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Need help with a name meaning

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  • Maryelizabeth
    Greetings! At Pennsic, my son had his name submitted and it was not done exactly right. We are hoping to find the meaning of the surname submitted for him. The
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 13, 2012
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      Greetings!

      At Pennsic, my son had his name submitted and it was not done exactly right. We are hoping to find the meaning of the surname submitted for him.

      The name in question is Zhiteslav. On the heraldry database it only gives a variation of the spelling: Zyteslav.

      He is a bit unhappy with Dmitrii being submitted as Dimitrii, but I think we can overlook that if the meaning to the surname is acceptable to him.

      Thank you for any help with this. I have been unable to get help from other heralds on this. The original name he wanted was Dmitrii Zaitsev, which in period would have been spelled Zaitsov - wires definitely got crossed somewhere when he tried to explain what he wanted.

      Apollonia
    • Anya Stickney
      Here s my understanding from modern Russian... Zhiteslav/Zyteslav consists of Zhyt , which means to live, and Slav which would mean good/happy. So I would
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 13, 2012
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        Here's my understanding from modern Russian...

        Zhiteslav/Zyteslav consists of "Zhyt", which means to live, and "Slav"
        which would mean good/happy. So I would understand Zhiteslav to mean
        living good, "bon vivont", or something along those lines.

        (Also, "Zhyt" is a modern slang for a person of Jewish decent. But I don't
        know if this was the case in period.)

        Zaitsev has the root "Zaits", which means rabbit.

        Dmitrii and Dimitrii are the same name, and considering that in Russia one
        person can go by many names (Dimitrii, Dmitrii, Dima, Mitya are all one
        same name), I think that what you passed was the formal name. But you can
        go by any of the alternatives, and be completely accurate. But I
        understand wanting it to be spelled a certain way since in the US people
        usually go by only one name.

        As an asside, in Russian, I can go by Anna, Anya, Anechka, Anushka, An'ka,
        Annya, and all of them valid.

        Hope it helps,
        Anya


        On Thu, Sep 13, 2012 at 8:30 AM, Maryelizabeth <peterbenma@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > Greetings!
        >
        > At Pennsic, my son had his name submitted and it was not done exactly
        > right. We are hoping to find the meaning of the surname submitted for him.
        >
        > The name in question is Zhiteslav. On the heraldry database it only gives
        > a variation of the spelling: Zyteslav.
        >
        > He is a bit unhappy with Dmitrii being submitted as Dimitrii, but I think
        > we can overlook that if the meaning to the surname is acceptable to him.
        >
        > Thank you for any help with this. I have been unable to get help from
        > other heralds on this. The original name he wanted was Dmitrii Zaitsev,
        > which in period would have been spelled Zaitsov - wires definitely got
        > crossed somewhere when he tried to explain what he wanted.
        >
        > Apollonia
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • goldschp tds.net
        Also, bear in mind that there is no difference between Zaitsev and Zaitsov. Paul ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 13, 2012
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          Also, bear in mind that there is no difference between Zaitsev and Zaitsov.

          Paul
          On Sep 13, 2012 12:23 PM, "Anya Stickney" <anyas5@...> wrote:

          > Here's my understanding from modern Russian...
          >
          > Zhiteslav/Zyteslav consists of "Zhyt", which means to live, and "Slav"
          > which would mean good/happy. So I would understand Zhiteslav to mean
          > living good, "bon vivont", or something along those lines.
          >
          > (Also, "Zhyt" is a modern slang for a person of Jewish decent. But I don't
          > know if this was the case in period.)
          >
          > Zaitsev has the root "Zaits", which means rabbit.
          >
          > Dmitrii and Dimitrii are the same name, and considering that in Russia one
          > person can go by many names (Dimitrii, Dmitrii, Dima, Mitya are all one
          > same name), I think that what you passed was the formal name. But you can
          > go by any of the alternatives, and be completely accurate. But I
          > understand wanting it to be spelled a certain way since in the US people
          > usually go by only one name.
          >
          > As an asside, in Russian, I can go by Anna, Anya, Anechka, Anushka, An'ka,
          > Annya, and all of them valid.
          >
          > Hope it helps,
          > Anya
          >
          >
          > On Thu, Sep 13, 2012 at 8:30 AM, Maryelizabeth <peterbenma@...>
          > wrote:
          >
          > > **
          > >
          > >
          > > Greetings!
          > >
          > > At Pennsic, my son had his name submitted and it was not done exactly
          > > right. We are hoping to find the meaning of the surname submitted for
          > him.
          > >
          > > The name in question is Zhiteslav. On the heraldry database it only gives
          > > a variation of the spelling: Zyteslav.
          > >
          > > He is a bit unhappy with Dmitrii being submitted as Dimitrii, but I think
          > > we can overlook that if the meaning to the surname is acceptable to him.
          > >
          > > Thank you for any help with this. I have been unable to get help from
          > > other heralds on this. The original name he wanted was Dmitrii Zaitsev,
          > > which in period would have been spelled Zaitsov - wires definitely got
          > > crossed somewhere when he tried to explain what he wanted.
          > >
          > > Apollonia
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • aldo
          You are right just in what you put within brackets. In fact ZHITESLAV is a corruption of ZHIDESLAV and I registered it the the Novgorod Chronicles. Ciao Aldo
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 13, 2012
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            You are right just in what you put within brackets. In fact ZHITESLAV is a
            corruption of ZHIDESLAV and I registered it the the Novgorod Chronicles.
            Ciao
            Aldo

            -----Messaggio originale-----
            From: Anya Stickney
            Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2012 6:23 PM
            To: sig@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [sig] Need help with a name meaning

            Here's my understanding from modern Russian...

            Zhiteslav/Zyteslav consists of "Zhyt", which means to live, and "Slav"
            which would mean good/happy. So I would understand Zhiteslav to mean
            living good, "bon vivont", or something along those lines.

            (Also, "Zhyt" is a modern slang for a person of Jewish decent. But I don't
            know if this was the case in period.)

            Zaitsev has the root "Zaits", which means rabbit.

            Dmitrii and Dimitrii are the same name, and considering that in Russia one
            person can go by many names (Dimitrii, Dmitrii, Dima, Mitya are all one
            same name), I think that what you passed was the formal name. But you can
            go by any of the alternatives, and be completely accurate. But I
            understand wanting it to be spelled a certain way since in the US people
            usually go by only one name.

            As an asside, in Russian, I can go by Anna, Anya, Anechka, Anushka, An'ka,
            Annya, and all of them valid.

            Hope it helps,
            Anya


            On Thu, Sep 13, 2012 at 8:30 AM, Maryelizabeth <peterbenma@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > Greetings!
            >
            > At Pennsic, my son had his name submitted and it was not done exactly
            > right. We are hoping to find the meaning of the surname submitted for him.
            >
            > The name in question is Zhiteslav. On the heraldry database it only gives
            > a variation of the spelling: Zyteslav.
            >
            > He is a bit unhappy with Dmitrii being submitted as Dimitrii, but I think
            > we can overlook that if the meaning to the surname is acceptable to him.
            >
            > Thank you for any help with this. I have been unable to get help from
            > other heralds on this. The original name he wanted was Dmitrii Zaitsev,
            > which in period would have been spelled Zaitsov - wires definitely got
            > crossed somewhere when he tried to explain what he wanted.
            >
            > Apollonia
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            ------------------------------------

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