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RE: panova questions

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  • Kies, Lisa
    ... Subject: [sig] panova questions From: Patricia Hefner Now, how do you sew one of these things? I know you use three
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 2, 2000
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      -----Original Message-----
      Subject: [sig] panova questions
      From: "Patricia Hefner" <patricia.hefner@...>

      Now, how do you sew one of these things? I know you use three panels, but
      how are these attached
      to each other? Sorry, sometimes written documentation really confuses me!
      Are the panels just rectangles? I know they're not supposed to be too full
      because in every picture I've seen of a panova the rubakha is showing in
      the front. Is that the only place the rubakha shows?
      ----------------------------

      The panova was made of three equal panels of fabric sewn together only at
      the top, and gathered on a drawstring. This means that the rubakha shows in
      three places, just like you've seen it showing in front. The panels are
      probably going to be rectangles, unless you have an unusual physique. The
      panova is supposed to be shorter than the rubakha, reaching to around the
      calves. I suppose you'll have to experiment a bit with their exact
      proportions. My understanding is that the fabric is supposed to be a bit
      sturdy, so it holds itself out somewhat over the rubakha.

      In service,
      Sofya la Rus
    • BanAvtai@xxx.xxx
      In a message dated 01/02/2000 12:26:35 PM Eastern Standard Time, lisa-kies@uiowa.edu writes:
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 2, 2000
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        In a message dated 01/02/2000 12:26:35 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        lisa-kies@... writes:

        <<
        The panova was made of three equal panels of fabric sewn together only at
        the top, and gathered on a drawstring. >>

        Only at the top? Do you mean the top edge so that the drawstring can be
        placed through the hem or do you mean a place on the upper torso?

        Iu'liana
      • Kies, Lisa
        ... Subject: Re: [sig] panova questions lisa-kies@uiowa.edu writes:
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 2, 2000
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          -----Original Message-----
          Subject: Re: [sig] panova questions

          lisa-kies@... writes:

          << The panova was made of three equal panels of fabric sewn together only
          at the top, and gathered on a drawstring. >>

          Only at the top? Do you mean the top edge so that the drawstring can be
          placed through the hem or do you mean a place on the upper torso?
          --------------------------

          The panova is a sort of split skirt, not a dress. The only place the three
          panels are designed to touch each other is at the top where they're gathered
          onto the drawstring waist.

          In service,
          Sofya la Rus
          http://www.strangelove.net/~kieser/Russia
        • BanAvtai@xxx.xxx
          In a message dated 01/02/2000 8:21:26 PM Eastern Standard Time, lisa-kies@uiowa.edu writes:
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 2, 2000
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            In a message dated 01/02/2000 8:21:26 PM Eastern Standard Time,
            lisa-kies@... writes:

            <<
            The panova is a sort of split skirt, not a dress. The only place the three
            panels are designed to touch each other is at the top where they're gathered
            onto the drawstring waist.
            >>

            Thank you! Although I should have known that from Mordak's packet (blushes
            furiously).

            Iu'liana
          • Elizabeth Lear
            Interesting contrast with the panova: the plakhta, or Ukranian winged skirt , is two panels sewn together halfway, then folded over a drawstring. The
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 3, 2000
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              Interesting contrast with the panova: the plakhta, or Ukranian "winged
              skirt", is two panels sewn together halfway, then folded over a
              drawstring. The petticoat (pidtychka) does not show in the back, only
              in the front, and the top layer of the plakhta splits open in the back
              as you wear it to show the under layer fabric. I made mine of a stiff
              heavy brocade which was blue with gold on the outside and gold with
              blue on the inside, which created a nice contrast. You wear the
              plakhta with a sorochka (blouse), korsetka (sort of a flared tunic)
              and a fartukh (apron). This was a common outfit for women in the
              Poltava region of Ukraine.

              -Yelizaveta
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