Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [sig] Help whit embroidery

Expand Messages
  • Joseph Belcher
    I m sorry I can t help much, but I m very interested in what others have to day. What little I do know is that the embroidery often was to keep the spirits
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 24, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm sorry I can't help much, but I'm very interested in what others have to day.
      What little I do know is that the embroidery often was to keep the spirits from entering your clothes. Maybe that reason plays in to the motifs somehow.

      -Halbrust

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Anya Stickney <anyas5@...>
      To: sig <sig@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tue, Oct 23, 2012 5:44 pm
      Subject: [sig] Help whit embroidery




      Greetings fellow Russ-o-files,

      I'm interested in making an outfit consisting of a navershnik and a
      rubakha from 10th-12th c . The navershnik (light outerwear) that I'd
      like to make is heavily embroidered at the bottom trim and vertically
      down the front (a kajma I think). But the more research I do, the
      more I am perplexed about the combination of the outer garment
      (navershnik) and the under layer (rubakha). From what I've read and
      the extant pieces that I've seen, the rubakha is typically heavily
      embroidered at the trim with a geometric (mostly counted) stitch that
      I've seen described as Russian scarlet work. But the navershnic
      embroidery is typically very floral, flowy, and non-geometrical. It
      seems to me that if worn together, the styles would clash
      considerably. Since a lot of Russian clothes seemed to emphasize
      harmony and matching of styles, I don't see how one could wear a
      rubakha with a heavily geometric pattern and a navershnik (and the
      rest of the outer layer embroidery) in a flowy pattern.
      Has anyone encountered this before, and how did you reconcile this? Or
      am I over thinking this?

      Thanks in advance!
      Anya






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Sheila Horon
      I am not an expert on Rus embroidery, but two things come to mind. Are the rubakha an navershnik that you are looking at from the same period and from the same
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 30, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        I am not an expert on Rus embroidery, but two things come to mind. Are the rubakha an navershnik that you are looking at from the same period and from the same area? The earliest designs tended to be more geometric and gradually evolved into the more organic. Different areas of Russia also had their own styles of embroidery. Slava
        To: sig@yahoogroups.com
        From: iegrappling@...
        Date: Wed, 24 Oct 2012 11:04:58 -0400
        Subject: Re: [sig] Help whit embroidery




























        I'm sorry I can't help much, but I'm very interested in what others have to day.

        What little I do know is that the embroidery often was to keep the spirits from entering your clothes. Maybe that reason plays in to the motifs somehow.



        -Halbrust



        -----Original Message-----

        From: Anya Stickney <anyas5@...>

        To: sig <sig@yahoogroups.com>

        Sent: Tue, Oct 23, 2012 5:44 pm

        Subject: [sig] Help whit embroidery



        Greetings fellow Russ-o-files,



        I'm interested in making an outfit consisting of a navershnik and a

        rubakha from 10th-12th c . The navershnik (light outerwear) that I'd

        like to make is heavily embroidered at the bottom trim and vertically

        down the front (a kajma I think). But the more research I do, the

        more I am perplexed about the combination of the outer garment

        (navershnik) and the under layer (rubakha). From what I've read and

        the extant pieces that I've seen, the rubakha is typically heavily

        embroidered at the trim with a geometric (mostly counted) stitch that

        I've seen described as Russian scarlet work. But the navershnic

        embroidery is typically very floral, flowy, and non-geometrical. It

        seems to me that if worn together, the styles would clash

        considerably. Since a lot of Russian clothes seemed to emphasize

        harmony and matching of styles, I don't see how one could wear a

        rubakha with a heavily geometric pattern and a navershnik (and the

        rest of the outer layer embroidery) in a flowy pattern.

        Has anyone encountered this before, and how did you reconcile this? Or

        am I over thinking this?



        Thanks in advance!

        Anya



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Anya Stickney
        I think my problem was that I was assuming that XIX c. embroidery was representative of XI c. embroidery. I ve read this in several Russian folk embroidery
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 30, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          I think my problem was that I was assuming that XIX c. embroidery was
          representative of XI c. embroidery. I've read this in several Russian
          folk embroidery books, and was very confused by the discontinuity I
          was seeing between modern embroidery and period surviving folk art
          (wood cuts, ceramics, leather, etc.). I was expecting to find
          very-detailed geometrical designs, but that is not what I was seeing.
          But a few days ago I found this article (reprinted here
          http://www.perunica.ru/tradicii/1171-o-simvolike-russkoj-krestyanskoj-vyshivki.html)
          (in Russian) that says that embroidery is an ever-changing thing.
          Certain motifs may remain, but techniques, stitches, attention to
          certain details, all change with time. Once I realized this,
          everything made a lot more sense. Modern embroidery can be used for
          clues as to what motifs period embroidery had, but it cannot be seen
          as representative of period embroidery.

          Anya


          On Tue, Oct 30, 2012 at 5:05 PM, Sheila Horon <sshoron@...> wrote:
          >
          > I am not an expert on Rus embroidery, but two things come to mind. Are the rubakha an navershnik that you are looking at from the same period and from the same area? The earliest designs tended to be more geometric and gradually evolved into the more organic. Different areas of Russia also had their own styles of embroidery. Slava
          > To: sig@yahoogroups.com
          > From: iegrappling@...
          > Date: Wed, 24 Oct 2012 11:04:58 -0400
          > Subject: Re: [sig] Help whit embroidery
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > I'm sorry I can't help much, but I'm very interested in what others have to day.
          >
          > What little I do know is that the embroidery often was to keep the spirits from entering your clothes. Maybe that reason plays in to the motifs somehow.
          >
          >
          >
          > -Halbrust
          >
          >
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          >
          > From: Anya Stickney <anyas5@...>
          >
          > To: sig <sig@yahoogroups.com>
          >
          > Sent: Tue, Oct 23, 2012 5:44 pm
          >
          > Subject: [sig] Help whit embroidery
          >
          >
          >
          > Greetings fellow Russ-o-files,
          >
          >
          >
          > I'm interested in making an outfit consisting of a navershnik and a
          >
          > rubakha from 10th-12th c . The navershnik (light outerwear) that I'd
          >
          > like to make is heavily embroidered at the bottom trim and vertically
          >
          > down the front (a kajma I think). But the more research I do, the
          >
          > more I am perplexed about the combination of the outer garment
          >
          > (navershnik) and the under layer (rubakha). From what I've read and
          >
          > the extant pieces that I've seen, the rubakha is typically heavily
          >
          > embroidered at the trim with a geometric (mostly counted) stitch that
          >
          > I've seen described as Russian scarlet work. But the navershnic
          >
          > embroidery is typically very floral, flowy, and non-geometrical. It
          >
          > seems to me that if worn together, the styles would clash
          >
          > considerably. Since a lot of Russian clothes seemed to emphasize
          >
          > harmony and matching of styles, I don't see how one could wear a
          >
          > rubakha with a heavily geometric pattern and a navershnik (and the
          >
          > rest of the outer layer embroidery) in a flowy pattern.
          >
          > Has anyone encountered this before, and how did you reconcile this? Or
          >
          > am I over thinking this?
          >
          >
          >
          > Thanks in advance!
          >
          > Anya
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • Tatiana
          Awesome article, thank you for sharing Tatiana
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 31, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Awesome article, thank you for sharing
            Tatiana

            --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, Anya Stickney <anyas5@...> wrote:

            > But a few days ago I found this article (reprinted here
            > http://www.perunica.ru/tradicii/1171-o-simvolike-russkoj-krestyanskoj-vyshivki.html)
            > Anya
            >
          • dok
            Argh! My primary internet is my droid. Did anyone notîce if there was a translatîon ôption embedded? Thanks! dok
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 31, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              Argh! My primary internet is my droid. Did anyone notîce if there was a translatîon ôption embedded?
              Thanks!
              'dok
              --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, "Tatiana" <littlegreensardine@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Awesome article, thank you for sharing
              > Tatiana
              >
              > --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, Anya Stickney <anyas5@> wrote:
              >
              > > But a few days ago I found this article (reprinted here
              > > http://www.perunica.ru/tradicii/1171-o-simvolike-russkoj-krestyanskoj-vyshivki.html)
              > > Anya
              > >
              >
            • Anya Stickney
              No, I think it s primarily in Russian. But Google does a decent job translating it. Anya ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 31, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                No, I think it's primarily in Russian. But Google does a decent job
                translating it.

                Anya


                On Wed, Oct 31, 2012 at 6:27 AM, dok <mordakus@...> wrote:

                > **
                >
                >
                > Argh! My primary internet is my droid. Did anyone not�ce if there was a
                > translat�on �ption embedded?
                > Thanks!
                > 'dok
                >
                > --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, "Tatiana" <littlegreensardine@...> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > Awesome article, thank you for sharing
                > > Tatiana
                > >
                > > --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, Anya Stickney <anyas5@> wrote:
                > >
                > > > But a few days ago I found this article (reprinted here
                > > >
                > http://www.perunica.ru/tradicii/1171-o-simvolike-russkoj-krestyanskoj-vyshivki.html
                > )
                > > > Anya
                > > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.