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Re: Kvas? Kvass?

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  • calvin_w_renn
    The Honorable Company of Fermenters and Brewers of Barony of Concordia of the Snows brewed a batch of kvass using one of the recipes from the Carolingian site
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 11, 2010
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      The Honorable Company of Fermenters and Brewers of Barony of Concordia of the Snows brewed a batch of kvass using one of the recipes from the Carolingian site that used dry rye bread. It turned out well. It was refreshing, but not something that I would drink on a regular basis.

      Regards,

      Pan Mikulaj von Meissen

      --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, Patoodle@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > I was wondering if anybody here has ever made kvas (sometimes spelled kvass)?
      >
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kvass if you don't know what I'm talking about here. (It's called "gira" in Lithuanian.)
      >
      > I tried once last summer, using a recipe from a "traditional Lithuanian cookbook" without historical documentation, and then I left it in the fridge too long without getting around to tasting it, so that it spoiled and became disgusting. I have a loaf of Ukrainian rye bread that I haven't gotten around to eating, so I was thinking of making a second batch for the "Anything Slavic" A&S competition in a neighboring barony on January 16th.
      >
      > Any tips or tricks I should know about? I guess I need to sterilize the bottles better....
      >
      > Also, has anybody found concrete documentation that kvas existed in period? I found this page (http://jducoeur.org/carolingia/orlando_kvass.html) on the Web site of somebody from Carolingia in the East Kingdom; the author pointed out a 16th-century recipe from a book called "The Domostroi," which is apparently in my local university library (which may be operating on reduced hours because of winter break).
      >
      > Is there any other documentation out there, and has anyone tried the recipes on that Carolingian page?
      >
      > Finally, I made a post on my Baltic blog -- http://ladypatriciaoftrakai.blogspot.com/2009/12/baltic-style-provisioning.html -- about some places that sell Eastern European foodstuffs in Massachusetts and Maryland. Sadly, I didn't get to my hometown market because of a brief but intense snowfall, but I went to the Russian Gourmet store in Maryland and bought a bottle of (non-alcoholic) kvas so that I would have *some* idea of what it's supposed to taste like. (Don't worry, I will NOT pass the commercial stuff off as my own; I have a few ethics!) In the meantime, if you know of good places to get Baltic/Slavic food and drink, please feel free to comment on the blog entry.
      >
      > Aciu (Thank you) in advance!
      >
      > Regards,
      > Lady Patricia of Trakai
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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