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Hussar tours, was Re: white tailed squirrel

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  • Rick Orli
    Eryk of Polish Hussar supply plus is again organizing a 16-17th C. history/battlefield and museam tour of poland this August, and has a special deal for those
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 30, 2009
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      Eryk of Polish Hussar supply plus is again organizing a 16-17th C. history/battlefield and museam tour of poland this August, and has a special deal for those who would participate in the vivat Vasa reenactment.
      I don't believe that was mentioned here this year, apologies if it was.
      Rick
      P.S.
      My daughter a.k.a. Alex, 6, is a lemur, and has been almost since birth. With her (invisable) long fluffy tail, she can be mistaken for a white tailed squirrel depending on the light. See, anything is possible.
      --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, Sasha <sashavilanov@...> wrote:
      >
      > hehe, I understand your point Aldo, but what parents would wish white tail
      > squirrel properties on their child? ;-p
      >
      > Sasha
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • aldo
      You re right! But I understand she was searching for a name to give herself. Was it so? I either would have never given such a name. As far as squirrels, for
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 30, 2009
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        You're right! But I understand she was searching for a name to give herself. Was it so?
        I either would have never given such a name. As far as squirrels, for sure there were a lot in the Middle Ages in the Northern Taiga and still now. I was a week ago in Novgorod Velikii for the Hansa Festival and there squirrels... as many as you need, especially in these days when there are white nights!
        Ciao

        Aldo
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Liudmila
        To: sig@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 7:31 PM
        Subject: Re: [sig] white tailed squirrel





        Once again, were such squerrels ever in existance there? I think not.
        I also think that no parent would use such a name. She could be either
        Belka or Belohvostka as a nickname, but not both.
        Liudmila

        On Jun 30, 2009, at 9:24 AM, "aldo" <turanomar@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > I would interpret such a name as follows:
        > The squirrel fur was very much appreciated especially in the Middle
        > Ages England as a material to sew elegant and expensive mantles of
        > course including the tails. So I would see such a name as a cozy one
        > with the wish of being appreciated in the future by noble men (to
        > marry).
        > Hey?
        >
        > Aldo
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Sasha
        > To: sig@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 2:58 PM
        > Subject: Re: [sig] white tailed squirrel
        >
        > hehe, I understand your point Aldo, but what parents would wish
        > white tail
        > squirrel properties on their child? ;-p
        >
        > Sasha
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • L.M. Kies
        Greetings from Sofya, The only official white-tailed squirrels that I have been able to find are the White-Tailed Antelope Squirrels of the American
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 30, 2009
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          Greetings from Sofya,

          The only "official" white-tailed squirrels that I have been able to find are the White-Tailed Antelope Squirrels of the American
          Southwest that look more like chipmunks to me and certainly would not have been found in Russia. Apparently the Kaibab squirrels
          of the Grand Canyon area can have white tails, too?

          An internet search has revealed quite a few blog entries, YouTube videos and such on "white-tailed squirrels". The closest thing
          to expert information I can find about them is here:
          http://www.midweeknews.com/articles/2007/08/15/local/de%20kalb_county/dekalbcounty03.txt

          They seem to be mutant semi-albino Eastern Gray squirrels (Sciurius carolinensis) sighted in the Midwest, which might explain
          their appeal for a SCAdian - they're cute and a little weird. ;-)
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Gray_Squirrel

          As Liudmila has already pointed out, the Russian squirrels are a different species than our gray squirrel. I could find no
          references to belokhvostiye belki with a Russian google search. The Russian wiki has a nice long list of squirrel species, but
          no "white-tailed squirrel" among them. The "ordinary squirrel" in the Russian Wiki is Sciurius vulgaris - the Eurasian Red
          Squirrel.
          http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%91%D0%B5%D0%BB%D0%BA%D0%B0
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_squirrel

          A more serious problem with the proposed name is that none of the examples of "Zoological" names given in Wickenden's article on
          the subject are two-part names. There are names for "bear" but not for "black bear", "cricket" but not "noisy cricket", etc.
          Note that the names that are two-part in English, i.e. gold finch, are actually one-part names in Russian, i.e. Shcheglov.
          http://www.goldschp.net/archive/zoonames.html

          Grammar is another problem. Patronymics are a variation of genitive case but don't quite follow standard grammar rules. The
          standard genitive form of belokhvostaya belka would be belokhvostoj belki, but the patronymic is actually belkin not belki, so I
          have no idea what to do with belokhvostaya in this case. Especially since it has to be further modified to the feminine
          patronymic form, belkina.

          The only way I can see to salvage it is to treat the two names as separate bynames - one as a personal descriptive byname and the
          other as a true patronymic, e.g. Kseniia white-tail daughter of Squirrel - Kseniia Belokhvostaya (doch) Belkina or vice versa.

          The Russian word for a ponytail, meaning a hairstyle, is khvost, so belokhovost could be interpreted as blond ponytail.

          At your service,

          Sofya
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