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Re: [sig] Re: Czech name help

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  • Mary Stoughton
    I heard my Grandfather Americanized the pronounciation of Makovička. From Mauk-o-vichka to Mak-o-vicka. His friends called him Mak. There are so many
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 26, 2012
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      I heard my Grandfather Americanized the pronounciation of Makovička. From
      Mauk-o-vichka to Mak-o-vicka. His friends called him Mak. There are so
      many Makovickas in the Czech Republic, I dont think he changed the
      spelling.

      That aside, from what you are saying Janis, the root of my Grandfathers
      name is Makovi? Then the Ka is added as an endearment or familiarity?

      Libuše/Mary

      On Tue, Sep 25, 2012 at 6:11 PM, John Staeck <avarjanos@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > In Czech and other languages throughout the region, the use of a
      > diminutive is sometimes added as a form of personalization. The "KA"
      > ending is one such form in Czech, as can be KO. An example would be Jiri
      > (George) becoming Jirko, or a different Czech system changes Pavel to
      > Paveli. It is unclear if there is some form of diminutive at work over
      > the years or not here, I do not pretend to be an expert. It is something
      > to watch out for, though.
      >
      > Pax - Janos/John aka (to his grandparents) as Janci (Yan-chee) (which is
      > one such diminutive in Hungarian)
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Quokkaqueen <quokkaqueen@...>
      > To: sig@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tuesday, September 25, 2012 5:05 PM
      > Subject: [sig] Re: Czech name help
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi Libusa and everyone else!
      >
      > <<snip>>
      > > > The closest dated form I can see, to Libusa is "Mach", in 1052. So
      > possibly
      > > > Machovicha? But that is still 382 years apart. SENA wants elements to
      > be
      > > > 300 years apart.
      > <<snip>>
      >
      > SENA is the abbreviation for the rules the SCA college of heralds use. The
      > reason why I'm obsessing over 300 years is because although <Libusa> shows
      > up in a Russian source, it is referring to a semi-legendary Czech princess.
      > So while you can combine Czech and Russian under SENA,there can only be 300
      > years difference between them.
      >
      > <<snip>>
      > > > Are you combining the early Mach with -ovicha? Is that a common
      > practice in
      > > > the SCA?? I would rather go with a change in spelling, then a change in
      > > > pronounciation. Machovicha is very close to Makovička..as the čka...is
      >
      > > > actually pronounced "ch-ka".
      > <<snip>>
      >
      > As far as I am aware, Czech names are gender dependant. Makovic^ka isn't
      > formed correctly for the modern language, at least. It probably should be
      > Makovic^kova/, where the a/ is an a-acute. So you may need to change
      > pronunciation anyway.
      > The tricky thing, is that you either are going to need to find dated
      > instances of both parts of the name in a Czech/Bohemian context, as well as
      > figure out how to form the byname correctly.
      >
      > <<snip>>
      > > > I could not find:
      > > >
      > > > *(Nikola Makovich Dragovich). 1454. [Mor 117] "* in Pauls Russian
      > > > Dictionary.
      > <<snip>>
      >
      > Under <Mak>, here: http://heraldry.sca.org/paul/ma.html
      >
      > Good luck!
      >
      > ffride
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


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