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garb and shoes

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  • susannah53
    First off I d like to thank everyone who answered my question about my friend who s pregnant and needs new garb. I found some books of historical theatrical
    Message 1 of 5 , May 12, 2008
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      First off I'd like to thank everyone who answered my question about my
      friend who's pregnant and needs new garb. I found some books of
      historical theatrical costume at the library and we photocopied the
      appropriate 15th century patterns. She decided that she would ask the
      seamstress who had made her Elizabethan garb to make it, but that I
      can make the chemise. (I have a copy of Kings, Queens, Knights and
      Jesters that has the pattern, which is of course very simple -- I've
      used it to make several Halloween costumes, including sorcerer,
      minstrel and Egyptian princess.) Now to my question: she recently
      bought herself a pair of shoes to complement her costume and they made
      her feet break out in a rash. (I know that the Renaissance fair at
      Ohio State was earlier this month, and that's probably where she got
      them.) It sounds like contact dermatitis, and that the leather the
      shoes are made of was treated with something she's allergic to. Does
      anybody have suggestions of what she might do; could she wear socks
      thick enough to provide a barrier or would there possibly be a way to
      neutralize whatever it is that's making her break out? I've washed
      leather things in the washing machine before, which might do the
      trick, but I gather these shoes were not inexpensive, so I wouldn't
      want to recommend it. If they got wet in the rain a couple times,
      that would probably take care of it too, but in the meantime, she'd
      have to worry about getting a rash from them.

      Susannah
    • Dee Thompson
      Now to my ... This will probably disappoint her, but the last thing she s going to want to do is wear them. _If indeed_ it is contact dermatitis, when her feet
      Message 2 of 5 , May 12, 2008
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        Now to my
        > question: she recently
        > bought herself a pair of shoes to complement her
        > costume and they made
        > her feet break out in a rash. (I know that the
        > Renaissance fair at
        > Ohio State was earlier this month, and that's
        > probably where she got
        > them.) It sounds like contact dermatitis, and that
        > the leather the
        > shoes are made of was treated with something she's
        > allergic to. Does
        > anybody have suggestions of what she might do; could
        > she wear socks
        > thick enough to provide a barrier or would there
        > possibly be a way to
        > neutralize whatever it is that's making her break
        > out? I've washed
        > leather things in the washing machine before, which
        > might do the
        > trick, but I gather these shoes were not
        > inexpensive, so I wouldn't
        > want to recommend it. If they got wet in the rain a
        > couple times,
        > that would probably take care of it too, but in the
        > meantime, she'd
        > have to worry about getting a rash from them.
        >
        > Susannah
        >
        >

        This will probably disappoint her, but the last thing
        she's going to want to do is wear them.
        _If indeed_ it is contact dermatitis, when her feet
        sweat from wearing the shoes, even with socks, it will
        cause whatever she's allergic to (and I'm going to bet
        its probably the dye) to leach out of the leather and
        through the fabric, onto her skin, and probably make
        the situation worse.
        Ditto for getting them wet in the rain and wearing
        them. Or washing them (because she'll have to wear
        them wet to help them keep their shape.)
        And the problem isn't that she'll just be bothered by
        it... Allergic reactions are tricky. They're your
        body's way of telling you, "Hey, monkey, this has
        something that's bad for me. I don't like it. Get it
        away." There is the possibility that the more she's
        exposed to what causes the rash, the worse her
        reaction will become over time.
        The only real solution would be for her to put some
        sort of waterproof barrier between her skin and the
        leather (I've seen folks use plastic bags at
        particularly nasty events to keep their feet dry and
        warm). And, well, that just isn't going to be either
        practical or comfortable for a pregnant woman,
        especially going into summer. Her feet won't be able
        to breathe. They'll get hot. They'll probably swell
        more. And then there's the possibility that she could
        develop worse problems with reactions because the
        further along her pregnancy gets, the more her
        circulation in her feet can become compromised, which
        means the rash might linger longer, or open up the
        possibility of infection through damaged skin, similar
        to a diabetic. (Think of contact dermatitis as a very
        light chemical burn, which technically it sort of is.)

        Sorry for the bad news. The up side, though, is that
        her dermatitis might be a side-effect of her pregnancy
        (which can happen) and a few months after she delivers
        she might be able to wear them.

        Fionnuala, going back to lurking


        Even though the voices in my head aren't real, they have some great ideas.



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      • Sfandra
        ... In addition: if she has the business card of the merchant, she could probably contact them to discuss the situation. I know one company that makes
        Message 3 of 5 , May 12, 2008
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          > Sorry for the bad news. The up side, though, is
          > that
          > her dermatitis might be a side-effect of her
          > pregnancy
          > (which can happen) and a few months after she
          > delivers
          > she might be able to wear them.
          >

          In addition: if she has the business card of the
          merchant, she could probably contact them to discuss
          the situation. I know one company that makes
          expensive but lovely moccasin type footwear for
          rennies, and they really stand by their product. She
          might be able to at least find out what sort of things
          went into the leather, thus narrowing the scope of
          what she might be reacting to. And again, it might be
          the pregnancy, which is at least a "self-correcting
          condition"! :D :D

          Cheers,
          Sfandra





          ******************
          Posadnitsa Sfandra Dmitrieva Chernigova
          KOE, Maunche, Apprentice to Maitresse Irene LeNoir
          Haus Von Drakenklaue
          Kingdom of the East
          ******************
          Never 'pearl' your butt.


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        • Lisa D Horan
          Hi Susannah, I may be able to help with shoe situation. There is a product you can get at most stores called aquaphor. It is an extremely thick, waterproof
          Message 4 of 5 , May 13, 2008
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            Hi Susannah, I may be able to help with shoe situation. There is a
            product you can get at most stores called aquaphor. It is an extremely
            thick, waterproof substance that works a lot like diaper creams to form
            a barrier between skin and ____. I have two boys with skin allergies &
            eczema and this stuff is great, hypoallergenic & very pure. I think you
            can even get a trial size to see if it works, but it is not too
            expensive and even if it doesn't work it can be saved for the baby.

            If it is a no go, I wore sherpa (Lambskin) shoes all through my
            pregnancy (twins born in august in FL) the extreme comfort outweighed
            the extra warmth. Hope this helped, Brinna.

            --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, "susannah53" <susannah53@...> wrote:
            >
            > First off I'd like to thank everyone who answered my question about my
            > friend who's pregnant and needs new garb. I found some books of
            > historical theatrical costume at the library and we photocopied the
            > appropriate 15th century patterns. She decided that she would ask the
            , and that the leather the
            > shoes are made of was treated with something she's allergic to. Does
            > anybody have suggestions of what she might do; could she wear socks

            >
            > Susannah
            >
          • nd sca
            Hi, I am sending this to the SIG in hopes that someone will be in the area and willing to teach a Slavic related A&S class this year... Also if you do teach,
            Message 5 of 5 , May 19, 2008
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              Hi, I am sending this to the SIG in hopes that someone will be in the area and willing to teach a Slavic related A&S class this year... Also if you do teach, the shire is going to comp your gate fees.


              The Shire of Drygestan has gratiously offered to waive the admission fees for the instructors of Arts and Sciences classes! If you are interested, please send me your class information, including topic, any age limits, class limit, class cost, length, preferred day and time, etc. If we get enough instructors, we may have classes on Friday as well as Saturday.

              We do have a limit on the number of classes we can hold, so this offer is on a first come-first served basis.

              Lonely Mountain is July 10-13 this year, and is held north of Santa Fe in the Jemez Mountains. It is cool (at night), shady (under the many trees), and beautiful (everywhere) !

              Natal'ia Georgivicha
              A&S Coordinator for LMD




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