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Kvas? Kvass?

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  • Patoodle@aol.com
    I was wondering if anybody here has ever made kvas (sometimes spelled kvass)? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kvass if you don t know what I m talking about here.
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 6, 2010
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      I was wondering if anybody here has ever made kvas (sometimes spelled kvass)?

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kvass if you don't know what I'm talking about here. (It's called "gira" in Lithuanian.)

      I tried once last summer, using a recipe from a "traditional Lithuanian cookbook" without historical documentation, and then I left it in the fridge too long without getting around to tasting it, so that it spoiled and became disgusting. I have a loaf of Ukrainian rye bread that I haven't gotten around to eating, so I was thinking of making a second batch for the "Anything Slavic" A&S competition in a neighboring barony on January 16th.

      Any tips or tricks I should know about? I guess I need to sterilize the bottles better....

      Also, has anybody found concrete documentation that kvas existed in period? I found this page (http://jducoeur.org/carolingia/orlando_kvass.html) on the Web site of somebody from Carolingia in the East Kingdom; the author pointed out a 16th-century recipe from a book called "The Domostroi," which is apparently in my local university library (which may be operating on reduced hours because of winter break).

      Is there any other documentation out there, and has anyone tried the recipes on that Carolingian page?

      Finally, I made a post on my Baltic blog -- http://ladypatriciaoftrakai.blogspot.com/2009/12/baltic-style-provisioning.html -- about some places that sell Eastern European foodstuffs in Massachusetts and Maryland. Sadly, I didn't get to my hometown market because of a brief but intense snowfall, but I went to the Russian Gourmet store in Maryland and bought a bottle of (non-alcoholic) kvas so that I would have *some* idea of what it's supposed to taste like. (Don't worry, I will NOT pass the commercial stuff off as my own; I have a few ethics!) In the meantime, if you know of good places to get Baltic/Slavic food and drink, please feel free to comment on the blog entry.

      Aciu (Thank you) in advance!

      Regards,
      Lady Patricia of Trakai


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jennifer Nelson Kemp
      The one and only time my husband made it it was...special...and disgusting. He used the bread and apples and ...it was icky and messy in the making and yucky
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 6, 2010
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        The one and only time my husband made it it was...special...and disgusting.
        He used the bread and apples and ...it was icky and messy in the making and
        yucky to drink.

        Hope you do better.

        Ianuk

        On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 1:51 PM, <Patoodle@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        >
        > I was wondering if anybody here has ever made kvas (sometimes spelled
        > kvass)?
        >
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kvass if you don't know what I'm talking
        > about here. (It's called "gira" in Lithuanian.)
        >
        > I tried once last summer, using a recipe from a "traditional Lithuanian
        > cookbook" without historical documentation, and then I left it in the fridge
        > too long without getting around to tasting it, so that it spoiled and became
        > disgusting. I have a loaf of Ukrainian rye bread that I haven't gotten
        > around to eating, so I was thinking of making a second batch for the
        > "Anything Slavic" A&S competition in a neighboring barony on January 16th.
        >
        > Any tips or tricks I should know about? I guess I need to sterilize the
        > bottles better....
        >
        > Also, has anybody found concrete documentation that kvas existed in period?
        > I found this page (http://jducoeur.org/carolingia/orlando_kvass.html) on
        > the Web site of somebody from Carolingia in the East Kingdom; the author
        > pointed out a 16th-century recipe from a book called "The Domostroi," which
        > is apparently in my local university library (which may be operating on
        > reduced hours because of winter break).
        >
        > Is there any other documentation out there, and has anyone tried the
        > recipes on that Carolingian page?
        >
        > Finally, I made a post on my Baltic blog --
        > http://ladypatriciaoftrakai.blogspot.com/2009/12/baltic-style-provisioning.html-- about some places that sell Eastern European foodstuffs in Massachusetts
        > and Maryland. Sadly, I didn't get to my hometown market because of a brief
        > but intense snowfall, but I went to the Russian Gourmet store in Maryland
        > and bought a bottle of (non-alcoholic) kvas so that I would have *some* idea
        > of what it's supposed to taste like. (Don't worry, I will NOT pass the
        > commercial stuff off as my own; I have a few ethics!) In the meantime, if
        > you know of good places to get Baltic/Slavic food and drink, please feel
        > free to comment on the blog entry.
        >
        > Aciu (Thank you) in advance!
        >
        > Regards,
        > Lady Patricia of Trakai
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Yevgeniya Pechenaya
        Here is what i know as far as the basic recipe that i grew up with. Domostroi might be slightly different I ll check when i get home. 1kg or rye bread 200g
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 6, 2010
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          Here is what i know as far as the basic recipe that i grew up with. Domostroi might be slightly different I'll check when i get home.

          1kg or rye bread
          200g sugar
          50g or yeast (i'm pretty sure it's bread yeast the dry kind)
          6 liter of water (5liters for soaking the croutons / 1 liter for diluting the yeast)
          50g raisins

          cut the bread into croutons and dry/bake in an oven until dry and hard
          break up the croutons into smaller pieces and poor the 5 liters of boiling water over them.
          in 6-8 hrs drain the liquid it should be clear with a light brown tint
          add sugar and diluted yeast
          do all of this is a large sized pot kinda like you do with mead
          keep covered in the large pot for the first 12 hrs
          then put into bottles add 3-4 raisins to each bottle and close tightly
          keep in a warm spot 1st 24 hrs
          then move to a cold place
          Tastes best on the 4th day


          Lada

          Oooooh...
          SHINY!

          --- On Wed, 1/6/10, Jennifer Nelson Kemp <lady.ianuk@...> wrote:

          From: Jennifer Nelson Kemp <lady.ianuk@...>
          Subject: Re: [sig] Kvas? Kvass?
          To: sig@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, January 6, 2010, 4:51 PM

          The one and only time my husband made it it was...special...and disgusting.
          He used the bread and apples and ...it was icky and messy in the making and
          yucky to drink.

          Hope you do better.

          Ianuk

          On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 1:51 PM, <Patoodle@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          >
          > I was wondering if anybody here has ever made kvas (sometimes spelled
          > kvass)?
          >
          > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kvass if you don't know what I'm talking
          > about here. (It's called "gira" in Lithuanian.)
          >
          > I tried once last summer, using a recipe from a "traditional Lithuanian
          > cookbook" without historical documentation, and then I left it in the fridge
          > too long without getting around to tasting it, so that it spoiled and became
          > disgusting. I have a loaf of Ukrainian rye bread that I haven't gotten
          > around to eating, so I was thinking of making a second batch for the
          > "Anything Slavic" A&S competition in a neighboring barony on January 16th.
          >
          > Any tips or tricks I should know about? I guess I need to sterilize the
          > bottles better....
          >
          > Also, has anybody found concrete documentation that kvas existed in period?
          > I found this page (http://jducoeur.org/carolingia/orlando_kvass.html) on
          > the Web site of somebody from Carolingia in the East Kingdom; the author
          > pointed out a 16th-century recipe from a book called "The Domostroi," which
          > is apparently in my local university library (which may be operating on
          > reduced hours because of winter break).
          >
          > Is there any other documentation out there, and has anyone tried the
          > recipes on that Carolingian page?
          >
          > Finally, I made a post on my Baltic blog --
          > http://ladypatriciaoftrakai.blogspot.com/2009/12/baltic-style-provisioning.html-- about some places that sell Eastern European foodstuffs in Massachusetts
          > and Maryland. Sadly, I didn't get to my hometown market because of a brief
          > but intense snowfall, but I went to the Russian Gourmet store in Maryland
          > and bought a bottle of (non-alcoholic) kvas so that I would have *some* idea
          > of what it's supposed to taste like. (Don't worry, I will NOT pass the
          > commercial stuff off as my own; I have a few ethics!) In the meantime, if
          > you know of good places to get Baltic/Slavic food and drink, please feel
          > free to comment on the blog entry.
          >
          > Aciu (Thank you) in advance!
          >
          > Regards,
          > Lady Patricia of Trakai
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >

          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Hastings Sanderson
          I actually really like the kvass I have made (only done it a couple of times though.) I used Sandor Katz recipe from the book Wild Fermentation
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 6, 2010
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            I actually really like the kvass I have made (only done it a couple of
            times though.) I used Sandor Katz' recipe from the book Wild
            Fermentation http://www.amazon.com/Wild-Fermentation-Flavor-Nutrition-Live-Culture/dp/1931498237/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1262815808&sr=8-1
            Not a redaction of a traditional recipe per se, but I've liked all my
            other ferments I've made from his instructions so I went with his
            recipe.

            "Ingredients for 1/2 gallon

            1 1/2 pounds stale bread (traditionally hearty Russian black bread,
            made of coarsely ground whole-grain rye and/or barley, but any bread
            will do, and it doesn't have to be stale)
            3 T crushed dried mint
            1 lemon juiced
            1/4 cup honey
            1/4 tsp sea salt
            1/4 cup sourdough (or one package yeast)
            a few raisins

            Process:
            1. Cut bread into cubes and toast in an oven pre-heated to 300 F for
            about 20 minutes until dry
            2. Place cubes in a crock or wide mouthed jar, with the mint, lemon
            juice, and 12 cups boiling water. Stir, cover, and leave for 8 hours
            (or longer)
            3. Strain out the solids, pressing out as much liquid as possible.
            The soggy bread will retain some water, so you will end up with less
            liquid then you started with.
            4. Add honey, salt, and sourdough to the strained liquid, and leave to
            ferment 2 to 3 days.
            5. Transfer kvass to quart bottles only about 3/4 full. Add a few
            raisins to each bottle and seal. Leave the bottles at room
            temperature for a day or two, until the raisins float to the top.
            Kvass is then ready to drink, and may be stored in the refrigerator
            for a few weeks."


            I really like the stuff, but then I do a lot of fermented foods. We
            drink kombucha pretty regularly, in addition to always having a few
            types of pickles and mead going pretty constantly. The sourness can
            be an acquired taste for a lot of people.
          • Brandon J. Snowder
            I tried some once on a trip to Russia. I still wake up at night screaming. Sounds like you did it just about right. In accordance with prophecy, Brandon J.
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 6, 2010
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              I tried some once on a trip to Russia. I still wake up at night screaming.

              Sounds like you did it just about right.

              In accordance with prophecy,
              Brandon J. Snowder/Mikhail Voronov




              ________________________________
              From: "Patoodle@..." <Patoodle@...>
              To: sig@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wed, January 6, 2010 2:51:07 PM
              Subject: [sig] Kvas? Kvass?



              I was wondering if anybody here has ever made kvas (sometimes spelled kvass)?

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kvass if you don't know what I'm talking about here. (It's called "gira" in Lithuanian.)

              I tried once last summer, using a recipe from a "traditional Lithuanian cookbook" without historical documentation, and then I left it in the fridge too long without getting around to tasting it, so that it spoiled and became disgusting. I have a loaf of Ukrainian rye bread that I haven't gotten around to eating, so I was thinking of making a second batch for the "Anything Slavic" A&S competition in a neighboring barony on January 16th.

              Any tips or tricks I should know about? I guess I need to sterilize the bottles better....

              Also, has anybody found concrete documentation that kvas existed in period? I found this page (http://jducoeur. org/carolingia/ orlando_kvass. html) on the Web site of somebody from Carolingia in the East Kingdom; the author pointed out a 16th-century recipe from a book called "The Domostroi," which is apparently in my local university library (which may be operating on reduced hours because of winter break).

              Is there any other documentation out there, and has anyone tried the recipes on that Carolingian page?

              Finally, I made a post on my Baltic blog -- http://ladypatricia oftrakai. blogspot. com/2009/ 12/baltic- style-provisioni ng.html -- about some places that sell Eastern European foodstuffs in Massachusetts and Maryland. Sadly, I didn't get to my hometown market because of a brief but intense snowfall, but I went to the Russian Gourmet store in Maryland and bought a bottle of (non-alcoholic) kvas so that I would have *some* idea of what it's supposed to taste like. (Don't worry, I will NOT pass the commercial stuff off as my own; I have a few ethics!) In the meantime, if you know of good places to get Baltic/Slavic food and drink, please feel free to comment on the blog entry.

              Aciu (Thank you) in advance!

              Regards,
              Lady Patricia of Trakai

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Anthony Bryant
              ... When I was at the seminary, some of the more...um... adventurous bretheren from Ukraine and Holy Mother Russia were making kvas in their dorm rooms. It was
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 6, 2010
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                On Jan 6, 2010, at 3:51 PM, Patoodle@... wrote:

                >
                > I was wondering if anybody here has ever made kvas (sometimes
                > spelled kvass)?
                >

                When I was at the seminary, some of the more...um... adventurous
                bretheren from Ukraine and Holy Mother Russia were making kvas in
                their dorm rooms. It was SPECTACULAR.

                There are several brands (a favorite is Monasterskaya) of bottled and
                mass-produced "soft drink-ized" kvas that can be brought from Russian
                delicatessans and grocery stores (like the one near where I lived in
                Herndon). It's pretty good, but it really is a straight softdrink, not
                the real hard stuff.

                I really should break down and make my own.


                Effingham
              • calvin_w_renn
                The Honorable Company of Fermenters and Brewers of Barony of Concordia of the Snows brewed a batch of kvass using one of the recipes from the Carolingian site
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 11, 2010
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                  The Honorable Company of Fermenters and Brewers of Barony of Concordia of the Snows brewed a batch of kvass using one of the recipes from the Carolingian site that used dry rye bread. It turned out well. It was refreshing, but not something that I would drink on a regular basis.

                  Regards,

                  Pan Mikulaj von Meissen

                  --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, Patoodle@... wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > I was wondering if anybody here has ever made kvas (sometimes spelled kvass)?
                  >
                  > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kvass if you don't know what I'm talking about here. (It's called "gira" in Lithuanian.)
                  >
                  > I tried once last summer, using a recipe from a "traditional Lithuanian cookbook" without historical documentation, and then I left it in the fridge too long without getting around to tasting it, so that it spoiled and became disgusting. I have a loaf of Ukrainian rye bread that I haven't gotten around to eating, so I was thinking of making a second batch for the "Anything Slavic" A&S competition in a neighboring barony on January 16th.
                  >
                  > Any tips or tricks I should know about? I guess I need to sterilize the bottles better....
                  >
                  > Also, has anybody found concrete documentation that kvas existed in period? I found this page (http://jducoeur.org/carolingia/orlando_kvass.html) on the Web site of somebody from Carolingia in the East Kingdom; the author pointed out a 16th-century recipe from a book called "The Domostroi," which is apparently in my local university library (which may be operating on reduced hours because of winter break).
                  >
                  > Is there any other documentation out there, and has anyone tried the recipes on that Carolingian page?
                  >
                  > Finally, I made a post on my Baltic blog -- http://ladypatriciaoftrakai.blogspot.com/2009/12/baltic-style-provisioning.html -- about some places that sell Eastern European foodstuffs in Massachusetts and Maryland. Sadly, I didn't get to my hometown market because of a brief but intense snowfall, but I went to the Russian Gourmet store in Maryland and bought a bottle of (non-alcoholic) kvas so that I would have *some* idea of what it's supposed to taste like. (Don't worry, I will NOT pass the commercial stuff off as my own; I have a few ethics!) In the meantime, if you know of good places to get Baltic/Slavic food and drink, please feel free to comment on the blog entry.
                  >
                  > Aciu (Thank you) in advance!
                  >
                  > Regards,
                  > Lady Patricia of Trakai
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
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