: Valentin
                          Message 12 of 12 , Apr 19 11:35 AM
                          View Source
                          • 0 Attachment
                            UN EVENTO MEDIEVALE EPOCALE DEL SECOLO SCORSO:

                            La scoperta delle BERJOSTY



                            Articolo dedicato ad un grande archeologo e storico russo contemporaneo:

                            Valentin Lavrent’evic’ JANIN


                            Quando il prof. A. V. Arcihovskii trovò le prime berjòsty nei suoi scavi a Novgorod nell’estate (è l’unica stagione buona per il lavoro di scavo qui nel Grande Nord) del 1951 (26 luglio) probabilmente non ne rimase molto sorpreso poiché qui e là nelle zone archeologiche dove lavoravano gli altri colleghi delle università statali nell’ex URSS di tali reperti se ne trovavano ogni tanto. E’ vero che, quando lo scritto non era visibile o riconoscibile, gli archeologi li avevano presi per “galleggianti per la pesca”, ma ora il fatto eccezionale fu che con il proseguire degli scavi in pochi mesi di campagna il numero dei reperti salì a varie centinaia! Fino ad oggi (anno 2000) di berjòsty ne sono state catalogate circa un migliaio in questa zona di scavi, ma restano ca. 20.000 reperti simili da mettere ancora in ordine e da decifrare!

                            Che cosa sono le berjòsty (il singolare è berjòsta in russo)? E’ presto detto! Sono delle strisce oblunghe (da 25 cm fino a 40 cm e oltre) di scorza di betulla di larghezza tipica standard fra i 4 e gli 8 cm sulla cui faccia interna mediante uno stiletto appuntito d’osso o di metallo o di legno (pisàlo in russo) si incidono agevolmente le lettere. Le strisce, per essere così scritte, devono essere preparate immergendole o bollendole in acqua calda per dare loro una maggiore elasticità. A questo punto la striscia inverte la sua proprietà di avvolgersi su se stessa e lo scritto sulla berjòsta arrotolata risulterà ora sulla faccia esterna. Subito dopo l’incisione i solchi infatti imbruniscono e la scrittura è subito leggibile e, se poi le condizioni lo permettono, ecco che queste lettere sui generis riescono a conservarsi per secoli per essere scoperte poi dagli archeologi. Niente di eccezionale, a quanto pare e niente di nuovo come reperto, visto che se ne trovano non solo in Europa, ma anche in Nordamerica e abbastanza spesso persino nel nord dell’Asia. Si può aggiungere che tale tipo di supporto grafico è peculiare del nord ed è ben conosciuto dall’antichità fino ad oggi in tutto l’emisfero boreale dove cresce e vive la Betulla. Presente con varie decine di specie nelle foreste, quest’albero offre con la sua corteccia bianca e liscia che facilmente si stacca dal tronco un ottimo foglio per scrivere. Questa però è una nota di poco valore e quel che è invece importante per lo storico è il fatto che le berjòsty siano state trovate in così gran numero in città tutte vicine comprese nel grande territorio più settentrionale che una volta era parte dello stato della Rus’ di Kiev.

                            Ad esempio nella città di Rusa (riva sud del lago Ilmen, il lago immediatamente a sud di Novgorod) le berjòsty ritrovate sono 32, a Pskov (non lontano da Novgorod, ad occidente) 8, nell’area di Smolensk negli scavi della vicina Gnjòzdovo se ne sono trovate una decina, una risulta a Vitebsk nella città natale di Marc Chagall in Bielorussia e un’altra nella lontana Mosca. Fa perciò meraviglia che mai negli scavi fatti fino ad ora ne siano state trovate tante come a Novgorod!

                            Ci sorge spontanea la domanda: Qual è la ragione per spiegare tutti questi scritti in così gran numero in una sola città? La risposta non è semplice. Le berjòsty prodotte in un intervallo di tempo così ristretto (!) non possono che suggerirci una cosa: a Novgorod l’alfabetizzazione dei cittadini era molto diffusa (al contrario di quanto si credeva anni fa). Ciò vuol forse dire che le scuole delle chiese dei “cantoni” novgorodesi esistevano e funzionavano a pieno ritmo e che siano state alla portata di tutti, senza distinzione di classe o strato sociale? Malgrado ogni sforzo immaginativo, non esiste prova che l’istruzione venisse impartita in scuole organizzate né a Kiev e neppure nella colta Novgorod ed è anzi più probabile che solo le classi più abbienti si potessero permettere di far venire i monaci in casa per insegnare ai propri rampolli a leggere, a scrivere e a far di conto.

                            Che la scrittura subito dopo la sua antichissima invenzione dovesse diventare il mezzo di comunicazione di massa più diffuso fra gli uomini, nessuno se lo sarebbe aspettato in periodo medievale. Anzi! Dalle stesse fonti rappresentate dalle Vite dei Santi Russi (i primi santi russi furono di solito di famiglia principesca o nobile, con encomiabili eccezioni come il grande san Teodosio delle Grotte) si può dedurre che la Chiesa, com’è naturale, avesse il monopolio esclusivo dell’alfabetizzazione, sebbene l’istruzione passata dai Monasteri a colui che era destinato alla carriera ecclesiastica fosse tutt’altra di quella impartita ai “laici”. L’insegnamento della scrittura dunque veniva conservata gelosamente come attività riservata ai preti locali, custodi delle Sacre Scritture ossia dell’unica fonte delle conoscenze del tempo, affinché nessuno se ne appropriasse indebitamente (in altre parole per impiegarla in cerimonie pagane). Già è immaginabile nelle culture contadine europee appena evangelizzate la meraviglia che suscitava il sentire raccontare ad alta voce le stesse storie con le stesse ed eguali parole nelle nuove chiese soltanto scorrendo con il dito lungo questi strani segni misteriosi. Ciò era in contrasto con le esercitazioni mentali che invece occorreva fare per ricordare a memoria i fatti e gli eventi della propria famiglia e del proprio clan senza troppe variazioni di testo con le vecchie tecniche mnemoniche cantilenate del nord e così, quando il Cristianesimo penetrò e si affermò come religione dello stato nelle Terre Russe, tutti i bambini – con preferenza nelle città dei figli delle famiglie più abbienti – cominciarono a frequentare le chiese dove si insegnava, se non a scrivere, almeno a leggere e a cantare gli inni al nuovo dio cristiano. Le Cronache russe a questo proposito, parlando di Vladimiro il Santo quando introdusse il Cristianesimo a Kiev e a Novgorod, ci informano che mandò a studiare tutti i figli dei nobili affinché imparassero la nuova disciplina. Questa “imposizione dall’alto” fece tale impressione nelle famiglie che le madri piangevano e davano i loro figli per ormai morti, temendo che i ragazzi andassero ad imparare la magia nera, più che la conoscenza attraverso la scrittura.

                            D’altro canto è incontrovertibile che molte berjòsty siano di provenienza “popolare” e quindi dobbiamo ipotizzare che anche le classi più “basse” (almeno quelle novgorodesi) dovessero essere largamente alfabetizzate e questo ci dà un quadro di un’alta civiltà, eccezionale per il primo stato russo della storia. Dalle analisi fatte con le strumentazioni e i metodi d’indagine più moderni la maggioranza di questi scritti è databile intorno al XIII sec. d.C. ossia agli anni del grande successo internazionale di Novgorod-la-Grande. Conseguentemente dobbiamo vedere le berjòsty come un segno di questo fiorire della città, salvo poi a constatare che questo particolare supporto per lo scritto, proprio intorno al XIV, comincia a scomparire man mano sostituita dalla carta importata dall’occidente europeo e con le comunicazioni private che vanno cambiando.

                            A parte quanto detto sopra, l’importanza della scoperta delle berjòsty è una novità che finora è stata trascurata dalla storiografia occidentale. E’ vero che oggi Novgorod-la-Grande è un capoluogo di provincia nel grande nord russo a qualche centinaia di km da San Pietroburgo, di poca importanza economica e politica nell’odierna Federazione Russa, sebbene sia considerata la più brillante città-museo russa protetta dall’UNESCO. E’ vero che non è da confondersi con la molto più grande Novgorod-di-sotto ossia Nizhnii Novgorod sul Volga, ma è altrettanto vero che nel Medioevo il Grande Nord Russo rappresentò la più importante risorsa di materie prime e tecnologica per tutto il continente europeo e che il centro culturale e economico di questo immenso territorio da sfruttare era proprio Novgorod-la-Grande. Purtroppo nella storiografia occidentale, la limitatissima conoscenza di questa regione d’Europa (anche da parte dei contemporanei del lontano Medioevo) ha permesso che si diffondesse la concezione che da questo oscuro e lontano nord venissero solo materie prime di secondaria importanza. Questo modo di vedere però è ormai in disuso da quando gli scavi fatti a Novgorod hanno dato le prove lampanti che l’artigianato locale era di altissima qualità e che veniva esportato in tutto il mondo mediterraneo, se non anche più lontano. I traffici di questa città infatti giungevano fino in Cina attraverso le strade fluviali oltre il Caspio e con le carovane che lungo le vie meridionali asiatiche giungevano nell’India o attraverso quelle settentrionali toccavano la Mongolia. Novgorod tuttavia era collegata preferibilmente con tutto il nord d’Europa e con i mercati lungo il Reno e quando nacque l’Hansa, pur non diventando mai una città anseatica, fu la base di produzione più importante del Mare del Nord e del Baltico (un Kontoor).

                            Novgorod conserva bene ancora oggi il piano medievale del XV sec. insieme con i suoi vecchi monumenti, le tante chiese, ma… è solo una “brutta copia” di quella che fu la splendente città-repubblica a pianta circolare divisa dal fiume Volhov in due metà separate, chiamate rispettivamente: quella sulla riva destra, Riva del Mercato, e quella sulla sinistra, Riva di Santa Sofia. La Riva del Mercato – così chiamata perché aveva appunto una Piazza del Mercato – era in maggioranza abitata da artigiani e operai indipendenti, mentre quella opposta era abitata dall’élite e cioè dai bojari latifondisti e dal potentissimo Arcivescovo novgorodese. Le due “metà” erano unite dal cosiddetto Ponte Grande o Ponte Vecchio e ciascuna era circondata da una cinta di mura esterna con torri e bastioni per la difesa, al principio fatte di legno ma poi anche di mattoni. La Riva di Santa Sofia poi aveva al suo interno un’altra cinta di mura con fossato che racchiudeva la Cattedrale appunto dedicata a Santa Sofia e l’Arcivescovado con la sua sala detta delle Cento Colonne dove si riuniva quasi in segreto il governo ristretto della città (i Gospodà ossia i rappresentanti più potenti e autorevoli delle 300 famiglie bojàre più o meno imparentate fra di loro). Qui al tempo della fondazione della città nel IX sec. d.C. si trovava il grande Deposito di Merci chiamato Detìnez.

                            I cuori della città erano dunque la Cattedrale da una parte e la Piazza del Mercato dall’altra e Novgorod al momento del suo massimo splendore forse raggiunse i 60-70 mila abitanti e tutte queste persone… si scrivevano! Brevi note, contratti, sentenze giudiziarie, lamentele, soltanto saluti, addirittura anche i ragazzi che avevano appena imparato a scrivere hanno lasciato le loro berjòsty! E, meraviglia delle meraviglie, il primo documento scritto in lingua carelo-finnica è proprio il breve testo di una berjòsta (ricordiamo che la parte finnica della popolazione novgorodese era detta “ciuda” sebbene comprendesse varie etnie affini)!

                            L’interesse storico per questi documenti è dunque enorme…

                            Non possiamo qui tracciare la storia di Novgorod, ma abbiamo il dovere di metter in chiaro alcuni punti sul suo ruolo paneuropeo. La città aveva un regime assolutamente repubblicano e cioè si governava (al di là della partecipazione suppletiva a tale governo di un principe mandato da Kiev) attraverso la sua assemblea popolare chiamata Vece. Questa assemblea suprema si formava attraverso i deputati scelti nelle assemblee dei “cantoni” della città partecipate, queste sì, da tutti i residenti liberi e si riuniva davanti alla Chiesa di san Nicola sulla Riva del Mercato. Chi voleva poteva assistere plaudendo o gridando contro dall’esterno, a seconda dell’andamento della discussione. Questa organizzazione permise a Novgorod che i suoi traffici non dipendessero dai bisogni e dalle politiche della Rus’ di Kiev e dei suoi principi e perciò possiamo dire che le corti europee, sorte con l’affermazione politica dei Germani e degli Arabi, compravano di qui tutti quei prodotti forestali provenienti dal ricchissimo hinterland, prodotti che non erano ormai più disponibili in qualità e quantità in altri luoghi d’Europa. Di qui partivano tonnellate e tonnellate di cera bianchissima per illuminare il buio della notte nelle ricche case borghesi o nelle grandi cattedrali gotiche o per le tecniche del bronzo, il miele che addolciva tutte le tavole dei nobili, l’avorio delle zanne di tricheco, i preziosissimi schiavi giovani di cui persino il Palazzo del Laterano del Papa di Roma ne aveva in gran numero e, last but not least, le pellicce costosissime di zibellino, vaio, marmotta etc. con le quali i re, i cardinali, i nobili adornavano gli orli dei loro mantelli o dei loro abiti fatti di lino di Novgorod.

                            E non solo! Le sue ricchezze e il suo artigianato erano famosi per la loro squisita fattura. Non è, a nostro avviso, azzardato dire che gran parte dello sviluppo civile europeo durante il Medioevo dipese proprio dalle potenzialità di questa repubblica nordica e russa e dalle sue decisioni commerciali e politiche. Novgorod diventò talmente importante che persino il Papato si sforzò di tentarne la conquista. Infatti i Cavalieri Teutonici di stanza a Marienburg (oggi in Polonia) e i loro analoghi Livonici di stanza a Riga in Lettonia, quando si accorsero di essere capitati proprio nelle vicinanze delle forniture novgorodesi, tentarono in tutti i modi di conquistarla coinvolgendo i re danesi, svedesi e quelli della Polonia-Lituania contro la città. Anche i tataro-mongoli di Cinghiz Khan cercarono di sottometterla, ma tutti fallirono e la città, malgrado gli sforzi dei regni vicini ostili, restò una repubblica indipendente fino al 1478.

                            Le berjosty ci confermano tutto questo e ci suggeriscono un quadro della vita cittadina d’ogni giorno molto particolare.

                            Ci si alza con le prime luci dell’alba e ci si mette subito a lavorare. Le donne sono affaccendate con i servizi soliti di casa o con la tessitura e il ricamo e gli uomini con legno argento pelli etc. si danno da fare per tirar fuori oggetti e suppellettili di squisita fattura che talvolta richiedono persino settimane di duro lavoro. Il bojaro padrone e signore di tutta questa gente invece, dopo aver fatto un giro nell’usad’ba per controllare a che punto sono le ordinazioni che ha passato ai suoi uomini, va presto a pregare e a consigliarsi col suo pope nella chiesa da lui costruita e che serve non solo come luogo di preghiera, ma anche come futura tomba e come cassaforte per le cose più preziose. Successivamente incontrerà alla Riva del Mercato i suoi clienti stranieri per accordarsi su prezzi e consegne oppure, attaccati i cavallini alla slitta, si farà portare nei suoi terreni fuori città per controllare come stanno andando le raccolte e le coltivazioni. Ad una certa ora del giorno ci sarà una refezione nell’usad’ba, tutti insieme, e poi una siesta pomeridiana. Il lavoro però deve riprendere al più presto anche perché d’inverno il giorno è molto corto alle latitudini di Novgorod e il bojaro non gradisce che si consumino candele per illuminare il lavoro perché la cera pulita e filtrata si vende a prezzi altissimi in Europa ed è inutile consumarla in casa, salvo che non ci sia una festa o una cerimonia particolare!

                            Purtroppo la città costruita immediatamente all’uscita del Volhov dal lago Ilmen (è l’unico emissario) doveva subire i capricci del clima e quando il lago gelava per molto tempo ecco che a primavera tutto il ghiaccio sciogliendosi causava delle inondazioni devastanti. Tuttavia dobbiamo entrare nella mentalità della gente del tempo che ancora serbava le credenze e le superstizioni del vecchio paganesimo slavo per capire che le inondazioni erano considerate come una mattana causata dalle ire del Signore del Lago contro i novgorodesi che certamente avevano trasgredito in qualche modo alle regole di reverenza che si dovevano agli dèi più potenti. Dunque le inondazioni (periodiche o quasi) una volta scatenatesi, si attendeva che fluissero via e, malgrado le devastazioni e le vittime, si tornava alle vecchie case. Non si liberava tutto dal fango argilloso poiché si credeva che gli oggetti ormai inghiottiti erano ritornati alla dea Madre Umida Terra che dapprima li aveva donato agli uomini ed ora se li era ripresi. Si procedeva quindi, ove necessario, ad una nuova ricopertura delle strade con tronchi di legno nel modo speciale che solo gli Slavi sapevano fare e la vita riprendeva. Altra tragedia era il fuoco e anche qui entrava la visione religioso-magica del mondo, quando il fuoco distruggeva mezza città. Certo! La città godeva di tutti i servizi più moderni del tempo come ospedali ed altro, ma per gli incendi era stato perfino istituito un servizio di prevenzione per ogni cantone. E tuttavia quando le fiamme avvolgevano le case nessuno andava a spegnerle perché il Fuoco era ancora sentito come il dio pagano sacro e potente e purificante e nessuno avrebbe mai osato offenderlo versandogli acqua addosso.

                            Ecco questi forse sono i motivi perché le berjòsty si sono conservate nel fango senza essere mai state recuperate dagli stessi contemporanei per servire ancora come archivio personale o famigliare!

                            Certamente presso i complessi industriali (le usad’by) dei bojari novgorodesi si nota una concentrazione degli scritti su corteccia di betulla più che presso le officine artigianali “dei liberi”. Molte di esse definiscono un impegno scritto quasi che, per paura di essere fraintesi, sia indispensabile fissare tutto sullo scritto. Ciò risponde al tipico atteggiamento “capitalistico” novgorodese nei confronti della ricchezza e del suo uso immediato e pratico verso chi ricco non è e cioè: Non c’è bisogno di saper far tutto, ma basta solo avere il denaro per “noleggiare” chi sa fare quello che noi non sappiamo fare. Questo è l’uso utilitaristico dello scritto che riusciamo subito a riconoscere.

                            Se poi ci chiediamo come mai ci fosse questo fitto scambio di “SMS ante litteram” in quel lontano periodo, una risposta esauriente non c’è poiché il tenore degli scritti è vario non essendo questi sempre dei documenti ufficiali, ma scritture prevalentemente private. In generale le lettere provengono da tutti gli strati della società novgorodese e, come abbiamo già detto, parlano di tantissime cose e vicende, dalle più banali alle più importanti per la vita privata e pubblica dei cittadini di quel tempo in quell’angolo lontano e importante d’Europa. Perciò per la storia di Novgorod medievale oggi è l’inverso: Con una certa ampiezza possiamo da queste lettere capire il perché e il come di questa città, della sua esistenza e del suo fiorire… entrando in casa della sua gente fin nei loro cuori!

                            E’ logico anche, sebbene libri mastri o registri non ne siano stati ancora trovati, che in una città che aveva un giro d’affari enorme durante tutto l’anno sorgesse la necessità di tenere i conti, di fare gli elenchi delle cose da vendere e da comprare, dei pagamenti, dei contatti da prendere e da mantenere etc. Il lavoro era infatti organizzato attraverso le commesse che i bojari passavano agli artigiani. Costoro però erano parte dell’usad’ba bojara e cioè del complesso abitativo e produttivo di ogni famiglia bojara. Qui gli artigiani con famiglia e aiutanti abitavano e venivano mantenuti vita natural durante legati al loro “padrone” proprio dal lavoro che svolgevano. Altri, ma numerosi, artigiani però erano liberi sia perché il loro lavoro era troppo difficile e specializzato o sporco o ingombrante, sia perché erano riusciti ad emanciparsi dalla dipendenza da una famiglia bojara per vari motivi e dunque avevano piccole case-officina proprie in varie vie della città. Questa situazione implicava dunque una specie di segregazione per i lavoranti artigiani delle usad’by dal resto della vita della città che però probabilmente subiva un’interruzione quando giungeva la bella stagione e si poteva andare al seguito dei padroni nelle sconfinate proprietà terriere dell’entroterra novgorodese per aiutare a raccogliere prodotti della foresta o attendere ad altri lavori agricoli (limitatissimi a causa del clima), l’estrazione del sale dall’acqua salata o per seccare il pesce o per abbattere alberi e controllare le trappole per gli animali da pelliccia etc.

                            L’importanza per lo storico nella lettura delle berjòsty però è pure un’altra e consiste nel fatto che, quando si raccontano degli eventi del passato, ci si imbatte nell’impossibilità e nell’incertezza di interpretare quegli eventi nel modo giusto se non si conoscono bene le intenzioni, l’indole, l’atteggiamento e le aspettative dei protagonisti. La storia medievale che noi raccontiamo oggi purtroppo è la storia di coloro che stavano in cima alla scala sociale e di coloro che li sostentavano con lavoro, forniture e aiuti materiali al contrario sappiamo pochissimo. Come costoro vivessero dobbiamo dedurlo invece, sempre con un ampio grado d’incertezza e in modo obliquo e indiretto, estrapolando dai documenti scritti per le élites al potere di cui disponiamo e perciò dare un giudizio netto sul patto sociale esistente fra le classi presenti nella repubblica che possa essere tratto dai contenuti delle berjòsty non è consigliabile e dobbiamo accontentarci di congetture, domandandoci tutt’al più perché mai esistesse questa forte spinta a scrivere sulle cose più disparate invece di parlarne a casa o al mercato.

                            Si possono considerare queste lettere come una parte della letteratura russa? Forse sì, almeno dal punto di vista filologico per la ricostruzione della lingua grande russa di cui il novgorodese è un dialetto settentrionale, ma a parte la tradizione delle byline (racconti popolari di imprese passate) locali, non abbiamo prove di altra grande produzione letteraria, salvo quella ecclesiastica delle Cronache novgorodesi e delle traduzioni di scritti “edificanti” (su imitazione greco-bizantina) prodotte nei monasteri locali con grande dovizia, al contrario di altri centri russi contemporanei.

                            Anzi, dobbiamo aggiungere per onor di cronaca che, se fino a qualche anno fa si è considerato il Vangelo di Ostromir scritto in paleo-bulgaro o slavone ecclesiastico il più antico documento scritto in questa lingua antenata del russo e del bulgaro moderni, con la scoperta del 13 luglio del 2000 di un paio di pagine dei Salmi scritti su un cosiddetto trittico tavolette incerate di legno (chiamate cery in russo, da scrivere con lo stiletto). Queste all’analisi dendrocronologica risultano risalire fra la fine del X e i primi anni del XI sec. d.C. 50 anni prima dunque del Vangelo sopradetto!

                            E vediamo di dare un’antologia di qualcuna fra le più curiose (già tradotte e adattate da noi).



                            N° 46 – Non-so l’ha scritto, Non-penso l’ha fatto vedere, e chi l’ha letto…

                            In questa b. quasi certamente si accusa qualcuno di aver scritto cose incomprensibili.



                            N° 199 – Sono un animale selvaggio. / Saluti da Onfim a Danilo.

                            In questa b. scrive un bambino a nome Onfim (Eutimio?) che va ancora a scuola poiché vi ha ricopiato l’alfabeto e poi ha disegnato con tratti infantili se stesso a cavallo.



                            N° 3 – Tante buone parole (saluti) da Josif (Giuseppe) al fratello Fomà (Tommaso). Non dimenticare di tener d’occhio Lev (Leone) per la segala. Glielo ha già detto Rodivan Podinoghin. Per il resto tutto bene. Tu però ricordati (della segala).

                            E’ un avviso abbastanza preoccupato affinché la segale sia mietuta e non vada a male, dato il clima rigido di Novgorod!



                            N° 64 – Saluti da Horitanija a Sofija. Che ne è stato delle mie tre misure di panno a Mihail? Dovrebbe averle consegnate! Anzi! Signora, la incarico di dirgli che deve anche consegnare il pesce sia quello fresco che quello salato. Ti bacio.

                            Ecco come si vede anche le donne erano occupate con servitori troppo lenti o oziosi.



                            N° 439 – Da … a Spirko. Se Matei (Matteo) non è venuto ritirare la grossa misura di cera, allora mandamela con Prus. Ho già venduto il piombo e lo stagno e i lavori di metallo. Non dovrò più recarmi a Suzdal (nel sud). Tre grosse misure di cera sono state comprate. Dovresti venire tu qui. Portami perciò 4 misure piccole di stagno e due di rame in foglia e paga tutto pronta cassa.

                            Questi sono veri e propri ordini di compravendita!



                            N° 2 – Saluti da Pjotr (Pietro ) a Marija (Maria). Il prato l’ho rasato, ma gli uomini da Ozery mi ha portato via il fieno. Ti prego di farmi una copia scritta del contratto e di mandarmela qui. Se poi la spedisci altrove, fammi sapere dove.

                            Ci sono problemi!!!



                            N° 154 (danneggiata) – Da Nosko a Mestjata. Il tipo venuta dall’altra sponda del lago (Ilmen?) e Hodutinic’ di Suzdal l’anno scorso hanno rifatto il tetto. Prenditi 2 grivne per nostro conto.

                            Estinguiamo i debiti e le pendenze!



                            N° 163 – Saluti da Demjan (Damiano) a D… Vendi pure il cavallo per il prezzo migliore che riesci a spuntare. Ricordati però di tener in conto che quello che perdi è sotto tua responsabilità. Intanto dì a Kuseko di non perdere le kune (il denaro). E’ inaffidabile.

                            Si vede che la vendita è stata fatta fuori tempo e bisogna correre ai ripari!



                            N° 246 – Da Scirovit a Stojan. Da quando ti sei preso da me la croce e non mi hai mandato il corrispettivo in denaro sono già passati 9 anni. Se non mi mandi le 4 grivne e mezza che mi devo, ti farò proclamare il migliore dei novgorodesi. Perciò mandami il denaro senza rancore.

                            Si coglie l’ironia?



                            N° 235 – Da Sudiscia a Nascir. Sciadok mi ha mandato due agenti esecutori e questi mi hanno saccheggiato la casa per il debito del fratello…

                            Ecco che anche qui si procede ad esecuzioni forzate!



                            N° 415 – Saluti da Fovronija a Felice e con tante lacrime. Il mio figliastro me le ha date di santa ragione e poi mi ha cacciato dalla casa di campagna. Mi raccomandi di andare in città? O vieni tu stesso qui? Sono davvero in fin di vita!

                            Succede anche questo!



                            N° 749 – Saluti da Ivan (Giovanni) a Lentija. Quello che io detto davanti a voi è vero e ti puoi fidare. Sei mio fratello, che ti serve ancora? Quel che succederà, non deve darti timori, ci sono qua io per te. Per ilo resto della mia vita mi preoccuperò sempre del tuo stare bene.

                            Ecco un esempio di vero affetto!



                            N° 377 – Da Mikita (Niceta) a Uljaniza (Giulietta). Vieni da me. Io ti voglio e tu anche. E anche Ignazio lo sa.

                            E’ un appuntamento amoroso?



                            N° 10 – C’è un castello fra cielo e terra e qui arrivò un messaggero senza strada e portò con sé per voi una notizia non scritta.

                            E’ un indovinello. Chi lo risolve? Comunque: il castello è l’Arca di Noè, il messaggero è la Colomba e la notizia non scritta è il ramo d’olivo!



                            N° 43 – Da Boris a Nastasija. Quando riceverai questa lettera, mandami subito qualcuno con il cavallo perché io qui ho molto da fare. E mandami la biancheria intima perché io ho dimenticato di portarla con me.

                            Un marito un po’ svagato!|



                            N° 538 – Richiesta della moglie del pope al pope stesso. Quello che ti è successo e arrivato fino a Onani. E adesso Kirjak lo va dicendo a tutti in giro. Preoccupati dunque!

                            Quale sacrilegio avrà mai compiuto questo prete?










                            Berjòsta: sopra come appare svolta e sotto il negativo della scritta



                            © 2007 di Aldo C. Marturano





                            Bibliografia selezionata:



                            S. Franklin – Writing, Society and Culture in Early Rus, c. 950-1300, Cambridge 2002

                            C. Goehrke – Russischer Alltag, die Vormoderne, Zürich 2003

                            V. L. Janin – Srednevekovyi Novgorod, Moskvà 2004

                            A.C. Marturano – E’ caduta la Repubblica, Melegnano 2005

                            J. S. Rjabzev – Hrestomatija po Istorii Russkoi Kul’tury, XI-XVV vv., Moskvà 1998


                            Un’usad’ba novgorodese di piccole dimensioni




                            From: Joseph Belcher
                            Sent: Friday, April 19, 2013 12:06 AM
                            To: sig@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [sig] Birch bark letters



                            Thank you! We'll see how google translate does with it 'o)

                            -Halbrust

                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: aldo <mailto:turanomar%40libero.it>
                            To: sig <mailto:sig%40yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Thu, Apr 18, 2013 2:43 pm
                            Subject: Re: [sig] Birch bark letters

                            I published a few years ago an article which u can find in www.mondimedievali.net (Medioevo Russo) but... unfortunately in Italian!

                            Aldo

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.