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Re: [sig] Info on Rus block printing on textiles?

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  • Hastings Sanderson
    Of further interest, a 15th century treatise in Monastery of St. Catherine at nurenburg. Directions for Manufacturing textile prints. CIBA review #26 covers
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 8, 2010
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      Of further interest, a 15th century treatise in Monastery of St. Catherine
      at nurenburg. Directions for Manufacturing textile prints.

      CIBA review #26 covers medieval printed linen chasubles


      http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/webdocs/mnm_mt32.pdf

      Someone's A&S documentation
      http://webzoom.freewebs.com/bessdarnley/Revised%20Woodblock%20Printing%20Project.pdf

      Cenninni's 15th century treatise �Il Libro dell� Arte

      On Sun, Mar 7, 2010 at 11:21 AM, Hastings <hodgepatch@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > I've been having so much fun carving molds for prianiki that I thought I
      > might try my hand at carving some wood stamps for textile printing. Before I
      > get crazy with it though, I wanted to have a bit more information. I was
      > wondering if it was a project that any one else here had explored?
      >
      > I did find this page (in Polish)
      > http://www.strojesigrid.zafriko.pl/str/tkaniny_ with some scraps of
      > printed wool fabrics dating to approximately the period I'm looking at. I am
      > a little flummoxed by the fact that they are done on wool however, as it was
      > my understanding that printing was normally done on linen. The references I
      > found (thank you, thank you Sofia for your translation of Kolchin) were more
      > in keeping with that as well. In the literature the linen seems to be
      > printed first and then overdyed. The wool in those examples doesn't
      > necessarily seem that way.
      >
      > There is a tiny blurb about block printing on textiles in my copy of
      > History of Textiles, but it is western centered so doesn't say much about it
      > until Indian cottons become popular in England, so that's not particularly
      > helpful.
      >
      > -Praksedys
      >
      >
      >


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