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Re: [sig] Re: Caucusus cooking

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  • Yevgeniya Pechenaya
    Yes it is indeed the recipie involving eggplant, tomatoes and bell peppers. Though my family recipe does not use bell peppers. As far as period it s a possible
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 19, 2009
      Yes it is indeed the recipie involving eggplant, tomatoes and bell peppers. Though my family recipe does not use bell peppers.
      As far as period it's a possible feast dish so i think i can get away with a border selection of food/time period.
      I will check out the book. I know for a fact that Azerbaijan foods have a very strong Persian influence as per some very quick research.

      Lada

      Oooooh...
      SHINY!

      --- On Mon, 1/19/09, Suzanne <sovagris@...> wrote:

      From: Suzanne <sovagris@...>
      Subject: [sig] Re: Caucusus cooking
      To: sig@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, January 19, 2009, 3:01 PM











      I'm pretty sure that if you look into Persian-style cooking of the

      period, you'll find similar preparations. Lilia Zaouali's book on

      "Medieval Cuisine of the Islamic World" may help with that search. It

      seems plausible to me that period recipes from the Caucasus would show

      some Persian influence.



      The second question is, what are the ingredients in your family's

      "ikra"? Tomatoes and bell peppers are native to Central & South

      America, so the tricky part is figuring out *when* those ingredients

      were accepted into Central Asian cooking. (How late is your persona?)

      I can imagine the dish without tomatoes... but not peppers!



      Susanna



      --- In sig@yahoogroups. com, Yevgeniya Pechenaya <ladie_lada@ ...> wrote:

      >

      > I've been looking for some period cook recipes from the Caucuses

      region, Georgia, Azerbaijan, etc

      >

      > I have a few Russian cookbooks at home that follow the Orthodox

      calendar and such so i know there are some recipes in there but those

      are Russian mostly.

      >

      > I'm particularly interested in the Russian Eggplant Caviar. The

      recipe has been in my family for quite a number of generations and

      I've manged to track it back historically to about the 18th century.

      > I know all the ingredients of the recipe are used in period. and

      I've seem it in multiple cookbooks. Is there anything that can tell me

      whether or not it's a period recipe?

      >

      > Thank you,

      >

      > Lada

      >





























      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Suzanne
      Yummmmm. :-) I ve only had the Russian version from the old Time-Life Russian Cooking set. The Balkan version, which is one of my favorite comfort foods,
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 20, 2009
        Yummmmm. :-)

        I've only had the Russian version from the old Time-Life "Russian
        Cooking" set. The Balkan version, which is one of my favorite comfort
        foods, is called "ajvar" [EYE-var, for the English speakers] and has
        no tomatoes but *a lot* of red bell pepper -- it's a beautiful deep
        red color and the flavor is wonderful. Thank goodness, there's a
        small independent grocery store in my town that imports it!!

        Let us know how your feast guests rave about Baklazhannaya Ikra --
        'cause we know they will.

        Susanna

        --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, Yevgeniya Pechenaya <ladie_lada@...> wrote:
        >
        > Yes it is indeed the recipie involving eggplant, tomatoes and bell
        peppers. Though my family recipe does not use bell peppers.
        > ....
        > Lada
        >
        >
        <snipped>
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