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Re: panova?

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  • Diane S. Sawyer
    ... {snip} ... {snip} ... {snip} ... Oh, yes... linen rubakha, linen panova... very cool and comfy. Linen is THE summer fabric, as far as I m concerned. I
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 3, 2000
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      --- Jenn/Yana <jdmiller2@...> wrote:
      > From: Jenn/Yana <jdmiller2@...>
      >
      {snip}

      > >
      > >Am I right? Are these panovas?
      >
      {snip}
      > And who
      > ever said that Russian
      > clothing is too warm? Don't these outfits look like
      > just the thing on a
      > hot summer day?
      >
      {snip}
      >
      > --Yana

      Oh, yes... linen rubakha, linen panova... very cool
      and comfy. Linen is THE summer fabric, as far as I'm
      concerned. I seem to remember reading that in early
      period it was acceptable to wear just a belted
      rubakha, but I simply can't bring myself to do so...
      it feels too much like running around in my underwear.

      Tasha
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    • MHoll@xxx.xxx
      In a message dated 1/3/2000 9:50:38 PM Central Standard Time, ... Remember that most of Russia has a continental climate: as hot as down here in south Texas
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 3, 2000
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        In a message dated 1/3/2000 9:50:38 PM Central Standard Time,
        jdmiller2@... writes:

        > And who ever said that Russian
        > clothing is too warm? Don't these outfits look like just the thing on a
        > hot summer day?

        Remember that most of Russia has a continental climate: as hot as down here
        in south Texas (just not for as long), and as cold as Alaska in the winter
        (but not as long, either). You bet they'd have comfortable clothing!

        > I have found it wise to be wary of the drawings in this book, however. The
        > clothing pictures aren't drawn very accurately. <...>

        And I'm shocked that the "middle-aged woman" is showing some of her hair! How
        rude and improper! A married woman, shining her hair! ;-)

        Seriously, considering the heavy fines imposable on someone who pulls a
        married woman's headdress off and reveals her hair, it's unlikely, really,
        really unlikely, that a married woman would not wear a cap and/or veil (or
        something) to hide her hair *completely*. Apart from that...

        I do share Yana's skepticism about the panova, although I'd conceived the
        idea that it was a garment more common in early period, later fallen into
        disuse by the nobility, and finally relegated to country clothing. It may
        have been a ritual piece of clothing, but that's just a vague idea.

        Especially since the conjectural ritual is not described anywhere, except for
        a cryptic image on a silver bracelet.


        Predslava Vydrina
        Per fess embattled azure and gules, two otters passant or.
        <A HREF="http://members.aol.com/Predslava/RussianHistoryTriviaPage.html">Russ
        ian History Trivia Page</A>
        (http://members.aol.com/Predslava/RussianHistoryTriviaPage.html)
      • MHoll@xxx.xxx
        In a message dated 1/3/2000 10:20:09 PM Central Standard Time, ... And right you are! To describe the terrible destruction and dishonor inflicted on a city,
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 3, 2000
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          In a message dated 1/3/2000 10:20:09 PM Central Standard Time,
          tasha_medved@... writes:

          > I seem to remember reading that in early
          > period it was acceptable to wear just a belted
          > rubakha, but I simply can't bring myself to do so...
          > it feels too much like running around in my underwear.

          And right you are! To describe the terrible destruction and dishonor
          inflicted on a city, the Chronicles note that the residents were stripped
          "even to their shirts". So no, a woman would not be going around in her
          undershirt. Men, working in fields on on some other hot, sweaty task, yes,
          but a woman would not be walking around in her underwear.

          The question arises, of course, of what exactly constituted underwear, and
          what would do for upper? outer?wear in the summer. Were there undertunics
          under the tunics, so one could strip to the tunic, and yet not the
          undertunic? Were there lightweight jackets or something, or would linen over
          linen (tunic and overtunic) be cool enough?

          But in undershirts? Really! How shocking! :-)

          Predslava.
        • Patricia Hefner
          ... or ... to ... Oh, I love this picture! To heck with is it authentic on a Meridian day when it s 98 degrees in the shade and the heat index is 120. I m
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 3, 2000
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            > Guess who got a scanner for Christmas? :) Here's a picture of a panova
            or
            > two, at least, I think they are panovas. I scanned this in from
            > Arkheologia: Byt i kul'tura. More pics, and Russian choir music, to come
            to
            > a web site near you!
            >
            > http://www.geocities.com/~chrstnj/sca/panova.jpg
            >

            Oh, I love this picture! To heck with "is it authentic" on a Meridian day
            when it's 98 degrees in the shade and the heat index is 120. I'm planning to
            paint this even though I've read that they block-printed the things. I'd
            hate to nuke my hand with a block-cutter. Putting up with sprained ankles
            from dance is injury enough, thank you very much.

            Dekuji!
            Isabelle patricia.hefner@...
          • Jenn/Yana
            ... I ll share an easy and cheap way to print on fabric that I learned in a fibers and fabrics class that is just right for doing simple geometric designs on
            Message 5 of 11 , Jan 4, 2000
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              Isabelle wrote:

              >I'm planning to
              >paint this even though I've read that they block-printed the things. I'd
              >hate to nuke my hand with a block-cutter.

              I'll share an easy and cheap way to print on fabric that I learned in a
              fibers and fabrics class that is just right for doing simple geometric
              designs on fabric, paper and whatever else you feel like printing. Get a
              block of 1/2" thick (or so) wood the size of your design. Take old, used
              *bicycle inner tubes* (thin black rubber) and cut your design out of them.
              Glue to the wood. You now have a durable printing block. You can use
              scissors or an exacto blade to cut the rubber, no need for special tools.
              Print using your favorite dyes/paints. I've only ever used t-shirt paint,
              but my teacher said she had used other substances to varying degrees of
              success. Test it on a sample piece of cloth first, wash and dry and see if
              you like the way it holds up.

              --Yana
            • Diane S. Sawyer
              ... Oh, excellent! Thanks for sharing! I use Delta Ceramcoat acrylic paint. It comes in a bazillion colors (I counted!), including gold and silver, and it
              Message 6 of 11 , Jan 4, 2000
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                --- Jenn/Yana <jdmiller2@...> wrote:
                > From: Jenn/Yana <jdmiller2@...>
                >
                > Isabelle wrote:
                >
                > >I'm planning to
                > >paint this even though I've read that they
                > block-printed the things. I'd
                > >hate to nuke my hand with a block-cutter.
                >
                > I'll share an easy and cheap way to print on fabric
                > that I learned in a
                > fibers and fabrics class that is just right for
                > doing simple geometric
                > designs on fabric, paper and whatever else you feel
                > like printing. Get a
                > block of 1/2" thick (or so) wood the size of your
                > design. Take old, used
                > *bicycle inner tubes* (thin black rubber) and cut
                > your design out of them.
                > Glue to the wood. You now have a durable printing
                > block. You can use
                > scissors or an exacto blade to cut the rubber, no
                > need for special tools.
                > Print using your favorite dyes/paints. I've only
                > ever used t-shirt paint,
                > but my teacher said she had used other substances to
                > varying degrees of
                > success. Test it on a sample piece of cloth first,
                > wash and dry and see if
                > you like the way it holds up.
                >
                > --Yana
                >

                Oh, excellent! Thanks for sharing!

                I use Delta Ceramcoat acrylic paint. It comes in a
                bazillion colors (I counted!), including gold and
                silver, and it cleans up quickly. I would recommend
                using a foam roller (look in the stenciling section of
                the craft store) instead of dipping the stamp in the
                paint; dipping makes it goopy. If you can't find a
                roller, use a foam brush to load the stamp.

                There are some foam stamps in the craft stores that
                might work for your purposes, BTW, both open cell and
                closed cell foam. The open cell foam takes a boatload
                of paint to load it, just so you know.

                Post pics when you get it done? Pretty please?

                Tasha
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