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White velvet clothing

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  • Soraya Newell
    Didn t a 16th C. visitor (von Herberstein, maybe) write about a lavish dinner, where the plates were gold and the Tsar was served by men in white velvet?
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 8, 2012
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      Didn't a 16th C. visitor (von Herberstein, maybe) write about a lavish dinner, where the plates were gold and the Tsar was served by men in white velvet?

      Soraya

      --- On Thu, 3/8/12, sig@yahoogroups.com <sig@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      From: sig@yahoogroups.com <sig@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: [sig] Digest Number 3334
      To: sig@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, March 8, 2012, 3:02 AM



































      Slavic Interest Group (SIG) List




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      1a.

      White clothing
      From:
      halbrust_of_caid
      1b.

      Re: White clothing
      From:
      Liudmila



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      1a.



      White clothing

      Posted by: "halbrust_of_caid"
      iegrappling@...
       

      halbrust_of_caid



      Wed Mar 7, 2012 3:51 pm (PST)





      Hi everyone. First post here, not sure why I hadn't joined earlier.



      I've found a few depictions of 10th century Rus/Slav men wearing all white. Is there any evidence of this? Or did a modern artist have an idea and then others copied the idea?



      If there is historic precedence for it… Is there any significance to it? My wife suggested it might be religious or ceremonial clothing.



      -Halbrust








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      1b.



      Re: White clothing

      Posted by: "Liudmila"
      LiudmilaV@...
       

      mamainna2000



      Wed Mar 7, 2012 6:03 pm (PST)





      This is usually when they are in their underwear due to their penitent status or as they are being executed. However, white in the outer wear could also happen at wedding and such.



      Liudmila



      Sent from my iPhone



      On Mar 7, 2012, at 3:20 PM, "halbrust_of_ caid" <iegrappling@ aol.com> wrote:



      > Hi everyone. First post here, not sure why I hadn't joined earlier.

      >

      > I've found a few depictions of 10th century Rus/Slav men wearing all white. Is there any evidence of this? Or did a modern artist have an idea and then others copied the idea?

      >

      > If there is historic precedence for it… Is there any significance to it? My wife suggested it might be religious or ceremonial clothing.

      >

      > -Halbrust

      >

      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








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    • Noora Salminen
      ... I don t know about Slavic groups for sure, but in Fenno-Ugric tribes white clothes were worn for religious holidays and feasts. That info is from
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 8, 2012
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        > I've found a few depictions of 10th century Rus/Slav men wearing all
        > white. Is there any evidence of this? Or did a modern artist have an idea
        > and then others copied the idea?
        >
        > If there is historic precedence for it� Is there any significance to it?
        > My wife suggested it might be religious or ceremonial clothing.
        >
        I don't know about Slavic groups for sure, but in Fenno-Ugric tribes white
        clothes were worn for religious holidays and feasts. That info is from
        historical era, but it probably was the same earlier, too. Sacred colours
        usually don't change much.

        - Rakka

        --
        rakka@ircnet
        040 7031907
        "Ja roistot ratsastivat p�pelikk��n nauraen ja kadoten kuin sakset, ja
        kaunis neito huusi kuin hiomalaikka."


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